Jump to content

LouDogg BSN, RN

SRNA, ICU and Emergency Mursing

CRNA Hopeful.... Aspires to pass gas professionally.

Member Member Nurse Student
  • Joined:
  • Last Visited:
  • 598

    Content

  • 0

    Articles

  • 8,707

    Visitors

  • 2

    Followers

  • 0

    Points

LouDogg has 4 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in SRNA, ICU and Emergency Mursing.

...

LouDogg's Latest Activity

  1. LouDogg

    Thomas Jefferson 2020

    I’m sorry to hear that, but don’t be too discouraged.... there are simply too many qualified applicants to let in everyone each round. Doesn’t mean you don’t have what it takes. Keep trying. Apply ANYWHERE and everywhere. When I was applying, I was also becoming fluent in Spanish so I could apply in Puerto Rico... and I was getting ready to take the GRE to open my university options... Fortunately I got into Jeff, but I was ready to go further to make myself a better candidate and broaden my horizon of opportunity... and I’m almost 40-years-old, so it’s not like I had endless time to do this... It may take that level of dedication. But if you want it bad enough, you’ll make it happen. best of luck to all of you
  2. LouDogg

    Thomas Jefferson 2020

    IcuRN, Could be... The change was a few months ago... The staff is the same, however. The directorship only changed hands... I was in the priority deadline app period of 2018, but chose my interview for January 29 2019. I got my acceptance that day, but there were still a few spots left. They have been busy with clinical placements, and we only got our sites finalized last week... I expect, they should be letting you guys know about decisions soon. I’m sure the anxiousness is palpable, but sit tight. Good Luck!!!!
  3. LouDogg

    Thomas Jefferson 2020

    I can’t remember. I think it was just a couple weeks, if that, from the time you get accepted. And there are two separate deposit dates, so people may back out after the first deposit but before the second. Quite a few people rejected offers in our cohort, and some rejections were near the starting day (long after both deposits were made). So yes, they may call you a few weeks/days before the semester starts, it’s possible. And, being on the waitlist, I think you’ll also be in a better position for a spot next year because they will forward your app to the top of the pile for the following cohort (talk to them about it, not exactly sure how it works)
  4. LouDogg

    Thomas Jefferson 2020

    Sorry to hear that. Cumulative GPA is hard to raise because it requires a lot of units to counter the established record. I can only recommend to take courses to raise your GPA, get high GRE scores, or look into Puerto Rico. I’ve heard it’s easier to get in, but you need the GRE and need to speak Spanish (this is a good idea if you’re fluent already). It’s very inexpensive there also. The whole program in PR costs less than a semester at Jeff. And Jeff is 9 semesters... In taking more classes, If I we’re in your spot, I would look into a MHCA. Administration is great money and the degree will boost your GPA so you’ll be a better candidate for the DNP-Anesthesia later. I dont see a point in an NP degree or MSN unless you just want to book at your GPA. But I think the MHCA can set you up for huge positions as you’re career develops. Just a thought... but you’ll have to do what’s best for you. Your GPA is not horrible, but you will have to expand your horizons and just apply to every school you qualify for with an open application period. Jeff is more competitive that some, maybe not as competitive as others.... you’ll just have to keep trying. I think the application essays play a large part in being selected, so maybe look at that element as well (I have no idea, maybe yours is great already, just a thought) I wish you the best of luck... you’ll make it happen if you want it bad enough. Remember, If it was easy, everyone would be doing it.
  5. LouDogg

    Thomas Jefferson 2020

    Not sure exactly how it goes... I know they invite a few people to interview from the previous year’s waitlist if they reapply/have their apps pushed to the following year. It seems they keep a couple spots saved for waitlisted students from the previous year. But someone who was waitlisted and then accepted would have more details then me Oh... and they obviously call waitlist students if the selected people give up their seats.
  6. LouDogg

    Thomas Jefferson 2020

    The student housing apartments are expensive, if that’s what you mean. You’re better off finding your own spot... in my opinion. The first semester is almost 100% online. You have to go to campus for orientation and to take two exams—if I remember correctly. There may have been something else we had to attend, I can’t remember. I think that’s it. The second semester will be in-class two days a week, plus you have to come for a Patient Assessment class about 4 times throughout the semester for practice assessments and assessment exams with actors. I pretty sure that in third semester you have two days in class and one clinical day per week.
  7. LouDogg

    Thomas Jefferson 2020

    No I did not. You do not start clinical until the third semester. And you are not assigned a home-site until a few weeks before it starts. How it looks now, we will have our sites by middle of second semester-ish... maybe.. it’s a complicated process for them, so it takes time I got a place pretty close to campus because I knew I’d be in class the first few semesters (the first semester is almost all online though. You only go to campus about 5 times for exams and orientation) Most of the sites are relatively close to campus as well. Also, you will be going to several different sites to complete your required variety of specialty rotations, so a central location is not a bad choice. Public transportation is good so you can find a lot of good places to live that are not in the center, and take the train in. Depends on your personal situation/preferences. There are nice towns in New Jersey that are cheaper and also along the train lines that make getting to class easy, but then you may end up very far from a clinical site. I think being closer to campus is easier. And If you have less than a three-year lease, you can always change your mind... you’ll be out here for a while
  8. LouDogg

    Thomas Jefferson 2020

    I never took the GRE, which was a major reason that I applied to Jeff. And I got in, so it’s definitely not a requirement or even helpful that I can see... But it will definitely open the door for you to apply to many more programs as it is a common requirement. And while you can get past that requirement with a high GPA at some programs, its mandatory for all applicants at many more
  9. LouDogg

    Thomas Jefferson 2020

    Sorry to hear that. But congratulations on your Penn interview!!! Regardless of the outcome, you have to just keep the effort going. You’re almost there
  10. LouDogg

    Is this a breach?

    How I see it: No violation on your part. Possibly a violation on the part of the MA who told you about it (I assume you are not in the group text), as there was no reason for that MA to share private information about another patient if they/you are not part of the case and it's not pertinent to their/your job in medical care. You're safe, they may not be. They may tell you that YOU should have told the MA not to share the information; and possibly that you should have reported that MA. But I don't see how your actions were a HIPAA violation. Let us know how it goes. We have ideas of how this works, but it's very helpful to learn from cases where the answers are not so obvious. Thanks for sharing.
  11. LouDogg

    Discussion at nurse's station

    I see now, Anonymous RN is a case worker, not the bedside nurse. OK. Doesn't change much here. Anonymous RN said that the family is refusing to allow the patient to receive pain meds. You would need some control over the case to be able to make that demand, so I assumed. Also said that the granddaughter was the caregiver. That would make the family privy to all med information. But if not, that's fine, my mistake, still doesn't change much here either. If they are not in control, then obviously they are not privileged to medical files, record, diagnoses, insurance information, etc.... However, none of that private medical information was shared with the family--only the fact that the Charge nurse was "venting" about this horrible family, the Anonymous RN was "supporting" it, and apparently, it all got let out of bag and the family got word of it.... which is not HIPAA protected. Should that RN have been eavesdropping? No. Should eavesdropping that RN have brought it to his superior? Maybe if it bothered him that much Was it illegal? No, he could easily say the conversation was loud, make up a reason for being in the area (even if he says he though he forgot something over there, or whatever) or passing by; and he can say he can't help overhearing something. Short of having recorded your decibel levels, you can't argue the weasel's argument. (he said/she said) Just playing devils advocate here. I don't agree with the RN's actions. I think that's a weasel thing to do. I also do not see a legal issue in his actions, definitely not HIPAA. The walls have ears and eyes. Go to a separate room/outside if you need a truly private conversation--if only to protect yourself. Gossip gets around a hospital faster than a Daytona 500 race. I have no dog in this fight, just my 2 cents. If he gets charged and convicted of a HIPAA violation, let us know.
  12. LouDogg

    Discussion at nurse's station

    That’s not a HIPAA violations as far as I see it. It was gossip that got back to the person being gossiped about. I didn't read that the RN shared diagnoses, Social security numbers, addresses, or other personal data with someone who was not supposed to have that information. Especially considering it sounds like the family has some power of attorney overseeing care. The family is privy to all medical discussions (but that was smack talk, not a medical talk) It was an overheard convo of grievances against the family. That’s not a HIPAA violation. HIPAA is the illegal sharing of pertinent private patient records/information with those not allowed to have it. Last I checked, sh** talking about the family was not listed in the HIPAA protected information. Not saying what happened was cool, but I do not see anything illegal. Just people got busted talking smack about the patient’s family, not the patient, and the family got wind of it. Careful where you open your mouth... the walls have ears... unless that RN was sharing patient records, SSN, insurance, diagnosis, or other medical information with outside people, I don’t see a crime. Sucks, likely not good for hospital relations, but not a criminal act. I’m interested to see how it plays out. I doubt the RN will have any legal repercussions. He can just say he overheard you talking smack against his friends at the nursing station, and he told them. The volume of your voice is debatable and he is allowed to be there, apparently. He can also say he informed them because he was worried hostile environment would create a lack of proper care for his friend’s family, and that’s why he wanted them to know. I think you downplayed a little those grievance words your charge used about the family, and maybe your “supportive” replies that got heard too. (I’ve been a nurse for a while) But that’s not info about the patient, that’s info about staff not liking the family. I assume it was a lot of very not-nice things the charge was saying (and maybe warranted, as it sounds like the family was horrible). And that smack talk got back to the family. Unfortunately, that’s just gossip, not HIPAA, from what I’m reading here. Now you really have to be really careful because the family can make a case for malpractice from discrimination if something goes bad with the patient. There is documented hostility between the Charge Nurse of the Unit and Staff RNs, against the patient’s family. Gotta step up your game even more now and hope you can get out of this case without legal issues. I would lay low and not poke the bear... this all started with an inappropriate conversation. Technically that charge should share grievances with his/her superior or HR. Or you discuss outside the hospital—not a charge RN trash-talking a family at the nurses station with the staff RNs that are caring for the patient. That looks bad for you guys. Just try to let this just pass. and find a new job, for crying out loud
  13. LouDogg

    Discussion at nurse's station

    I’m a little lost. Where was the HIPAA violation? Note: I’m not defending anyone, just trying to figure it out
  14. LouDogg

    Why is BSN required for CRNA?

    Again with tangents... nobody is talking about what’s best for bedside nursing.
  15. LouDogg

    Why is BSN required for CRNA?

    Speak for yourself... I think the programs make a difference. Furthermore, as an educator, I can say that the student gets out what they put into their own education. Two people can take the same course and comprehend/be able to apply completely different amounts of the material. And guess what a DNP degree is... (and I speak from experience, wuffy) ...a ton of managerial crap, leadership, sociology, more epidemiology, more research, patient quality, health safety, etc.... and you do a crap load of skills labs and rotations. Again, this is where I feel the BSN prepares you for a CRNA program better than a chemistry degree or any other random bachelor degree. (if you didn’t just get your BSN from the beginning) And that’s why I believe many places require a BSN, rather than a chem degree, for a DNP-Anesthesia program. (Remember the original thread)
  16. LouDogg

    Why is BSN required for CRNA?

    Sorry, the RN MD guy had me all twisted going on tangents about his special class of research. And then you quoted me and I wasn’t sure what part of the conversation you were quoting. And I should not have mentioned Patho, that was incorrect. The extra clinical, projects, courses I was referring to were community health, research, leadership, and nursing capstone—mine was gerontology. And the RN students had to do everything we had to (clinical, exams, etc). There was another, but I’ve been up for about 35 hours now and can’t remember. But those aforementioned courses have been more pertinent to my first SRNA semester than anything else I’ve encountered this far. And we just took the chem course, it has nothing upper level. I took LESS than college level chem, <101, as my RN prerequisite; and I got an A in the SRNA chem course. This is why I feel that a further nursing education, even if it’s “easier” than a chem degree, is more pertinent to a CRNA program. This is an opinion question, that’s my opinion. And I’m in a pretty good position to comment on the topic at hand. But of course, you are welcome to your opinion as well. I don’t think upper-level chem would have been of any value to me, personally. I feel more prepared with the BSN.
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.