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White Coat Ceremony for Nurses

Updated | Posted

Specializes in Oncology; medical specialty website.

blondy2061h, MSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology. Has 15 years experience.

Dumb. I think white coats should go the way of the dodo. With everyone from nursing to social work to PT to pharmacy wearing one it means nothing. They just serve as germ carries. Seriously, filthy. If you want a ceremony to welcome new grads to the profession, have a pining ceremony.

MurseJJ

Specializes in Neurosurgery, Neurology.

Well, a number of health professional schools have had white coat ceremonies for some time besides medical students, such as pharmacy schools, physical therapy schools, podiatry schools, and physician assistant schools. Before I read the article, I thought it was about APN students (which I could understand), but it's for the BSN students. I don't really understand the point. Will these students be wearing the white coats in clinicals?

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

I think that both caps and white coats are germ carriers and should be abolished. Pins can also be a hazaard in the workplace.

They can do a ceremony without any of those things.

ButterflyRN90

Specializes in Renal and Telemetry. Has 5 years experience.

I thought it was beautiful 🙂

My class had a pinning ceremony. That's all anyone needs, IMHO.

White coats? Anyone and everyone wears those. A friend completing a PA program had a WC ceremony. A friend's kid did a healthcare class in high school....and wore a white lab coat. How is this at all a special thing for nurses?

Stick with pinning ;)

MurseJJ

Specializes in Neurosurgery, Neurology.

My initial undergrad school has a summer abroad program in Argentina where students do research in respiratory disorders, then shadow doctors and nurses in the field. They always take a class pic of everyone wearing a long white coat and one of those cheap stethoscopes around their necks.

BostonFNP, APRN

Specializes in Adult Internal Medicine. Has 10 years experience.

Maybe with more men in nursing now they are trying to be more unisex?

meanmaryjean, DNP, RN

Specializes in NICU, ICU, PICU, Academia. Has 40 years experience.

COB opinion: Bring back the nurses' cap!

meanmaryjean said:
COB opinion: Bring back the nurses' cap!

Yeah....most men in nursing really enjoy wearing theirs....!

Far as I'm concerned, save the white coats for the physicians, nurses should stick with the white cap for this ceremony.

OCNRN63, RN

Specializes in Oncology; medical specialty website.

meanmaryjean said:
COB opinion: Bring back the nurses' cap!

Yay! I love you! ;)

Back in the day it was scrub envy, now it seems nursing has a thing for white coats. How strange so many in the profession have a deep visceral response against wearing caps supposedly because they "spread germs", but are perfectly happy wearing and or advocating a garment that is likely truly contaminated and worse comes in closer contact with patients and everyone else.

Then again white coats were once the exclusive domain of physicians along with scrubs for that matter (except for L&D and OR nursing staff and perhaps CC units), so you can see where this is going.

llg said:
I think that both caps and white coats are germ carriers and should be abolished. Pins can also be a hazaard in the workplace.

They can do a ceremony without any of those things.

Have searched and searched and cannot find one study proving nurses' caps were a major source of infection to the point of patient risk. Yeah not every nurse was up on her cap laundering routine and or the thing got shoved into drawers, on top of or in lockers when off duty but still.... A quarter meter or less of material affixed to one's head and that under much of a floor nurses' daily duties comes no where near enough to a patient's face/body is supposed to spread germs how? Do they leap off? Were nurses shaking their capped heads over patients?

Someone came out with this "caps spread germs" theory and everyone latched on; better to come out and just admit to not wishing to wear the thing than to keep running with this notion.

icuRNmaggie, BSN, RN

Specializes in MICU, SICU, CICU. Has 24 years experience.

The white coat ceremony is a milestone and rite of passage for medical students.

A physician told me he was not happy with a certain nurse wearing a full white coat not a jacket because

people might mistake her for a physician.

I think we ought to have black nurse ninja jackets with RN embroidered in red. Or red jackets if you believe in color psychology.

Edited by icuRNmaggie

blondy2061h, MSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology. Has 15 years experience.

DoGoodThenGo said:
Have searched and searched and cannot find one study proving nurses' caps were a major source of infection to the point of patient risk. Yeah not every nurse was up on her cap laundering routine and or the thing got shoved into drawers, on top of or in lockers when off duty but still.... A quarter meter or less of material affixed to one's head and that under much of a floor nurses' daily duties comes no where near enough to a patient's face/body is supposed to spread germs how? Do they leap off? Were nurses shaking their capped heads over patients?

Someone came out with this "caps spread germs" theory and everyone latched on; better to come out and just admit to not wishing to wear the thing than to keep running with this notion.

I'm guessing no studies have been done on caps as a germ vector because caps were out of vogue before doing studies on such things was common. I mean, it would be like having a study now that smoking in the hospital is a bad idea. It's not going to happen, because no one smokes in the hospital any more.

MurseJJ

Specializes in Neurosurgery, Neurology.

icuRNmaggie said:
The white coat ceremony is a milestone and rite of passage for medical students.

A physician told me he was not happy with a certain nurse wearing a full white coat not a jacket because

people might mistake her for a physician.

I think we ought to have black nurse ninja jackets with RN embroidered in red. Or red jackets if you believe in color psychology.

Haha that would be great. In my hospital, the people that wear long white coats include:

-physicians

-physical therapists

-NPs

-PAs

-respiratory

-one social worker I've seen

-one pharmacist

-dietitians

-nurse managers and supervisors (not all supers though)

-VNS

-the people that come up to get insurance information

We also have those things that go behind your badge and hang under it that have your role in large letters, such as "RN", "NP", "PA", "DOCTOR", "PHARMACIST", "PCA", "USA", "RT"

Guess since now it seems everyone and their mother wears scrubs some in the nursing profession feel the need to take things to the next level. *LOL*

Walking around NYC am amazed at just how common scrubs have become. Everyone from the kid who walks dogs/cleans cages at our local vet's office to the girls at the local waxing salon and everyone it seems in between wears the things.

Was walking near Lenox Hill Hospital the other day and saw this tall cool drink of water strutting down Lexington Avenue in a very nice blue scrub uniform. Thought he was one of the nurses because IIRC NS-LIJ uses that colour for their nursing staff, but upon closer inspection of the embroidery on his top saw "DDS".