Hate Hospital - Do I have to do this ??

  1. Graduated in August, passed NCLEX and have been working on a Onc Med/Surg Unit since. I HATE IT. I love the patients and nursing skills but I hate the high patient loads and other craziness. Also, my hospital is in the "dark ages" with regards to computer systems for charting, MAR's and anything else which makes the record keeping/admin part of the job 10 times harder and more inefficient than it should be. I am always 1-2 hours getting out of there at the end of shift.

    Question: I went back to nursing school because I wanted to be an Onc nurse and give chemo. I really want to work in an infusion center.
    Do you all think there is any reason I need to stay in this darn hospital .. or.. can I just start looking for a job in an infusion center ?

    Opinions and experiences welcome. Thanks
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  2. 34 Comments

  3. by   pagandeva2000
    I have been listening to what current graduates are saying and that is you should aim to go where you like, it is not what it used to be traditionally, that new nurses must pay their dues in med-surg. I think you should consider your options. I think, for example, that I will not ever want to be a floor nurse...I see me as a clinic or home care nurse. Like you, the nurse to patient ratio is frightening and the stress is not worth it. Currently, I am working in a clinic, and have a home case on the side, and I am happy. I just became an LPN this June, and can't even conceive working in the floors anymore. I did it for 6 weeks at my job, saw the same things that you mentioned, and now, I am happier in the clinic. Best wishes to you!
  4. by   jmgrn65
    Go ahead and look for the job that you want, find out if they want hospital exp. If you know what you want go for it. Good Luck
  5. by   JoAnna McNurse
    Thanks for the good advice. I've about decided to "go for it" after the first of the year. This hospital craziness is just not for me.
  6. by   majestix
    I would be careful though about switching jobs too soon if this is your first job. I've been warned that if you agreed when hired to stick with your current job for a given period that to leave before that just because you don't like the job is like commiting professional suicide. To a potential employer, someone who jumps ship too soon worries them. Do they want to put the money into training you when they aren'y sure you'll stick around long enough to earn back their investment? I just graduated in August as well, and just started my first job this last Monday. I signed a contract saying I would stay put for at least 12 months, or else would pay them back a pro-rated fee for my training costs. If you have other professional references that are appropriate and really strong, then you can probably get away with it, but if you need your current employer as a professional reference and some facilities require at least 3 professional references), leaving so soon may make it difficult to get a good reference from them. Just thought you should hear the flip side of the coin so you can make an informed decision whichever way.
  7. by   PedsRNBSN
    YOU DO NOT HAVE TO DO THIS FOREVER!! I HATED hospital nursing mainly because it wreaked havoc on my new marriage with the crazy schedules and stress. So, after six months I started looking. I found this awesome day surgery position and am loving life. I have already received several promotions and am IN LOVE with my job. I might think that i don't want to get out of bed in the am, but I never think that I just don't want to go to work-like I used to. That said, you do need to learn the skills, time management etc, that hospital nursing teaches you. But you DON'T have to be miserable. I did get lucky because I had been working for a surgeon during nursing school to learn, so that helped put me ahead...but GO FOR IT!

    Kelly
  8. by   mom2michael
    I agree, a person doesn't have to be miserable forever, but I also agree, you need to weigh your options carefully because leaving a job too soon doesn't sit well with managers. While I didn't sign anything it was heavily implied during my interview that if I left before 1 year I would not get a decent reference from my manager. If I stayed the year and let her try and help me through the hardest part of my nursing career (that 1st year) she would allow me to go anywhere I wanted and give me glowing references, letters and recommendations.
  9. by   RN 4 U
    My advice is to, do as you plan, stick with it for at least a year just to get some experience under your belt and after that move on to something you really want to do. Having that experience will make you competitive and do not worry about job hoping. An experienced nurse once told me that nursing is the only profession where it does not look bad on your resume when you have had a lot of jobs, it gives you an edge because of all the experienced that you have gained. If you had another profession no it would not be a good thing, but in nursing it does not matter to the employers. There is a shortage, remember they need you and you have the experience. I am a brand new nurse also and have always know that hospital nursing is not for me but I plan to do it for a while just for the experience which I need and then I can move on to something better. You have to make the best out of a bad situation to get where you really want to go. you are headed in the right direction. Good Luck!
  10. by   Wendy_RN
    I understand how you feel. I went into nursing with the intention of working in Oncology as well. I don't look at hospital nursing as having to "pay my dues" but it does serve as a good foundation for my nursing practice. At lot of Oncologists are going to want you to have your certification to administer the drugs, and your facility may be willing to pay for that.

    I agree with the others in saying that you should refrain from "job hopping" if possible. I did leave my first nursing job after just over 3 months, but it was a very bad situation. I worked too hard for my license to risk loosing it. Otherwise, I would have just endured it for a year.

    A lot of people do go into nursing knowing that they do not want to do floor nursing for their entire career. Sometimes it is just a stepping stone. Only you can decide what is best in your situation. I wish you the best in whatever decision you make.
  11. by   K98
    Quote from mom2michael
    I agree, a person doesn't have to be miserable forever, but I also agree, you need to weigh your options carefully because leaving a job too soon doesn't sit well with managers. While I didn't sign anything it was heavily implied during my interview that if I left before 1 year I would not get a decent reference from my manager. If I stayed the year and let her try and help me through the hardest part of my nursing career (that 1st year) she would allow me to go anywhere I wanted and give me glowing references, letters and recommendations.
    Who cares if leaving a job too soon doesn't sit well with managers? They don't care about nurses. Nurses are just another piece of equipment, and they will take most any warm body with a license to fill a staffing slot. Some of my classmates had 3 jobs in the first six months.
  12. by   pagandeva2000
    One other suggestion I have is to look into other places, and if you find something else that suits you better, to leave, but never mention your current place of employment in your references. You may be walking from the frying pan into the fire, but there are more than one ways to skin a cat. I do believe that many places will take any warm body, but you have to wonder why there is such a high turnover in such facilities. There are reasons why nurses run for the hills.
  13. by   newbiern2006
    [quote=wendy_rn;1965396]i worked too hard for my license to risk loosing it.

    this is exactly what i have been saying about my current job - and i am out of there just as soon as i get my tuition reimbursement check. i'd leave right this minute if i didn't need that check so badly. i have talked to my nurse managers (there are two of them) and nothing is going to change. it's really only this bad on the night shift, and this facility cannot keep night nurses because of it. my last nursing teacher never worked a day in a hospital - she's been in public health from day one - i wish i'd known this before i put myself through the terrible stress i've had to endure.
  14. by   amy0123
    Do what you love! Get yourself out of what you hate!! Why put yourself through that mess?? Plus make sure the unit has the nurse to patient ratio the way you would like it. Do some homework before you make a big change!!!!!!

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