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You need some educating!!!!!!!

Nurses   (2,360 Views 18 Comments)
by gt4everpn gt4everpn, BSN, RN (Member)

gt4everpn is a BSN, RN and specializes in Licensed Practical Nurse.

9,046 Profile Views; 724 Posts

ph.d in nrsg? wow, what do you do with that! tell me everything!

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6,487 Posts; 21,375 Profile Views

Professorship.....run nursing schools......

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1,343 Posts; 5,651 Profile Views

Research, start your own business, teach other Ph.D. candidates, publish papers, write textbooks, work for Fed gov.

What did you have in mind when you got it?

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3,270 Posts; 17,164 Profile Views

I guess you can be a professor in a college.

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3 Followers; 36,784 Posts; 96,971 Profile Views

Most of the people I've met with that level of education teach in university nursing programs. One person had her own consulting business but still was working as a staff nurse. She got forced into the position of DON, when the DON walked off the job. The administrator had originally hired her in a consulting position. She resigned a few months into her stint as DON.

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scribblerpnp specializes in Pediatrics.

351 Posts; 5,382 Profile Views

Most people with a PhD in nursing work mainly in the college setting teaching BSN, MSN, or other PhD nursing student. Most of these also do research or work as a nurse practitioner (you will find out VERY early that the pay you ,ake as a professor TEACHING nursing students is often less than nurses make). You can also teach nursing with an EdD (doctorate of education). It just depends on what your college pushes the faculty towards. Some prefer a PhD, some prefer an EdD. I received my MSN from a college that had teachers who had a nursing degree, but the PhD might have been in a different (but related) field (psychology, psysiology, genetics). I really thought that they brought something different and special to the class (though seemed really hard- since how many MSN students are going to understand physiology the same way a PhD in physiology does?).

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llg is a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

5 Followers; 13,094 Posts; 58,272 Profile Views

I have my PhD in Nursing and work for a children's hospital. Here is a list of some of the things I do in my job:

1. Teach classes for the nurses who work at the hospital

2. Help analyze the status and needs of our nursing workforce -- recruitment, retention, etc. Monitor national trends in workforce issues and help the hospital develop projects and programs to address any problems.

3. Act as a liaison between my hospital and the local schools of nursing (arranging student experiences, trouble-shooting problems, etc.)

4. I developed (and now run) a summer extern program for nursing students. Extern programs are jobs/education programs for nursing students.

5. I established (and now run) a scholarship program for nursing students

6. I have done a little writing for publication and speaking at professional conferences

7. I recently taught a course at a local school of nursing

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1,343 Posts; 5,651 Profile Views

I have my PhD in Nursing and work for a children's hospital. Here is a list of some of the things I do in my job:

1. Teach classes for the nurses who work at the hospital

2. Help analyze the status and needs of our nursing workforce -- recruitment, retention, etc. Monitor national trends in workforce issues and help the hospital develop projects and programs to address any problems.

3. Act as a liaison between my hospital and the local schools of nursing (arranging student experiences, trouble-shooting problems, etc.)

4. I developed (and now run) a summer extern program for nursing students. Extern programs are jobs/education programs for nursing students.

5. I established (and now run) a scholarship program for nursing students

6. I have done a little writing for publication and speaking at professional conferences

7. I recently taught a course at a local school of nursing

Wow, you do keep busy. Do you think you are paid sufficiently? If you had it to do over, would you get your doctorate?

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wonderbee is a BSN, RN and specializes in critical care; community health; psych.

1 Article; 2,212 Posts; 12,727 Profile Views

Advanced practice nursing. There is talk that a doctorite will be required at some near future date.

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llg is a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

5 Followers; 13,094 Posts; 58,272 Profile Views

Wow, you do keep busy. Do you think you are paid sufficiently? If you had it to do over, would you get your doctorate?

Actually, I'm only at work 40 hours per week, goof off a lot of that time, and only do a little work at home. (As evidence of that, I submit my many posts here on allnurses.com.) I am a very "low-energy" kind of person. I work for an hour, then I rest for about 2 hours. Really ... I'm not kidding. I've just learned over the years to be very focused in my work so that everything I do contributes directly to a project and a "result" that I can claim as having accomplished something. I don't waste time doing things that don't add up to anything.

As far as the pay goes ... I am paid on the same salarly scale as my hospital's Master's prepared CNS/staff development roles. That was kind'a my deal with the hosital -- I wouldn't ask for a higher salary, and they would tolerate my need for schedule flexibility and to not work more than 40 hours per week. In other words, I said ... "If I can have a good quality life, I won't ask for more money." We recently got a new Vice President for Nursing. I hope she doesn't try to pile on too much work. If she does, I don't know what I'll do.

Do I regret getting my PhD? No way! I would do it again in a minute. It was a very happy time of my life. I loved the classes and what I learned in them. I didn't do it for the money: I did it for the learning -- and I am very glad I now know the things I learned in that program. I can't think of anything better to spend my money on.

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Actually, I am a very "low-energy" kind of person. I work for an hour, then I rest for about 2 hours. Really ... I'm not kidding.

QUOTE]Would that I could say that about bedside nursing. After going full tilt for 6 to 8 hours you find yourself having to speed up. AS I approach my 60th year that is no longer an option. So here I sit, at my computer with soap opera on the TV. Life is hard.

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llg is a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

5 Followers; 13,094 Posts; 58,272 Profile Views

Actually, I am a very "low-energy" kind of person. I work for an hour, then I rest for about 2 hours. Really ... I'm not kidding.

QUOTE]Would that I could say that about bedside nursing. After going full tilt for 6 to 8 hours you find yourself having to speed up. AS I approach my 60th year that is no longer an option. So here I sit, at my computer with soap opera on the TV. Life is hard.

I hear you. I am 52 and I am quite sure my body would not respond well if I were doing bedside, inpatient nursing. I have several chronic health problems and I really get exhausted when I have to be on my feet for a long time and/or teach for a few hours. So, I really prefer to space my work out -- e.g. work in short bursts throughout the day and work a little at home on the weekends rather than try to sustain long stretches of productivity over a more condensed work week.

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