Wondering if anyone knows if an lpn in alberta canada can administer iv push meds.

Posted
by sacare sacare (New) New

Wondering if anyone knows if an lpn in alberta canada can administer iv push meds. I am guessing not. Possible new client requiring iv meds via butterfly catheter and unable to get answer from association this weekend. Need answer asap. Help!!!:confused:

sacare

sacare

2 Posts

Wondering if anyone in alberta who reads this question can help. Need answer asap. Client with iv meds, butterfly catheter.(IV Push med, not hung) I believe that this is not within my scope for homecare in alberta, but need to know this weekend, since association is inaccessible. Help!!!:confused:

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 16 years experience. 226 Articles; 27,608 Posts

Your post has been moved over to the Canadian Nursing forum so that you can get more regionally specific responses.

Keep in mind that you are probably not going to get your question answered immediately due to the time of day that you are asking this question (5:00am eastern standard time). Be patient and check back in a few hours for some replies. Good luck to you!

Fiona59

Has 18 years experience. 8,343 Posts

Giving morphine, dilaudid via eze-set is NOT an IV push. IV push is considered directly through a vein via the IV line. The eze-set/butterfly is considered via subq. At least that's how my facility (AHS acute care) views it.

What are you trying to administer via butterfly/eze-set.

RGN1

RGN1

Specializes in med/surg. 1,700 Posts

LPN's can push narcan IV once certified at my facility, otherwise no. However, as the other poster has said butterfly/eze-set is sq & so it is is not an IV push to administer meds via that route.

UofCRN

UofCRN

Specializes in Med-Surg. 17 Posts

To my knowledge, LPNs in AB absolutely cannot give IV push meds. I'm an RN and I actually had to be certified to do IV push meds, and only in some very specific circumstances. The others are right about EZ/butterfly sets, though ... these are subcutaneous routes and are not considered to be IV push.

kids

1 Article; 2,334 Posts

Not an LPN in Alberta but...

The op is pretty clear that the question involves giving a med IV using a butterfly. What is relevant is where the access device is being inserted (vein or sq tissue) not the device used to access.

I give a lot of hemophilia factors IV push with a butterfly, they are by no stretch of the imagination "considered" SubQ.

I hope the op gets it sorted out.

RGN1

RGN1

Specializes in med/surg. 1,700 Posts

It will depend on certification and the unit you are on, as I said, our LPN's, once certified, can give Narcan IV push, as many of our patients are on PCA pumps.

Fiona59

Has 18 years experience. 8,343 Posts

Not an LPN in Alberta but...

The op is pretty clear that the question involves giving a med IV using a butterfly. What is relevant is where the access device is being inserted (vein or sq tissue) not the device used to access.

I give a lot of hemophilia factors IV push with a butterfly, they are by no stretch of the imagination "considered" SubQ.

I hope the op gets it sorted out.

The OP hasn't been back to comment.

I work in AB as do other posters. The butterfly/eze set is widely used here to administer narcotics into the subq or for HDC in Palliative cases.

linzz

linzz

Specializes in Geriatrics, Med-Surg.. 931 Posts

I certainly can't say whether or not you are allowed to do this according to your work place policy. It's already been said that your licencing board allows you to do this. I live in Ontario and have not heard of RPN's being able to do IV push but I could be wrong.

I think if you are in doubt, then don't do it until you are sure. It is just not worth the risk. Also I would consider whether you have been taught this skill and whether you are competent to do it.

OgopogoLPN

OgopogoLPN, LPN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, LTC/Geriatric. 585 Posts

OK, dug around the clpna website and it appears we can:

http://clpna.com/Portals/0/Files/doc_V-2-10_IV_Push.pdf

Having said that, in my facility the only RNs who can do an IV push are in the ICU and ER. The residents do it on the floors.

Really? Wow. What about IV antibiotics or Zofran? We often get patients back with orders of ancef xxmg IV q8h x 3 doses or IV zofran as the first choice as an antiemtic. I see RNs do IV push meds all the time including the above mentioned and narctotics. That would be weird to have doctors do those which seem so routine to me. (Well routine to observe, not do personally)