New grad who wanted ICU, got med surg, advice? - page 2

by meagenreason | 3,685 Views | 26 Comments

Hi everyone, I am a new grad nurse who recently applied for a "residency"-type program for new grads at a local hospital. I wanted ICU as I did my preceptorship there in that hospital and throughout school I KNEW this was my... Read More


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    OP there is nothing wrong with jumping into ICU right after school. I believe the who "get a year in medsurg" is not a one size fit all. Some new nurses do need to go to medsurg first and some don't. Everyone learns in a different way and at a difference pace. I've worked in ICU and have seen new grads flourish in critical care.
    I would advise you to take the medsurg job only because the ICU job does not seem to be supportive of new grads. good luck !
    KimberlyRN89 and calivianya like this.
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    I wanted ICU desperately but got hired to med/surg for my first year. I was miserable because I just did not want to be there, but I made myself stick it out a year. Of course, if I'd had a better attitude about it, maybe the med/surg floor wouldn't have been quite so bad. I changed hospitals and got into an ICU with a phenomenal training program and I couldn't be happier now. I did learn a lot on med/surg and my time management is definitely better than it would have been otherwise. It was nice to come into the ICU orientation and already know how to be a nurse and just spend my time focusing on how to learn to be an ICU nurse.
    tokmom and C-lion like this.
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    When your going into such a critical area as the ICU I think it's important to go to a place that has a very well structured new graduate orientation system/program.

    If it were me I wouldn't feel safe going into an ICU with no well defined new grad orientation and that has come under significant legal scrutiny.

    I am a new grad as well. I will be working in a CVICU and was given an outline for a 22 week orientation plan. I did my preceptorship at this CVICU and worked in the float pool as a CNA for the same hospital for 2.5 years (although I never really got to work in the CVICU).
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    I would never commute an hour for any job without a chauffeur! Under no circumstances would I consider the ICU position you described.
    JBudd, sallyrnrrt, and canoehead like this.
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    Megan - consider yourself the luckiest new grad EVER! No dilemma here. You will thank yourself for the rest of your career, that you got good experience in med-surg before moving to ICU. I truly believe that no one should start in ICU as a fresh new grad, much less without a supportive, mentored residency. You should really know how to function as a professional nurse before learning the ICU side of things. I'm so thankful that I accepted recruitment into a new-grad residency for ICU step-down care, rather than a MICU or PICU. Good luck! You will be fine.
    canoehead likes this.
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    Go the med surg route all the way. I hated med/surg and didn't even apply to anything like that. I ended up getting a job in a chest pain unit, which really gives a person no experience. After 7 months I was able to transfer to a NICU level 2 position. I am in love with my job now. Also, if you worked for the hospital with the bad rap when you try to leave other hospitals may see that hospital and not want to hire you for fear of poor training.
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    Quote from PRNketamine
    RNsArewe,

    Nursing is a profession of life long learning. New grad or not, there is always SOMETHING you've never done. I don't believe in berating anyone for asking. Think of the consequences of not asking... Much worse.
    She wasn't berating the ICU nurse for asking! She was simply saying that if the ICU nurse had been in m/s first, the ICU nurse probably would have known how to do this herself, hence lending credibility to the OP's situation (going m/s before going untrained into the ICU).
    RNsRWe likes this.
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    My point is there is always going to be something someone has never done before. I disagree that working in a med surg floor would have given that nurse the opportunity to have a patient with a CBI. It all depends on the type of unit, the hospital, ext...
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    Quote from PRNketamine
    My point is there is always going to be something someone has never done before. I disagree that working in a med surg floor would have given that nurse the opportunity to have a patient with a CBI. It all depends on the type of unit, the hospital, ext...
    I agree.
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    Quote from PRNketamine
    RNsArewe,

    Nursing is a profession of life long learning. New grad or not, there is always SOMETHING you've never done. I don't believe in berating anyone for asking. Think of the consequences of not asking... Much worse.
    How on earth did you take what I wrote as "berating"? I gave a constructive opinion, explained why I felt that the ICU job she outlined was a poor choice, and how she would have opportunities to learn so many things that would be beneficial to her/him later on--ICU or anywhere else.

    Of COURSE there is always something else to learn, you completely missed my point. My POINT was that something that IS commonly learned on many med-surg floors may be very useful to know once in ICU. Using my own experience to draw from--I DID say it was my OWN experience--I know that if the ICU nurse in question HAD been on any of my hospital's med-surg floors, she WOULD have learned about a CBI. And in my hospital's ICU (the one she was calling me from), she WOULD have had the knowledge necessary. Can't speak for everyone everywhere, which is why I spoke as I did.
    Fiona59 likes this.


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