New Grad Traumatized After First Interview - page 4

by rollieem

6,839 Visits | 33 Comments

Hello everyone! After waiting 2 1/2 months of passing my NCLEX, I finally received a phone call from a Pediatric Rehabilitation Center who is interested in interviewing me. I am ecstatic, I love working with children and I... Read More


  1. 1
    Quote from not.done.yet
    That kind of tough love happens everywhere, not just nursing. She was looking for rehab to be where you want to be. Next time you will recognize it when the interview turns that direction and will pipe up about all the ways this particular job is what you want. It is kind of like a girl wanting reassurance the guy really loves her before she sleeps with him. They want to believe they are your first choice. Nobody wants to be the interim sweetheart.
    *chuckle*

    And in the real world, the guy says whatever he thinks she wants to hear so that he can get laid because he knows that they have only known each other 3 weeks and her expectations are unrealistic. When really, both would be much better off if the girl were honest with herself about the situation and adjusted her expectations. The relationship could then be based in honesty and they could enjoy each other's company for as long as it worked for both of them. I will never understand why women set themselves up like that and then fall to pieces when the fabrication they've built up in their heads crumbles in the face of reality. /end rant

    Honestly OP, your interviewer sounds like she has some conflicting and/or unrealistic expectations. Perhaps she hasn't been in management for very long. You may have dodged a bullet there.
    netglow likes this.
  2. 0
    I agree with the essence of what metal_mOnk posted. Look. All these posts about how this NM was some sort of Gandalf with great knowledge and wisdom and a plan for her selection of ONLY the BEST for her facility, are ridiculous.

    OP, you had the misfortune to waste your time, and gas for your car. I've never interviewed with anyone in nursing that I thought could manage their way out of a paper bag! LOL. This is why the nursing profession is such a massive trainwreck.
  3. 1
    I then meet with the director of nursing who is going to interview me. She sits down and looks at my resume and sees that I have done a preceptorship at a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit at a local hospital nearby. She then says to me, "Oh, I see you have PICU experience, why didn't you apply to this hospital?" I responded, " I did not see any openings but I am here and interested in learning more about your facility." She then asks, "Oh, so they're not hiring or they're hiring new grads?" I then answer, "I guess it's both?" (Maybe I shouldn't have said that?) She then goes into a tangent for about five minutes on how she is not really looking to hire any new graduates and that only a few will be hired because many of her nurses in the past has used their facility as a stepping stone to get into bigger hospitals. She also emphasized that she has to be really careful of who she hires (this facility is fairly new and will have its one year anniversary of opening next month). After hearing all this, I am just sitting there SHOCKED and feeling slightly angry thinking (okay, my resume clearly says I'm a new graduate, if you aren't interesting in hiring me, why bring me here in the first place and waste my time and your time?!) The rest of the interview went downhill. I just lost my concentration. I couldn't answer her other questions to the best of my ability and even froze during some points (think deer with headlights, haha).
    Almost this exact situation happened to me during when I searched for a second job. I worked at a hospital in NYS for 8 months but had to relocate to CT for personal reasons. I left my old job in very good standing and had a few interviews scheduled as I continued to work in my last few weeks. Most went well, and I landed a job I was very happy with in the end, but during one of them the manager of the floor asked if my old employer knew I planned to leave, which I answered no. In my mind, it is not standard etiquette to inform your employer of leaving before you actually have a solidified destination and plan to leave -- because what if your mind changes? However, this manager went into a tangent about how from a management perspective it is opportunistic to not inform your current employer that you are looking for other jobs. I knew then that this manager was wasting my time.

    To generally stupid managers:

    It's fine if you hold the idiotic belief that you should not leave a job in less than a year or that you need to give an unreasonably long amount of forward notice to your employer two months ahead of time that you are leaving, but don't interview people of whom you know for a fact that is true if you have no plan to hire them. You are just wasting both our times. Look at the resume, use your brain, and make an intelligent decision. It isn't that hard, people.
    netglow likes this.
  4. 1
    Quote from RNdynamic


    To generally stupid managers:

    It's fine if you hold the idiotic belief that you should not leave a job in less than a year or that you need to give an unreasonably long amount of forward notice to your employer two months ahead of time that you are leaving, but don't interview people of whom you know for a fact that is true if you have no plan to hire them. You are just wasting both our times. Look at the resume, use your brain, and make an intelligent decision. It isn't that hard, people.
    ^This!!!
    netglow likes this.


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