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Why do some nurses hate it in others pump at work?

Nurses   (15,740 Views | 104 Replies)

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

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I don't get that, either. When my kids were babies you couldn't do this at work and she is just pumping, not like asking another nurse to cover for her to make a Taco Bell run. Does the other nurse have kids? Maybe her perception is that new parents ask too much. That being said why wouldn't regular staff step up.

Regular staff might not be stepping up because the pumper in question has been abusing them. It happens.

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17 Posts; 756 Profile Views

This doesn't seem fair to me at all. Mothers have the right to do what is best for their children

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KRVRN is a BSN, RN and specializes in NICU.

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Well pumping isn't something that you can say "Oh, the unit is crazy today, I just won't take any pumping breaks..."

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3 Followers; 4,560 Posts; 35,718 Profile Views

This is not a problem in UK, nurses can have up to 1 year off for maternity leave so the issue should never arise.

And yes, I am crowing just a bit.:whistling::sarcastic::cheeky::roflmao:

And for those who breastfeed for more than a year?

Of course, during the year, they could store up a frozen supply. How long is frozen milk good?

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3 Followers; 4,560 Posts; 35,718 Profile Views

This doesn't seem fair to me at all. Mothers have the right to do what is best for their children

The right or the responsibility? And in a country that still doesn't seem all that supportive of breastfeeding? And is it one person's duty to help someone else "do what is best" for the other's kids? Perhaps ethically and morally there is a duty. but legally? Not so sure about that at all.

Most people are all for doing right by children. The trouble is that staffing is so poor in so many settings these days that it really can be tremendously burdensome to cover for anyone else - even for just a bathroom break, let alone breast pumping, especially if the pumping takes much time (more than 20 minutes or so) and especially if the pumper also takes meal and coffee breaks. And maybe the reliever hasn't had any breaks.

Human nature being what it is, people sometimes get jealous or resentful because someone else is getting "extra" breaks.

OP - what was the result with the traveler?

Also, define "covering". Should it not include handling the results of having given Mag Citrate? Or giving pain meds? Or anything beyond making sure the patients are still among the living?

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66 Posts; 2,173 Profile Views

I don't blame her... it's irritating when someone rushes off to pump and is gone for hours at a time. But it's the same with people that smoke and such. They just mysteriously vanish at various points throughout the day and when they pop back up again (at their convenience) they're always like, "But I have to pump! My BABY." Yes, I understand your child needs to eat, but maybe consider formula? I'm not against a mother's right to nourish her child and I don't have anything against breastfeeding, but it's unfair for others to have to continually cover someone at work because they cannot manage their time wisely and chose to have a tiny infant. I have a ton of compassion, but I have been worn down by others "running off" to pump and leaving me alone to pick up the slack.

The travel nurse didn't handle it right, but I honestly can't blame them for getting huffy.

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66 Posts; 2,173 Profile Views

The right or the responsibility? And in a country that still doesn't seem all that supportive of breastfeeding? And is it one person's duty to help someone else "do what is best" for the other's kids? Perhaps ethically and morally there is a duty. but legally? Not so sure about that at all.

Most people are all for doing right by children. The trouble is that staffing is so poor in so many settings these days that it really can be tremendously burdensome to cover for anyone else - even for just a bathroom break, let alone breast pumping, especially if the pumping takes much time (more than 20 minutes or so) and especially if the pumper also takes meal and coffee breaks. And maybe the reliever hasn't had any breaks.

Human nature being what it is, people sometimes get jealous or resentful because someone else is getting "extra" breaks.

OP - what was the result with the traveler?

Also, define "covering". Should it not include handling the results of having given Mag Citrate? Or giving pain meds? Or anything beyond making sure the patients are still among the living?

I think you've really hit the nail on the head here. Hospitals and places alike are so understaffed these days. We need all the help we can get. I'm fortunate enough now to work in a place where it's not that big of an issue (at least, not as bad as it could be), but even so, I have worked in places where I have seen situations like this happen time and time again.

The co-worker that needs a smoke break every other minute and is constantly nowhere to be found...

The c-worker that needs to pump who disappears...

The co-worker that has issues with her feet that needs a few more breaks than normal...

The co-worker that leaves often because she always has to go pick up her kids...

If these people aren't there, then someone else has to pick up their slack. It isn't fair. I know that life happens, babies are born, people get addicted to nicotine and sometimes people need more breaks throughout the day. But it's still unfair that someone has to cover these people. It's really frustrating.

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OyWithThePoodles has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Med-surg, school nursing..

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I pumped three times during a 12 hour shift, for about 15 minutes each time. While doing this I would be charting at the same time. I would also get regular phone calls on my work phone. I even had doctors come in to chat about patients because apparently my privacy wasn't nearly as important.

By law, workplaces HAVE to let you pump, and offer a place that is not a bathroom. That said, they do not have to pay you. They can make you clock out. Also, by law you have to be offered a break (more than one actually) during your shift. If you do not take your break, that is your decision. I never took a regular break, but when I pumped I made time. I certainly took less time that the smokers who went off the floor every couple of hours.

Some people abuse it, which is frustrating. At one point we had three nurses pumping, so we all had to arrange our pump times. If someone is abusing that time (taking WAY too long) speak with them about it, if nothing is done, speak with the boss. I bet if they were made to clock out that pump time would be cut down considerably.

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Pixie.RN has 12 years experience as a MSN, RN, EMT-P and specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN.

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If someone is abusing that time (taking WAY too long) speak with them about it, if nothing is done, speak with the boss. I bet if they were made to clock out that pump time would be cut down considerably.

This is excellent advice! And how long does it take them to pump?! When I was pumping (before my recent cardiomyopathy event and being placed on meds that pretty much killed my breast milk supply and weren't safe with breastfeeding), I could do both sides in 15-20 minutes. Geez. Is that abnormal? I've only had the one experience with pumping, so is an hour as crazy as it sounds?

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OyWithThePoodles has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Med-surg, school nursing..

1 Follower; 1,289 Posts; 12,093 Profile Views

I pumped for about 15 minutes. Or until I got my second letdown, sometimes that would happen after 10 minutes and I would thank my lucky stars because it meant I could get back to work. I never took more than 15 minutes, but I also never left a mess for my co-workers. I always made sure my patients were medicated and comfortable before going.

Like I said, I charted, took calls, and did not get the privacy needed, so pretty much not a break lol

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560 Posts; 8,987 Profile Views

There are two sides to every story, and I wouldn't make any assumptions or judgement calls until hearing both sides. Especially since there are many reasons why a nurse might have a problem covering for a pumping coworker.

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379 Posts; 5,017 Profile Views

By law, workplaces HAVE to let you pump, and offer a place that is not a bathroom. That said, they do not have to pay you. They can make you clock out. Also, by law you have to be offered a break (more than one actually) during your shift.

The laws actually vary state to state. I live & work in TX, and employers DO NOT HAVE TO OFFER BREAKS or LUNCH BREAKS. I have never know one not to, but, they have the law on their side.

Texas is bound by Breastfeeding federal laws, however.

Edited by rn1965
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