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WOW.. two more failures and I'm out:(

So today, me and my partner go in to do positioning and bed bath check offs, today was our 2nd clinical, we started last Monday(me and my partner had to come back today b/c we moved to slow) So anyways, we go in and we missed verbalizing "put on gloves" for oral care, my partner forgot to wash the butt cheeks and she couldn't mitter her side of the bed. I'm not sure what I did wrong, but I know I did things wrong he just didn't say anything to me. He looks at us and tells us that he's letting us slide with these and that we can only fail two labs. Talk about pressure and anxiety!!!!!

I think we're moving too fast, first thing when we walked in last monday was our first day. The first thing we did was wash our hands (he didnt' teach us how) we just got up and did it and he told some things that were wrong while we were doing it. Then we went into positioning, again he didnt teach us, show us videos, nothing.... Iguess we're expected to know how before our first day??? Then we went onto bed bath, making occupied bed, and transfering to wheelchair and stretcher!!! Did anyone else go through this on their first day. It's like he expects us to know how to do everything already and then this monday was checkoffs for all that stuff. By the way, I failed handwashing TWICE.I know what I'm doing wrong and he doesn't give me time to verbalize it as soon as I do it he's like "your contaminated" and then I have to stop. I really feel like he wants me and my partner to fail because he thinks we don't know how to do things. I feel so discouraged but I'm not giving up.

moongirl

Specializes in OB.

oh man, are you in an RN program? I def wasnt treated like that. Handwashing and infection control was like a 2 hour chunk of lab, complete with a "bug light" to show us spots where we missed. Transferring was a whole 4 hour lab, complete with a video and then practice on classmates using lifts, slider boards, wheelchairs etc.bed baths etc was an entire learning lab as well Your situation does NOT sound right

oh man, are you in an RN program? I def wasnt treated like that. Handwashing and infection control was like a 2 hour chunk of lab, complete with a "bug light" to show us spots where we missed. Transferring was a whole 4 hour lab, complete with a video and then practice on classmates using lifts, slider boards, wheelchairs etc.bed baths etc was an entire learning lab as well Your situation does NOT sound right

:( yeah the only video we have seen was on first aid, and transferring to stretcher so far..... we get to practice on each other, but still you really only get once chance because theres so much material. This was only our second week of lab and we got checked off on all that. I think it's too much, the other labs aren't even checking off yet.

Daytonite, BSN, RN

Specializes in med/surg, telemetry, IV therapy, mgmt. Has 40 years experience.

You mentioned something about videos. Do you have videos of these procedures in your nursing lab or library? If so, you need to be looking at them--not once, but a couple of times to make sure you have the information. Are there procedure manuals somewhere that tell you exactly what you are supposed to be doing step-by-step for each of these things? You need to be memorizing them. It doesn't sound like you are moving fast at all. You are moving at the same pace we moved at in my nursing program 30 years ago.

Some instructors are tougher than others. Some want students to prove to them just how badly they want to be nurses. Did you ask questions when you were making errors? What kind of feedback did you get? Some instructors want students to make a real good faith attempt to find the information on their own first--they did in my nursing program. This is how they encourage autonomy, something you will need to be familiar with when you go into the world of nursing after graduation and are still taking baby steps.

I would recommend that like actors learning their blocking (positions on the stage) and their lines, that you and your partner practice, practice, practice your next clinical check off procedure until you know it verbally by heart according to the step-by-step procedure and can do each physical part of it perfectly. This will require some hours of working together on it. If that means stopping and, let's say, performing a mitered corner 100 times until perfecting it, then that is what you do. This is how actors perfect their performance. And, getting checked off, or a grade in these procedures, is much the same. Don't make the mistake of thinking that because you've washed your hands or made your bed for years that you know the "nursing" way of doing it. That would be incorrect thinking. Open your mind a little here. You're in nursing boot camp. When the instructor says "jump", you say "how high?" and just do it, whatever it takes. You didn't work this hard to get this far to be defeated by some particularly tough instructor, did you? You're in the big leagues now. Time to show your true grit, if you've got it. You are going to be expected to do a lot of study and preparation on your own--with the exception of where you might find the resources to do this--it won't be handed to you.

Have you tried talking to him? We practiced washing our hands so many times we never wanted to wash them again. If he won't listen to you, go to someone higher up. How is everyone else doing? Good luck!:icon_hug:

BeccaznRN, RN

Specializes in NICU, High-Risk L&D, IBCLC. Has 13 years experience.

I definitely agree - the fundamental stuff is WAY too important to not spend a good chunk of time on. We were required to watch the videos relating to the lab skills before going into lab, then we were given a thorough demonstration of the skills by our faculty. And they were very good about explaining what they were doing, why they were doing it, etc. etc. It was then up to us to practice the skill during open lab hours (and we have a RN that runs our lab so she was always available to show you skills again or answer your questions), then we made an appointment to do the return demonstration for the faculty when we were ready (which was 1-2 weeks later on average).

Do you have open lab hours for practice? Perhaps you could speak with your theory instructor? Whatever you do, you've got the right idea - don't give up!!!!

Daytonite, BSN, RN

Specializes in med/surg, telemetry, IV therapy, mgmt. Has 40 years experience.

yeah the only video we have seen was on first aid, and transferring to stretcher so far..... we get to practice on each other, but still you really only get once chance because there's so much material. this was only our second week of lab and we got checked off on all that. i think it's too much, the other labs aren't even checking off yet.

are you sure you can only see these videos once? our nursing lab allowed us access to videos during the times that the nursing lab was open. some schools have these videos in the school library rather than the nursing lab. i search the web all the time for basic nursing clinical procedures and it is always the same. just about every nursing school has these videos of nursing procedures on restricted access to the students of their school only.

look, you need to consider nursing school very much like a full time job. during my first semester of nursing school, many of us spent hours in the nursing lab looking a film strips (video technology wasn't available then) long after classes were dismissed and other students were long gone. we came in on days when we didn't have any classes scheduled just to get to see some of these films. we also had a library of journals and nursing textbooks we could use. this is what it is going to take to get through this, kiddo. check through your orientation handouts again and see what kind of study aids the school has provided for nursing students. i'm sure they are there for you. it's going to be up to you to find out where they are and how to get access to them. if all else fails, ask someone in the nursing office or one of the other nursing instructors until you get a satisfactory answer as to where these materials are!

are you sure you can only see these videos once? our nursing lab allowed us access to videos during the times that the nursing lab was open. some schools have these videos in the school library rather than the nursing lab. i search the web all the time for basic nursing clinical procedures and it is always the same. just about every nursing school has these videos of nursing procedures on restricted access to the students of their school only.

look, you need to consider nursing school very much like a full time job. during my first semester of nursing school, many of us spent hours in the nursing lab looking a film strips (video technology wasn't available then) long after classes were dismissed and other students were long gone. we came in on days when we didn't have any classes scheduled just to get to see some of these films. we also had a library of journals and nursing textbooks we could use. this is what it is going to take to get through this, kiddo. check through your orientation handouts again and see what kind of study aids the school has provided for nursing students. i'm sure they are there for you. it's going to be up to you to find out where they are and how to get access to them. if all else fails, ask someone in the nursing office or one of the other nursing instructors until you get a satisfactory answer as to where these materials are!

thank you for the feedback, yeah were only seeing them once. the thing is though my partner (she promised me today that we would start practicing though) has a child and works days that i'm off and i work days that shes off so we didn't practice any of our skill checkoffs that we had this week. i'm going to start staying after anyways even if she doesn't to watch the videos over again. i'm just wondering ( i just emailed him) if one of us fails, does the other? like today he didn't point out things that i did wrong, but i know i did things wrong but he didn't say anything to me, just to my partner and we both failed!

Daytonite, BSN, RN

Specializes in med/surg, telemetry, IV therapy, mgmt. Has 40 years experience.

. . .I'm just wondering ( i just emailed him) if one of us fails, does the other? LIke today he didn't point out things that I did wrong, Im sure I did I guess but he didn't say anything to me, just to my partner and we both failed!

You need to be pro-active and ASK. Ask again, if you have to. But do it to make it clear to yourself. You owe it to yourself. Don't worry about your partner. Do this for YOU. Look at this instructor and make him answer you, don't let him ignore you. Some people will use another person's meekness to use that as an advantage over them. If he is doing this to you, recognize it and don't let him do it. If you have to, go to another instructor in the department and talk to them about him doing this.

Tweety, BSN, RN

Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac. Has 28 years experience.

Good luck!

WDWpixieRN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg <1; Epic Certified <1.

I have to agree with Daytonite....forget your partner and her time issues...not that I'm not understanding, but she had to know what she was getting in to...we had our first checkoffs this Monday and thank heavens I have a great partner (I feel bad for her as she's been working as an aide in a nursing home and I don't have any experience!) who is as concerned as I am about "showing up".....she already has a lot of these skills, but knows that we need to do it the instructor's way and not what she's already been doing....however, I see some of the other younger students perhaps not taking this as seriously as others....we already lost one who said this wasn't what she expected (in week one?!?!?).

Are there alternate people you can practice with? We did that last week when one gal's partner couldn't make it during the available practice time. We ended up with about 7 of us working together to ensure we all understood techniques and what we 'thought' we were going to be tested on. The more, the merrier!!

So hang in there, do research on the net -- heaven knows there's a ton of info out there, check any CDs you might have with your book(s) or the publishers' related websites, and your school library. In our nursing lab we also have some Mosby's training on the PCs and other videos to watch. These are in addition to what's loaded on a general PC lab across the hall that's open much later than our lab, plus videos that are available in our campus library. Hang in there!!

marilynmom, LPN, NP

Specializes in Adolescent Psych, PICU.

Well nursing school DOES move fast, very very fast.

At my school we get to practice once in lab and then we have to do that skill in clinical usually the next day. So moving fast is just the way it is. That is what makes nursing school so hard! We are expected to do a lot of learning both on campus and off at home, on our own--I think that is standard. IMO it doesn't sound like you are moving fast at all though, but maybe you were just not prepared or expecting to be moving so fast.

But, for physical assessment we usually watch a video (even though most are stupid...lol) and we talk about it for a bit, then go to lab to practice once. Do you have an open lab where you can go in and practice at another time? We are expected to do that, and a lot of times I practice on my husbands and kids at home. I do a lot of reading as well and there are some videos they have posted up in the stickies do watch. I also have a book that shows pictures of basic nursing skills (Foleys, etc). You have to be very proactive in your nursing skills and knowledge. When we had Fundamentals some of us would go to open lab a LOT to practice over and over and over again until we got it down.

Last lab we had to assess all the heart sounds (S1, etc), learn where all the heart sounds could be heard, know what a murmer, split sound, atrial gallop, sounded like. How to assess the pulse points (atrial, carotid pulsasions, etc) and more, all in one day.

Most nursing skills we practice once and then basically it's on the job learning.

Hang in there. Don't let your lab partner mess you up. You have to be in this for YOU and take charge of your learning.

Good luck!!!

MMARN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiac/Telemetry.

I hope you take into consideration what Daytonite has said. She gave some extremely great points. Nursing school is as much of a "school" as it is self-teaching. Last semester was my first, and, although I didn't have to verbalize what I had to do or was doing, I had to make sure I knew what I was doing. This required practice, practice, and more practice. I've never had any type of experience in the hospital or with this type of thing before, so it was up to me to make sure I taught myself as well as took my time to listen, and do whatever I had to do to get it right. The first time I did hand washing, I didn't do it right. The clinical instructors bathed my hands in this neon orange "goo" that glowed in the blacklight they used to see if I did it right. I missed my wrists. Therefore, I had to go back, put more goo on and do it all over again. You must take things in stride. You won't be perfect. No one will be; no matter how much experience they have, you are all in the same boat.

I had this very strict, demanding, and blunt clinical instructor who told us straight out what we were doing and if we kept doing it, we would fail. She intimidated the bee-geesus out of me! However, it is because of her that I learned things the right way. You must think of yourself, of course, but you also have to think about the patients. If you don't learn to do something right, you will, more than likely, cause them harm. Sometimes it is those professors--who hurt your feelings, make you feel stupid--who will help you succeed. There's always a silver lining. Always.

Nursing school will naturally move fast. There is overwhelming amounts of information that we need to learn, prepare for, and fine tune. Try to relax. I know it's easier said than done, but I've learned from personal experience that if you stress out, you wind up hurting your concentration and blocking things out that are vital for your learning. Learn to manage your time. Go, whenever you have a free minute, to the library, the lab tech (who should have videos for nursing students readily available; I know in my school, they do) your professor, here, and any type of resource available to you that can help you out. In fact, in this forum, I believe there's a sticky that has videos on how to do various things. Use it. It is very helpful. Try to have fun in class. It's not that hard, really. The things you're learning are fascinating and helpful. Don't let stress and your own natural insecurities to let you down. Insecurities are good; overconfidence often gets you into trouble. :wink2: I hope you enjoy your experience and to read later that you're doing great. Good luck and God bless!!!

Race Mom, ASN, RN

Specializes in NICU/L&D, Hospice. Has 8 years experience.

In my 1st semester we were required to come to lab prepared, self taught, videos watched, chapters read. We went to lab, had a short lecture (10-20mins) mainly about why we need to do the things we are doing...not how to do them. Then it was off to practice and test when ready. No step-by-step taught, but tons of support. It really worked out well. Nursing school is so different. At first your mad that you have to teach yourself before going to class, but it becomes second nature and gives you a great foundation.

willdgate

Specializes in none, still looking.

So, what did you need to know, just venting, huh. Get use to dealing with this stuff in nursing school, it happens all the way through it.

allthingsbright

Specializes in LDRP.

Great advice...

You definitely need to be on your toes--are you READING your assigned stuff--before lecture? Some programs do a little more handholding than others, but ultimately the learning lies in your hands. YOU need to read, watch videos, go to lab on your own time and ask for help, ask other classmates for help, take your instructor aside and tell him you WANT to learn and ask for his imput. It never slows down and each semester you will do more and more on your own. It IS overwhelming, but it CAN be done.

Good luck to you. It sounds like you really want this badly. Be proactive, k?

I emailed my instructor telling him how I feel and this is what his response was. Hearing everyones advice in the forum for me and his advice to me has made me feel alot better:) Thank you all and I hope by December I'll be posting on here that I made it through this semester. Good luck to everyone!

Scarlett,

You did not "slide by." you both have an unsuccessful attempt at bedbaths and bedmaking. Although your performance yesterday was substandard, I did not feel it was enough to fail you. You were at least able to verbalize what you needed to do. Your not wearing gloves during oral care put you more at risk than the patient. Had you endagered the patient, you would have failed. We evaluate students individually even

when in pairs. I could see that your performance had improved and that you were more prepared than your partner. That is also partly why you were successful. As I told you yesterday, if either of you continue to not practice and to come to lab unprepared, you won't have to worry about "sliding by." You simply can't do the skills you have to do

without practicing. As for being labled or singled out as failures, I believe each of you can be successful. Ironically, the student you reminded me of started exactly the same way. She and her partner came unprepared, failed the same checkoffs and got the same talk you got yesterday. She was able to turn it around and became an excellent student. She is now in forth semester and doing well. Perhaps I can have her talk with you. If you

would take some suggestions, I suggest that you 1) move off the back row 2) Get motivated. Leave the flip flops and jeans at home. Checkoffs are still in the lab area so the rules still apply... I could have sent you home just based on your dress 3) Practice after classes. At least then you and your partner are here. If she won't come back another day, you come anyway. 4) Find those who are motivated and who are being successful and ask them if you can join them. If your partner fails, you will be placed

with another group anyway. 5) DO SOMETHING EVERYDAY!!!! There is a lot to do and it can be overwhelming. Make it a goal to do something everyday. Read one chapter. Practice one skill. learn one type of math problem. etc. BUT DO SOMETHING!!! We are here to help you but only if you help yourself.

allthingsbright

Specializes in LDRP.

I emailed my instructor telling him how I feel and this is what his response was. Hearing everyones advice in the forum for me and his advice to me has made me feel alot better:) Thank you all and I hope by December I'll be posting on here that I made it through this semester. Good luck to everyone!

Scarlett,

You did not "slide by." you both have an unsuccessful attempt at bedbaths and bedmaking. Although your performance yesterday was substandard, I did not feel it was enough to fail you. You were at least able to verbalize what you needed to do. Your not wearing gloves during oral care put you more at risk than the patient. Had you endagered the patient, you would have failed. We evaluate students individually even

when in pairs. I could see that your performance had improved and that you were more prepared than your partner. That is also partly why you were successful. As I told you yesterday, if either of you continue to not practice and to come to lab unprepared, you won't have to worry about "sliding by." You simply can't do the skills you have to do

without practicing. As for being labled or singled out as failures, I believe each of you can be successful. Ironically, the student you reminded me of started exactly the same way. She and her partner came unprepared, failed the same checkoffs and got the same talk you got yesterday. She was able to turn it around and became an excellent student. She is now in forth semester and doing well. Perhaps I can have her talk with you. If you

would take some suggestions, I suggest that you 1) move off the back row 2) Get motivated. Leave the flip flops and jeans at home. Checkoffs are still in the lab area so the rules still apply... I could have sent you home just based on your dress 3) Practice after classes. At least then you and your partner are here. If she won't come back another day, you come anyway. 4) Find those who are motivated and who are being successful and ask them if you can join them. If your partner fails, you will be placed

with another group anyway. 5) DO SOMETHING EVERYDAY!!!! There is a lot to do and it can be overwhelming. Make it a goal to do something everyday. Read one chapter. Practice one skill. learn one type of math problem. etc. BUT DO SOMETHING!!! We are here to help you but only if you help yourself.

Sounds like he wants you to succeed. I would follow his advice! :) GL and let us know how it goes.

suzy253, RN

Specializes in Telemetry/Med Surg.

He sounds reasonable to me and has given you some advice. Is there a dress code that you're not adhering to as well? Better take his advice on that as well and use your time wisely. Go in for practice, prepare yourself before, do your reading, etc. Bedbaths and bedmaking are basic skills and things will just get more intense as you go along so it would be beneficial to you to get yourself into good study and preparation habits for your nursing arts lab. Good luck.

He sounds reasonable to me and has given you some advice. Is there a dress code that you're not adhering to as well? Better take his advice on that as well and use your time wisely. Go in for practice, prepare yourself before, do your reading, etc. Bedbaths and bedmaking are basic skills and things will just get more intense as you go along so it would be beneficial to you to get yourself into good study and preparation habits for your nursing arts lab. Good luck.

Yeah, I'm glad I emailed him and he's emailed me again with advice and is very helpful. I had the wrong impression at first because I thought he was just being mean, but actually not! As far as the dress code, I figured it didn't matter because I was coming in not on my clinical day to do the checkoff. Now I know that even if it's not my scheduled day we have to be in uniform:)

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