What age is "too old" to switch from RN to APRN? What age is "too old" to switch from RN to APRN? - pg.2 | allnurses

What age is "too old" to switch from RN to APRN? - page 2

Hi all. I'm early 40's, been a nurse for awhile -- almost all of it critical care. My plan was always to return to school for my masters so I could retire out of a physically-less-demanding but... Read More

  1. Visit  OllieW profile page
    #13 0
    Quote from Jules A
    Yikes that is like saying that just because someone has passed boards and have an active license they are competent to practice. I wish it were true but disagree in some cases. Unfortunately I have seen many skilled providers continue to practice when they were no longer competent due to the natural aging process. My personal opinion is our profession as well as physicians should have some age related requirements similar to airline pilots however in the case of this OP not even close to relevant.
    Well, then let them do Psych - you know something where competence isn't really a requirement ...JK LOL
  2. Visit  Jules A profile page
    #14 0
    Quote from OllieW
    Well, then let them do Psych - you know something where competence isn't really a requirement ...JK LOL
    I'd laugh too if in my area we actually didn't have a fair amount of 1/2 senile old farts still writing for whatever pills their clients with SUD were requesting. At least anecdotally that is what I find in psych with many of the older prescribers both MDs and NPs 70yo+. They seem to lose their discerning edge aren't able to read between the lines when patient's report and presentation are incongruent. They are unable to say no and tend to just keep loading the pills on as long as the patient keeps complaining. This isn't just with SUD patients but in general, again just anecdotally, way too much poly pharmacy. Two psychiatrists lost their license to practice in the past year and let me tell you it is similar to CPS taking your kids. Someone has to be ridiculously negligent to have either entity strip you of your rights.

    Perhaps even worse than the above is an aged neurologist still insisting on spinal tap for patients who already meet the present criteria for a MS diagnosis. He has trained his NP to require the same.
  3. Visit  BostonFNP profile page
    #15 0
    We have a but of that too Jules. I always just thought that maybe after 50 years of clinical practice they just got too tired to fight with people and do CMEs.
  4. Visit  Jules A profile page
    #16 0
    Quote from BostonFNP
    We have a but of that too Jules. I always just thought that maybe after 50 years of clinical practice they just got too tired to fight with people and do CMEs.
    Lol, very possibly, and for whatever reason it makes for disturbing outcomes. I'm glad someone else has noticed this and it isn't just me in line for the accusations of ageism. I truly don't think blindly encouraging someone to do something without actually considering the reality is as supportive as some might think. There are practical reasons why at least to me it makes no sense to embark on an expensive new career at 60+ when in fact it is likely many will need to retire in the next decade for one reason or another. Although I truly wish 60 was the new 40 looking at my sliding face and delayed reaction time I'd beg to differ. I chalk it up to another aspect of Americans feeling that if we want something or someone else has it we also deserve it.
  5. Visit  MrChicagoRN profile page
    #17 2
    Quote from Jules A

    I truly don't think blindly encouraging someone to do something without actually considering the reality is as supportive as some might think. There are practical reasons why at least to me it makes no sense to embark on an expensive new career at 60+ when in fact it is likely many will need to retire in the next decade for one reason or another. Although I truly wish 60 was the new 40 looking at my sliding face and delayed reaction time I'd beg to differ. I chalk it up to another aspect of Americans feeling that if we want something or someone else has it we also deserve it.
    Blind encouragement is not wise, but it making an informed decision is .

    If one considers the cost, the ROI, the number of years it takes to recoup that investment, ones health status, and an anticipated retirement age, that's a much different scenario. I thought long and hard about going down this path. In a year or 2 I may change my mind, and decide to just ride out my current job till retirement, but at least I have that option. I'd much rather quit a path than to say, "Damn I wish I had started that program."
  6. Visit  Palliative Care, DNP profile page
    #18 1
    The cohort age span was 23 all the way to 54 when we began in 2012. People made comments about both ends of the spectrum. Guess who was still standing when we graduated in May? That's right, the youngest now 27 and the oldest not 58. Cohort began with 40 and we graduated with 13. So I think will and determination count more than age sometimes. Good luck to you on your endeavors.
  7. Visit  OllieW profile page
    #19 5
    I am thinking when I am 80 i will switch to CRNA, I heard its a gas!
  8. Visit  MickyB-RN profile page
    #20 5
    I will be 52 when I begin the Post Masters NP program.
  9. Visit  WestCoastSunRN profile page
    #21 0
    Quote from MrChicagoRN
    Blind encouragement is not wise, but it making an informed decision is .

    If one considers the cost, the ROI, the number of years it takes to recoup that investment, ones health status, and an anticipated retirement age, that's a much different scenario. I thought long and hard about going down this path. In a year or 2 I may change my mind, and decide to just ride out my current job till retirement, but at least I have that option. I'd much rather quit a path than to say, "Damn I wish I had started that program."
    Right. I don't think there should be any sorts of cut-offs based on age -- for working or going to school. That said, I am an advocate for tightening up standards and testing competency. I share the same concerns many of you have regarding the dilution of nursing -- and specifically advanced practice nursing.
  10. Visit  gettingbsn2msn profile page
    #22 4
    The oldest in my class was 54 when she started and she works in mental health in a top hospital on the east coast. Myself, I was 50 when I went back and I am happy with my choice.
  11. Visit  MickyB-RN profile page
    #23 1
    Quote from gettingbsn2msn
    The oldest in my class was 54 when she started and she works in mental health in a top hospital on the east coast. Myself, I was 50 when I went back and I am happy with my choice.
    Yes, I don't want regrets. I will take it a semester at a time.
  12. Visit  JellyDonut profile page
    #24 2
    I always feel sad for those really old nurses who are 60+ where many of their patients are younger than them. Nursing can be labor intensive with all the pulling, lifting and turning these morbidly obese patients. I do not blame the old timers from getting away from the bedside by any means possible. Hospitals will work you short staffed, freeze raises and make you work every crappy shift there is. It is tough to make a 30 year career as an RN at the bedside. If NP is your way out then take it and do not let anyone discourage you or tell you what you ought to be doing. Unless they are paying your bills their opinion does not matter.
  13. Visit  Rocknurse profile page
    #25 1
    The only thing I will say, to play Devil's Advocate, is that I started this journey when I had just turned 48. I'm now turning 50 and menopause is rearing its ugly head and kicking my butt. I am having some real issues with symptoms and if I had known how that would be then I might not have signed up for this. I am entering my final year and it's absolutely brutal. I go to a tough program with many demands and am also working full time and I wish I was 20 years younger and had the energy I used to have. I struggle with the physical demands of clinical days on top of working which I know wouldn't have been an issue a few years ago. That's the stuff no one tells you but I suppose it's going to happen no matter what you're doing in life. Nothing to do but cling on and press forward. In contrast, there's a guy in my class who's nearly 60 and has no issues at all with energy. Ladies, enjoy your youth because getting older is a .....

close