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Why is BSN required for CRNA?

Nurses   (12,520 Views | 196 Replies)
by MM1989 MM1989 (New) New

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NutmeggeRN has 25 years experience as a BSN and specializes in kids.

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57 minutes ago, Horseshoe said:

This isn't a problem associated only with the BSN. It is a problem of US education in general. What you are complaining about can be observed across all disciplines. I follow several message boards that have a generally well educated membership. The poor writing you referenced isn't unique to BSN graduates. Name the bachelor's degree-the degree holder is just as likely to be guilty of poor writing, spelling mistakes, and incorrect grammar as any BSN grad. I know medical doctors whose writing is embarrassingly bad. They will even admit to it. They explain that they focus on the "important things," like the hard sciences. As long as their meaning is conveyed, they couldn't care less about too or two, their or there.

I don't know when teachers quit teaching basic English grammar in elementary and secondary schools in the US, but at some point it seems they did. If our students cannot master such simple concepts as when to use there vs. their vs. they're and your and you're, what in the world would make us imagine that they could churn out coherent and cogent term papers and research articles in college?

By the way, while I usually get the basics right, I occasionally spot a typo or other error in my writing when I go back and read my prior posts. There may be one or more in this very post. It can also be observed in the writing of those who can deliver "doctoral level" papers while still in undergrad. Your post above contains several errors. I always find it amusing when people make errors in a post complaining about the writing errors of other members.

The arrogance you display in your posts here will not serve you well in life. The degree one holds (or does not hold) does not necessarily reflect the actual raw intelligence of the individual. Once you have completed your MD program and residency requirements, you won't necessarily be the smartest person in the room at any given time. For all you know, the transport fellow or the housekeeper emptying your trash may actually have a higher IQ than you do. Life circumstances don't always allow the best and brightest to obtain formal education. Respect the contributions of the people around you and don't listen to that inner voice that apparently keeps telling you how superior you are.

 

Bravo!

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subee has 48 years experience as a MSN, CRNA and specializes in CRNA, Finally retired.

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21 hours ago, Megarline said:

The school wants money. Lol. Jk. It depends really in each institution. In some  nursing school in universities, general chem, biochemistry, and other kind of chemistry are required. They even required maths that are beyond college algebra. So, it depends what they prescribed. Not all schools are the same but almost identical general education with other disciplines.They did accept an ample of my courses from a non nursing degree. Classes I needed were pretty much all about the human body, biochemistry, nutrition, and other relevant courses. 

Why classes like sociology and fine arts are requirements to graduate? 

 

Because it is a LIBERAL ARTS education.  It separates trade school from acollege degree.  Are we over-educating nurses?  I do wrestle with that question sometimes, but if we want to call ourselves a "profession" then a bachelor's degree is a baseline requirement.  The practices and cultures of healcare are changing faster than we can keep up.  If we can't produce nurses who are leaders rather than followers, things will never improve.  The forces of the medical industrial complex will simply run over us because we don't have enough people to react to the forces which diminish us.  That's why we study things like sociology - it's all a part of the big picture.  

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ArmyRntoMD has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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11 hours ago, AlwaysLearning247 said:

You do know that you will need a couple years of critical care experience. I’m not sure where you’re from, but getting right out of nursing school into a critical care role is rare, especially without a BSN. Good luck. 

Is it? I went straight from school to a step down unit with a diploma degree. 

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cwilliams032 has 1 years experience.

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Lol, what?

Are you trolling us?

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ArmyRntoMD has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

314 Posts; 712 Profile Views

3 hours ago, NutmeggeRN said:

Bravo!

Oh I often have typos. It’s because I’m not going to bother double checking something on an Internet forum. But if I was submitting this for review? Sure there is STILL probably an error after I review it and post it for grading. However, not with such glaring errors that makes one wonder if it was written by a school child. And I actually respect everyone I meet. I’m very nice to the CNAs and janitors. But when you’re in a profession that is expanding their practice, I expect a little higher. These students never should’ve gotten their BSN. If a janitor has a high IQ, good on him/her! 

We had a janitor at a hospital I worked at that if I could guess, was a savant. Respected the hell out of the guy. Diligent worker, and we would have conversations about all sorts of science and technology. You don’t find people often that you can have those types of discussions with. Ah. 

6 minutes ago, cwilliams032 said:

Lol, what?

Are you trolling us?

No. I just don’t understand what the problem with expecting more of RN education is. RN is a crucial, and well respected profession. Why not continue to increase the scientific education expectations? Not trying to rant, but I don’t utter a word of this in person. I just smile and go along with all of the stepford wives I work with, and have been holding it in for years. Had to let it out.

Edited by ArmyRntoMD

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4 hours ago, Horseshoe said:

This isn't a problem associated only with the BSN. It is a problem of US education in general. What you are complaining about can be observed across all disciplines. I follow several message boards that have a generally well educated membership. The poor writing you referenced isn't unique to BSN graduates. Name the bachelor's degree-the degree holder is just as likely to be guilty of poor writing, spelling mistakes, and incorrect grammar as any BSN grad. I know medical doctors whose writing is embarrassingly bad. They will even admit to it. They explain that they focus on the "important things," like the hard sciences. As long as their meaning is conveyed, they couldn't care less about too or two, their or there.

I don't know when teachers quit teaching basic English grammar in elementary and secondary schools in the US, but at some point it seems they did. If our students cannot master such simple concepts as when to use there vs. their vs. they're and your and you're, what in the world would make us imagine that they could churn out coherent and cogent term papers and research articles in college?

By the way, while I usually get the basics right, I occasionally spot a typo or other error in my writing when I go back and read my prior posts. There may be one or more in this very post. It can also be observed in the writing of those who can deliver "doctoral level" papers while still in undergrad. Your post above contains several errors. I always find it amusing when people make errors in a post complaining about the writing errors of other members.

The arrogance you display in your posts here will not serve you well in life. The degree one holds (or does not hold) does not necessarily reflect the actual raw intelligence of the individual. Once you have completed your MD program and residency requirements, you won't necessarily be the smartest person in the room at any given time. For all you know, the transport fellow or the housekeeper emptying your trash may actually have a higher IQ than you do. Life circumstances don't always allow the best and brightest to obtain formal education. Respect the contributions of the people around you and don't listen to that inner voice that apparently keeps telling you how superior you are.

 

Growing up with a poor family was not an easy task and being maltreated by my own family was way painful than eating alone on special occasions and regular nights. I had to do almost everything for everyone. I was fed up of people taking over my life. I was too young to take over an adult responsibility which I did for a short period of time.

People might say  I'm a narcissistic person for leaving them behind. My family often called me "selfish" for consistently and persistently declining their advances that they want to buy ... because their neighbors bought this and that. I clearly told them to buy things they want and want to have. 

They can't milk me, they don't want to do anything with me. I'm happy though. My life is not impacted when they aren't around. In fact, it's a lot easier. I'm indeed tired of people who do stupid things over and over again expect me to come and clean up their mess. They can continuously having babies. I'm out. I can't see things, and I'm all good. I can focus in my education nowadays.

The man who cleans the trash and floor like I used to do is probably having my life in the past.

 

 

Edited by Megarline

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ArmyRntoMD has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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4 minutes ago, Megarline said:

Growing up with a poor family was not an easy task and being maltreated by my own family was way painful than eating alone on special occasions and regular nights. I had to do almost everything for everyone. I was fed up of people taking over my life. I was too young to take over an adult responsibility which I did for a short period of time.

People might say  I'm a narcissistic person for leaving them behind. My family often called me "selfish" for consistently and persistently declining their advances that they want to buy ... because their neighbors bought this and that. I clearly told them to buy things they want and want to have. 

They can't milk me, they don't want to do anything with me. I'm happy though. My life is not impacted when they aren't around. In fact, it's a lot easier. I'm indeed tired of people who do stupid things over and over again expect me to come and clean up their mess. They can continuously having babies. I'm out. I can't see things, and I'm all good. I can focus in my education nowadays.

 

 

This is healthy. Sounds just like my situation. While my fathers side are all highly educated PHDs with their sh together, my mothers side out of 5 siblings not a single one even has a bachelors degree. Lots of blight on this side, dope heads, I have a cousin that’s a stripper, it’s really embarrassing. I’ve basically avoided that side of the family like the plague. 

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Rose_Queen has 15 years experience as a BSN, MSN, RN and specializes in OR, education.

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41 minutes ago, ArmyRntoMD said:

Is it? I went straight from school to a step down unit with a diploma degree. 

Certain areas and facilities this may happen. In others, you can’t even get an interview without a BSN. Just because it happened for you doesn’t make it a universal experience. 

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ArmyRntoMD has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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I suppose. How could they ever take care of patients without theatre, disaster nursing, and community nursing? 🤣

And you get a whopping .50 an hour raise. So considering an RN to BSN runs around 11,000$, it will pay for itself in only about 12 years! 

Edited by ArmyRntoMD

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9 minutes ago, ArmyRntoMD said:

I suppose. How could they ever take care of patients without theatre, disaster nursing, and community nursing? 🤣

And you get a whopping .50 an hour raise. So considering an RN to BSN runs around 11,000$, it will pay for itself in only about 12 years! 

I don't think my salary has ever reflected having gone for my BSN. It paid for itself in that I have gotten jobs I wouldn't have gotten with the ASN.

For me personally, getting a BSN was a no-brainer. I already had a bachelor's degree in another field, so all those general credits and science classes transferred to the nursing degree. It was only a difference of one semester extra to get the BSN, so it made sense to just go ahead and do it. Under different circumstances, I might well have opted to go the straight ADN route.

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ArmyRntoMD has 6 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care.

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I guess we’re spoiled where I am. I don’t know of any jobs outside of travel or the military that require a BSN. I got mine solely for the medschool requirement. 

Pay at the hospital I work at is pretty good though, if you snag extra shifts, which I used to do before I was in school full time. 

 

For me (a 4 year nurse) 

Nursing base pay 27.50/hr

5.00/ hr night shift diff

3.25/ hr afternoon shift diff

5.50/ hr weekend diff 

Time and a half over 40 hrs

10.00 per hr shift diff for emergency pay (every shift picked up) 

20.00 per hr shift diff for double emergency pay (semi rare now, used to be very common) 

30.00 per hr extra shift diff for triple emergency pay (super rare almost unheard of. Only picked up 3 of these in my career)

 

Another way they get you, is the BSN isn’t included in your pay, but tacked on. So you don’t get time and a half etc on it. 

Still wont complain about pay. You can easily make six figures right out of school with a two year degree. That’s pretty awesome. Some of my coworkers complain about pay, I wish they knew what it was like to pack around 100 lb of rattle in the desert with the chances of getting shot at or blown up, ALL for maybe 38,000 a year. (Tax free though which is nice)

 

Edited by ArmyRntoMD

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2 minutes ago, ArmyRntoMD said:

I guess we’re spoiled where I am. I don’t know of any jobs outside of travel or the military that require a BSN. I got mine solely for the medschool requirement. 

 

It's very location specific. In some areas, not having your BSN is absolutely no impediment whatsoever to working wherever you want. In other places, you're working in the nursing home and can just forget about your cath lab (or other hospital based) aspirations.

 

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