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Why is BSN required for CRNA?

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by MM1989 MM1989 (New) New

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On 12/17/2019 at 6:14 PM, MM1989 said:

I’m working on my RN and plan to go to CRNA school. I’ve noticed that a few CRNA schools will allow you to have a bachelors in other science areas, as long as you are an RN. But the best school seem to require a BSN. Why is that? Why is an easy, relatively useless, easy to obtain degree required over something like a bachelors in chemistry? 

I want to start off with wishing you good luck in your journey for CRNA school. Like many other posters I find many issues with your initial statement. 

First yes BSN is very important and essential to become a successful SRNA student/provider. You may view these classes as useless, but they are the cornerstone of the profession. Those courses that are more then likely viewed as useless for the cornerstone courses are essential such how to critically analyze research, since the profession is built on a plethora of research. In addition, communication and collaboration is the cornerstone to create the best and safest plan of care. 

I will say attitude is essential to getting into CRNA programs. For every spot there is 10 applicants. If the initial attitude is the uselessness of the Bachelors degree there are 9 other people who will get that spot over you. I hesitantly would advise that is chemistry and science classes are the upmost important aspect of anesthesia you may want to consider Anesthesia Assistant over CRNA. I promise you I mean no malice or cruelness, but another profespctive form someone in the field. 

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MunoRN has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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13 minutes ago, Minn_RN said:

I want to start off with wishing you good luck in your journey for CRNA school. Like many other posters I find many issues with your initial statement. 

First yes BSN is very important and essential to become a successful SRNA student/provider. You may view these classes as useless, but they are the cornerstone of the profession. Those courses that are more then likely viewed as useless for the cornerstone courses are essential such how to critically analyze research, since the profession is built on a plethora of research. In addition, communication and collaboration is the cornerstone to create the best and safest plan of care. 

I will say attitude is essential to getting into CRNA programs. For every spot there is 10 applicants. If the initial attitude is the uselessness of the Bachelors degree there are 9 other people who will get that spot over you. I hesitantly would advise that is chemistry and science classes are the upmost important aspect of anesthesia you may want to consider Anesthesia Assistant over CRNA. I promise you I mean no malice or cruelness, but another profespctive form someone in the field. 

I don't think the OP was suggesting pursuing a CRNA without first becoming an RN or having a bachelor's degree, or that chemistry isn't important in becoming a CRNA since they were asking about pursuing a CRNA with a bachelor's degree in chemistry.

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schrist1374 is a BSN, DNP, CRNA and specializes in Anesthesia.

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Hello! A BSN is required because a CRNA is an advanced nursing degree. Many CRNAs I know have a BS in chemistry or biology, and do an accelerated BSN. Then the critical care experience prior to CRNA school. If you have any questions please feel free to PM me. I’d love to talk about anesthesia 

Dr. Christ, DNAP-CRNA

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NutmeggeRN has 25 years experience as a BSN and specializes in kids.

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1 hour ago, MunoRN said:

I don't think the OP was suggesting pursuing a CRNA without first becoming an RN or having a bachelor's degree, or that chemistry isn't important in becoming a CRNA since they were asking about pursuing a CRNA with a bachelor's degree in chemistry.

"But the best school seem to require a BSN. Why is that? Why is an easy, relatively useless, easy to obtain degree required over something like a bachelors in chemistry?"

She states a BSN is easy and useless...

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ArmyRntoMD has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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Well it’s easy, that’s for sure. I wouldn’t say USELESS, since some jobs and educations require it. Maybe he means useless as in the education it provides in practicality? My BSN was a waste of my time.

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15 minutes ago, NutmeggeRN said:

"But the best school seem to require a BSN. Why is that? Why is an easy, relatively useless, easy to obtain degree required over something like a bachelors in chemistry?"

She states a BSN is easy and useless...

I apologize for my comment and didn't realize the OP has a chemistry degree. Words for wisdom you will have to shine in other aspects. Having just your AA of nursing will put you ad a disadvantage in the application pool. I would advise to find other ways to shine and highlight yourself. 

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MunoRN has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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14 minutes ago, NutmeggeRN said:

"But the best school seem to require a BSN. Why is that? Why is an easy, relatively useless, easy to obtain degree required over something like a bachelors in chemistry?"

She states a BSN is easy and useless...

I don't disagree with the OP's point that obtaining a bachelor's degree in chemistry in addition to what I presume would be an ADN, rather than an RN-to-BSN is going to be more useful in becoming a CRNA.  

And yes, RN-to-BSN programs are pretty universally described as being both easy and of little practical use in nursing practice, they tend to be mainly composed of redundant busy work, with the primary purpose being to justify the credit hours required to charge for the tuition.  I'm a liaison between my facility and the local nursing programs, which includes an RN-to-BSN programs, and the faculty of the RN-to-BSN program generally agrees that they program is "easy and useless", although they probably wouldn't use that phrasing.

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juniper222 has 2 years experience and specializes in Pre Nursing.

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2 minutes ago, MunoRN said:

I don't disagree with the OP's point that obtaining a bachelor's degree in chemistry in addition to what I presume would be an ADN, rather than an RN-to-BSN is going to be more useful in becoming a CRNA.  

And yes, RN-to-BSN programs are pretty universally described as being both easy and of little practical use in nursing practice, they tend to be mainly composed of redundant busy work, with the primary purpose being to justify the credit hours required to charge for the tuition.  I'm a liaison between my facility and the local nursing programs, which includes an RN-to-BSN programs, and the faculty of the RN-to-BSN program generally agrees that they program is "easy and useless", although they probably wouldn't use that phrasing.

I would suggest "expensive and time consuming" over "easy and useless"😀

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ArmyRntoMD has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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It’s a special kind of hell. Expensive, redundant and taught by nurses with chips on their shoulders. I loved the email “Please everybody stop addressing me as Mrs. I am DOCTOR so and so. I worked hard to earn this title and you will address me as so!” I guess when you can’t be called a doctor in a hospital you will make everyone call you one online lol. Meanwhile some of the physicians I work with are “Chris(tina), Mark, John, and Charlie”. Rarely does one stop me and say “ITS DOCTOR SO AND SO!” 
🤣 cmon. Get over yourself 

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MunoRN has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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8 minutes ago, juniper222 said:

I would suggest "expensive and time consuming" over "easy and useless"😀

That's a fair point, just because a program isn't academically rigorous doesn't mean it's "easy" when you consider how much of your time it consumes.

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juniper222 has 2 years experience and specializes in Pre Nursing.

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If the doctors call you by your first name the reverse should be OK.  I will call the ones I respect Dr. (if we are on a first name basis) when in front of their superiors to make them look good.  Was on a first name basis with many Dr. at my school and if the dean came by it was "Dr".  As a general rule one should be called by their highest accolade unless they go to first name.  But how many Dr. call you RN Smith anyway?🙄

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ArmyRntoMD has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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They ask me to call them by their first name. And usually have the patients do the same. 
And yeah in front of other doctors I would call them doctor so and so. Just like in the military. As soon as an officer walked up, Mike became “Sergeant Kraemer” etc. 

Its not even the fact they wanted us to call them “doctor” but the fact that it bothered them SO much that they sent a mass scathing email. Pretty pathetic. 

Edited by ArmyRntoMD

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