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Would you choose an Associates OR Bachelors in nursing? need your opinions, please.

I have been a pre-nursing student for the past 2 years, and have been diligently taking all of my pre-nursing classes and have been getting all "A's".

Just this month I was faced with a dilemma that has me choosing between 2 programs. I received letters from both the Associates degree program from a community college and also I received an acceptance letter from a university for the accelerated 18months BSN in nursing program. My dilemma is that I don't know which on to choose.

I have saved up about $22,000 for nursing school. The associates program cost about $8000 for the full 2 year term and the BSN nursing program cost about $20,000 full term.

The associates program starts in January 10th 2006 and I will graduate in December 2007. The BSN nursing program starts in May 2006 and I will graduate the same time like the associates in December 2007. Now the catch is, I am accepted to the accelerated BSN program on a provisional basis, meaning that come around March 2006, I will have to be interviewed by a panel of directors and then they will decide if I will be fully accepted to the BSN accelerated program. But with the associates program I am already accepted with no provisions and will start immediately on January 10th 2006. If I don't get in into the BSN acclerated program I am guaranteed a spot in the August 2006 regular 3-year BSN program but I am reluctant to take the 3 year because I am getting older, I am currently 29 and want to start a family.

I do plan on going further in my nursing career and eventually get my Masters and become a Nurse Practitioner or some where down the lines of Pediatrics.

I was hoping I can get some feedback from you folks and please give me some sound advice because this will affect my life and the decision I make today can make a huge impact later in my life. I come to you guys for help and want to know what is the right thing to do and yet I do understand it is my ultimate decision but it does help to see other people's perspectives.

Well, to get a master's you first have to have a bachelor's...

It might take longer if you take the ADN to BSN route, but I'm not sure.

How soon do you want to become a NP? If you want to do that, I would recommend doing it now, b/c children will just consume your whole life, from my understanding.

That coming from a person w/o children, though....

SmilingBluEyes

Has 20 years experience.

If you plan your Master's/NP, go for the BSN. It makes the most logical progressive sense. You will need that BSN for the MSN anyhow, and it's better to get it done now, than to have to work/go to school and struggle to get a BSN later.

GalRN

Has 14 years experience. Specializes in Psychiatry and addictions.

I agree... I think you should go for the BSN. My mom made the decision for me when I was 18, and I'm very thankful that she made me get my BSN. I want to go to grad school, but can't right now d/t money issues. But at least I can go directly into my Master's when I'm ready. If I had the ADN it would be one more hurdle to overcome.

DLS_PMHNP, MSN, RN, NP

Has 11 years experience. Specializes in Psychiatry.

I had the same dilemma you are having, and decided to go for my BSN.

Again, it's easier to get it done all at once, instead of finishing your ADN, getting your license, and going back for your BSN.

You will have the challenges of being a brand new RN AND having to go back to school to get your BSN.

I feel it is easier to get it all done at once! (Too bad BSN school is so darn expensive, though!):uhoh3:

Good Luck with your decision :rolleyes:

Diane

Mountain Nurse

Specializes in MedSurg.

I had the same decision to make, but where I live they offer a RN to BSN, so it will take me two years to get my ADN and only two semesters after that for my BSN. That is a total of three years, two years at the cost of a community college, and only two semesters at the university cost. You may want to check into whether or not a program like this is offered.

Tweety, BSN, RN

Has 28 years experience. Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac.

I had the same decision to make, but where I live they offer a RN to BSN, so it will take me two years to get my ADN and only two semesters after that for my BSN. That is a total of three years, two years at the cost of a community college, and only two semesters at the university cost. You may want to check into whether or not a program like this is offered.

How many credit hours in this RN to BSN program in those two semesters. Saying "two semesters" could mean different things depending on the number of hours.

Also, we're there any pre-reqs prior to the two years of ADN school? You're making it sound like a person can get a BSN in two years and two semesters, which doesn't make sense to me.

My RN to BSN program is two years (but I had some co-reqs to take). But it's a part-time program for working nurses.

To the OP, it is advisable to get the BSN if you can swing it. I couldn't do it that way myself and RN to BSN programs with tuition reimbursement from employers are all around these days.

Good luck in whatever you do.

I'd choose the BSN too . . . . since you don't have kids yet.

Lots of good advice here . ..

steph

Mountain Nurse

Specializes in MedSurg.

How many credit hours in this RN to BSN program in those two semesters. Saying "two semesters" could mean different things depending on the number of hours.

Also, we're there any pre-reqs prior to the two years of ADN school? You're making it sound like a person can get a BSN in two years and two semesters, which doesn't make sense to me.

My RN to BSN program is two years (but I had some co-reqs to take). But it's a part-time program for working nurses.

To the OP, it is advisable to get the BSN if you can swing it. I couldn't do it that way myself and RN to BSN programs with tuition reimbursement from employers are all around these days.

Good luck in whatever you do.

These two semesters are two 14 credit hour semesters offered through online or web-enhanced classes. They wanted you to have most of your pre-req's, ex. A&P, 2 English classes, etc. before you get in to the ADN. (My english classes were online and so were humanities.) That is mostly because the program is so competitive. I am married and want to start a family soon, so two years going and one at home was a better choice for me.

Corvette Guy

Specializes in Telemetry, OR, ICU.

If you plan your Master's/NP, go for the BSN. It makes the most logical progressive sense. You will need that BSN for the MSN anyhow, and it's better to get it done now, than to have to work/go to school and struggle to get a BSN later.

:yeahthat:

I took the looooong route via AAS in Surg Tech, AAS in Nursing [ADN], then Online RN-BSN program. I was a single-parent with 2 sons wanting to change careers from aircraft electrician to healthcare field. I chose the Surg Tech field period of study first d/t ADN waiting list was about 2-3 yrs. Chose ADN before BSN d/t did not have all the prereqs for the BSN program. Later, decided on BSN program d/t a stepping stone [i.e. required for MSN program].

So, I certainly don't knock anyone that chooses the looooong route, such as I did, d/t life's hurdles & roadblocks. However, sounds like the OP has the opportunity, funds, and still very young [i did not start college until my early 30's] to attend BSN program.

Good luck in whatever path you choose best for you.

:)

I too took the long route but don't recommend it. In the long run, straight to BSN saves time and money (BSNs advance faster at some hospitals).

I would take the BSN and run never looking back!

I would like to take this time to introduce myself. My name is Amy and I have been a Pre-Nursing Student for about....3 years. I love it but it makes me sad, happy and everything else. I took Nursing Assistant 3 times so far. I ve been in a LPN program but drop out becuz I don't think I can emotionally take it. But I want to so bad. I don't know what to do. Ahhh.

I too also debate if I would like to go for Associates or Bachelor Degree. From what my sleepless nights debating what I would do. I would defiently say go with the bachelor degree I think it will be the most rewarding for you educational wise. I wish you luck. in whatever you do.

Here's something you might be able to do to save time and money: take some courses @ a community college, and then make sure those courses are transferrable to a 4-year college. That is, make sure you know they are transferrable before you take them. See an advisor every semester, and especially before you start taking any classes. I know you can do that with other degrees, maybe it can be done w/nursing?

BadBird, BSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care.

I am in a accelerated RN to BSN program now, my understanding of 18month BSN programs required you to already have your RN either by diploma or associate degree.

Daytonite, BSN, RN

Has 40 years experience. Specializes in med/surg, telemetry, IV therapy, mgmt.

Here are a few other considerations you might want to think about. You need to realize that in an accelerated program the information is going to be presented quickly. You need to be able to assimilate it quickly. If you've never done any kind of nursing before you may find it extremely stressful. If you are confident in your study skills then I would go for the BSN. If you've never had a nursing class before, you may find it difficult to adjust to because you do not, in general, have much information to build on as you do when you take a history or math class (you've had history and math all through HS to build on). If you go to the BSN program, do you have all the pre-requisites required by the college to get a bachelor's degree (not just to get into the nursing program)? I went from AA to BSN and had to spend time taking pre-requisites for the bachelor's degree at the university I ended up at--a lot of extra fine arts, math and humanities that were required since the BSN program was in the college of liberal arts. Not only that, but the BSN program did not take our nursing classes from the junior college in transfer. We had to take and pass a written and clinical test designed by the BSN program before we were accepted into their program. If you go AA first, have an idea of where you want to do your BSN and get the university catalog so you know what classes they are going to require to get in. Most universities require that you take a certain amount of your credit hours at their university before granting any kind of bachelor's degree. Look into all that before making a decision. I will also tell you that depending on where you are in the country, some hospitals can be picky about hiring only BSNs, particularly if there are a lot of BSN programs where you live. So, check out the job market in your area as well to see if hospitals by you are hiring new graduate AA degree nurses into the acute hospitals or turning them away to find work in LTC and other places.

Tweety, BSN, RN

Has 28 years experience. Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac.

BTW, saving that much money for college is an awesome accomplishment! Congrats on that!

Tweety, BSN, RN

Has 28 years experience. Specializes in Med-Surg, Trauma, Ortho, Neuro, Cardiac.

These two semesters are two 14 credit hour semesters offered through online or web-enhanced classes. They wanted you to have most of your pre-req's, ex. A&P, 2 English classes, etc. before you get in to the ADN. (My english classes were online and so were humanities.) That is mostly because the program is so competitive. I am married and want to start a family soon, so two years going and one at home was a better choice for me.

That makes a bit more sense to me. So it's 3 years of full time nursing school. But more time before that for pre-reqs and co-reqs. So in reality you're going more than just 3 years. Thanks for clearing that up.

That sounds like a good program, getting the 28 hours over in 2 semesters. I'm taking just six hours a semester. But for me that works just fine, especially with car payments and a mortgage that won't go away.

austin heart, BSN, RN

Specializes in ICU.

Well, to get a master's you first have to have a bachelor's...

Just to clarify......You do not have to have your bachelors to get a masters. Many universities are now offering accelerated ADN to MSN, with NP after that.

With that said, I personally would go for the accelerated BSN if you have the time and money.

Wio

NYRN05

Specializes in Med-Surg /Cardiac Step-Down/CICU/CTICU.

i too was faced with that difficulty but unfortunately i didn't get into the bsn program and i got into the adn....so thats what i did...but hon-if you got the money and no kids right now...definately do the bsn...next year i want to go back for my bsn and i know it will take about 2 years....and i eventually want to get my masters in nurse anesthesia or NP. so since you have the time and money...go for the bsn if not adn is not a bad route. good luck in whatever you do.

Shanna

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