Wilkes PMHNP 2020

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trimeduRN, BSN

188 Posts

Specializes in Informatics; Labor & Delivery; Med-Surg. Has 15 years experience.
On 9/26/2019 at 9:44 AM, Nurseannblessings said:

@Msmedic68w @kaylee

I just received notice that I was ACCEPTED! I am beyond excited and grateful to GOD! @kaylee Check your email....

@Msmedic68w and @kaylee how is the program. Wilkes was at the top of my list. But I’ve also heard some horror stories. How have your experience been?

 

trimeduRN

kaylee.

330 Posts

Specializes in Stepdown . Telemetry. Has 10 years experience.
On 11/14/2020 at 9:09 PM, ToFNPandBeyond said:

Beware California residents: 

I was informed (upon my inquiry, and last minute), that they are now currently not authorized to accept California residents. So, if you applied and got accepted for fall 2020, like me, it's a no-go for you.

hi! this is an old post, but if u see this, I am in the MSN pmhnp currently, I started Spring 2020. at the time I applied CA was approved, but today randomly saw that it is no longer approved! will be emailing stat but do u know if this applies to me (Spring 2020) or is it just starting as of fall 2020? thanks!

Ashley B

11 Posts

Specializes in Med surge, hospital. Has 8 years experience.

Hey looking to apply to Wilkes PMHNP program.  The admissions advisor said students spend on average 20-25 hours a week on the program. Is that true?  I have 2 kids and I work full time. Is the program doable?  Can anyone tell me about the workload? Is it a lot of tests? Papers? Any group work? 

RNFalconIII

21 Posts

Specializes in Critical Care Registered Nurse. Has 4 years experience.
On 7/8/2021 at 6:03 AM, Ashley B said:

Hey looking to apply to Wilkes PMHNP program.  The admissions advisor said students spend on average 20-25 hours a week on the program. Is that true?  I have 2 kids and I work full time. Is the program doable?  Can anyone tell me about the workload? Is it a lot of tests? Papers? Any group work? 

Hi Ashley, I am about to complete my second semester at Wilkes. Full Time coursework (2- 12wk courses a semester) is challenging with or without kids and a FT job, especially patho and pharm. Patho is difficult because there is so much information to take at one time, not because it is "innately" difficult like organic Chemistry. Pharm takes more thinking things through. Every course so far (Patho, pharm, research, role) have had discussion boards that will be what take a lot of your time instead of just being able to focus on studying. Patho had 4 exams plus a small project, Pharm 3 exams and 1 quiz; a couple of papers in the other courses. 

I have a part time day job, no kids, and am taking FT course load. I do read more slowly and distractible, have a hard time sitting down focusing when there is so much that needs to be done. Found it very challenging to study to the extent that I wanted to get the grades that I wanted. In Patho, I studied, studied, studied, made a 93 in the course, but with Wilkes, a 94 or above is considered an A. In pharm, looks like Im going to be making in the high 80s/ B. It is very easy to make a C if you do not cover so much of the information and do not do spaced-repetition and reviewing. 

What I am saying is that if you would like to work FT, go to school FT, with kids, there will have to be some give, and you would have to be okay with not doing your best (there is only so much of you that you can give to all these things). Some areas will suffer more than others. If FT work means 3 days a wk, it is very likely doable; if it means 4-5 days a week, then I do not recommend FT course load until you complete both Patho & pharm. I heard that the DX & assessment courses should be taken together if possible, but are not too difficult to manage. 

My patho professor had powerpoints, which were more like outlines. My pharm prof has no lectures. Reading the book like they say will be insufficient in your journey to be a great NP. I highly recommend using a medical lecture program. I am using Lecturio, which has high-yield medical info for patho, pharm, diagnostics, treatment, etc. I imagine that I'll be using this for the first few years of my career as well until I become proficient in diagnostics and keeping up with the latest research. It is congruent with what has been in my courses/books so far even down to the dosing. I cannot go on enough about it and so go on Youtube and watch some videos on it, I think you can create your account for free, sign in and roam around and see what subjects they have (have more than you will ever need). You can type in a disease process or anything into the search bar and it will everything up on it, such as lets say asthma....It will give you every video on it in the basic lectures on it, then specifics for pediatrics, family medicine, acute care medicine, internal medicine and how it affects other things, etc. The type of account that I created was the one for medical students---which does ALSO INCLUDE all of the information of nurse practitioners, nurses, & physician assistants/ associates. They may have a discount link somewhere in the info section. Osmosis is great too, but I try to watch what I can for free. I am not affiliated with any of these programs, but you will need to take charge of your learning. This is what worked for me.