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What's it like the first time you...

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Specializes in ER/Forensics/Disaster. Has 13 years experience.

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RN 4 U

Specializes in none yet.

To user (JOV) I think this is nursing forum for new and older nurses. Yes it is terrifying when you have never done it before and you are afraid of hurting someone. You keep things in perspective here. What is terrifying to others might not be terrifiying to you, but it is terrifying in the eyes of all of us new nurses.

To user (JOV) I think this is nursing forum for new and older nurses. Yes it is terrifying when you have never done it before and you are afraid of hurting someone. You keep things in perspective here. What is terrifying to others might not be terrifiying to you, but it is terrifying in the eyes of all of us new nurses.

Well you may choose to use the word Terrify if you like and you may even choose to work yourself up into being terrified about something like IVs and Foleys. I shared my opinion that "terrifying" ought to be reserved for other circumstances. Using that word is doing nothing more than scaring everyone silly. Have you ever seen panic spread from one end of the room to the other? That's exactly how it happens.

I would like to encourage the OP to be practical and focused, not terrified. But of course, it is up to each individual.

BTW I am a nursing student myself but no I am not terrified by doing procedures for the first time. So I think I have the right to post my perspective too LOL

WDWpixieRN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg <1; Epic Certified <1.

For me, inserting an NG tube is the hardest thing. The first one I ever did....the patient vomited the end up and out. So, the NG was up her nose and out her mouth. I then started vomiting too and had to have another nurse cut that one off and redo it. I have never forgotten that.

:lol2:

Sorry....I couldn't help laughing while reading this because apparently you are an RN already, so you're long past this incident...but it helps those of us who still haven't dealt with "delicate situations" like this to know what others have gone through and not feel like like total failures if we, too, lose our cookies after something like this!! :eek:

Thanks for sharing!!

flygirls2, BSN

Specializes in ER/Forensics/Disaster. Has 13 years experience.

Thank you everyone for your answers!! ;) It's good to know you all succeeded without any problems, hopefully I will too.

Terrifying?

No, terrifying is being told your 11 year old has leukemia. Terrifying is standing in front of an altar and choosing the man you will live with until the day you die. Terrifying is getting on a plane at O'Hare airport to fly to Nairobi, Kenya, where not a single soul on the entire continent knows you.

Let's keep things in perspective here.

Yes, let's do keep things in perspective! Let's also not blow them out of proportion.

And by the way, I HAVE been to Nairobi, Kenya where not a soul on the continent knew me. Except I flew out of Charlotte Douglas Intl Airport, but none the less, amusing comment--thanks:)

Terrifying is getting on a plane at O'Hare airport to fly to Nairobi, Kenya, where not a single soul on the entire continent knows you.

Let's keep things in perspective here.

That doesn't sound terrifying to me. But then your perspective is different then mine.

The only thing about doing new procedures that is terrifying to me is being dressed down and humiliated for a minor mistake by an instructor who just might be Satan.

flygirls2, BSN

Specializes in ER/Forensics/Disaster. Has 13 years experience.

Ok, well EDIT to my original use of the word 'terrified'--- to 'anxious/nervous'. I really didn't think anyone would get that literal on my wording.

That doesn't sound terrifying to me. But then your perspective is different then mine.

I guess it all depends how long you are going to be out in the bush and how many bullets you have...

:offtopic:

I guess it all depends how long you are going to be out in the bush and how many bullets you have...

RN 4 U

Specializes in none yet.

Well you may choose to use the word Terrify if you like and you may even choose to work yourself up into being terrified about something like IVs and Foleys. I shared my opinion that "terrifying" ought to be reserved for other circumstances. Using that word is doing nothing more than scaring everyone silly. Have you ever seen panic spread from one end of the room to the other? That's exactly how it happens.

I would like to encourage the OP to be practical and focused, not terrified. But of course, it is up to each individual.

BTW I am a nursing student myself but no I am not terrified by doing procedures for the first time. So I think I have the right to post my perspective too LOL

Yes, I agree that you do have the right to post your comments,that was my whole point, other also the right to post their comments also. If they see it as terrifying that is how they feel, not you. It is terrrifying to someone who has never started an iv, foley, whatever because there is always a chance something could go wrong, but with practice and confidence they will eventually overcome that terrifying feeling and this is totally normal feeling.

vamedic4, EMT-P

Specializes in Peds Cardiology, Peds Neuro, PICU, IV Jedi. Has 23 years experience.

Give injections, draw blood, IV's, foley catheters, etc??

What is the hardest to learn? Is it terrifying:uhoh21: ?? The only thing I KNOW I have to learn this semester is the foley catheter. Is that difficult? Does it just slide right in? LOL, I'm terrified I will torture my first patient!

For me the hardest was cathing the little girls...babies in my case for UAs and urine cultures. Talk about a little target!!

Blood and IVs take practice practice practice...that only comes with time, so don't worry about not being "great" right out of the box. No one is.

Injections? Not bad once you have your landmarks down and remember to aspirate THEN push.

Just remember to LUBE THE FOLEY really well. I had brain surgery about 4 years ago and was on IV narcs post op so I couldn't urinate. I had to be I/O cathed ...and I think the nurse used a garden hose...it HURT...but I sure felt better afterward.

You'll do fine. Believe in yourself.

And have a great night

vamedic4

Gotta laugh about the foley--had a really old nurse tell me the first time to just aim for the crease in the middle-its almost always right there. Doggone if she wasn't right. Biggest part about the foley is to keep the pt. relaxed. I use a variation of lamaze breathing. A little hypervention really relaxes the muscles. JUst have your pt breath slow and deep a few times, then slip her in. Works pretty well. Have to agree that IV's can be the hardest, but even that got easier with time. After all these years, some days I just can't get a line. So never feel like a failure, just get the next one.

you win.

S.T.A.C.E.Y, LPN

Specializes in Emergency. Has 2 years experience.

The only thing about doing new procedures that is terrifying to me is being dressed down and humiliated for a minor mistake by an instructor who just might be Satan.

Through my clinicals I've had the chance to do most of my skills a few times (but by no means am I perfect at them) and its really not something to get anxious/nervous or worried about. Ya, the first time I was excited and anxious (more 'cause I thought it was cool, than b/c I was scared). If anything, its the instructor that will take care of making you feel stressed. Getting yourself all worked up, with shaky hands will just make the whole process that much worse. I just keep telling myself in my head that 'hey, its no big deal, I can do this.' Ask your instructor to run it through with you in the supply room, if you are nervous, but whatever you do don't show that you are terrified. Your instructor will hover to make sure you are doing it right, the patient will be watching you with eagle eyes, and you'll start to get worried.

Best advice from my clinical instructor: "Fake it 'til you Make it".....at least with the confidence. Don't make something a big deal that you honestly know shouldn't be.

The frist time I gave i.m inj i was really scared, I thought i'd broken a nerve or something, i couldnt wait to go back the next day to check on the patient but it was easy. I've never inserted an i.v but i will soon. Where i'm training nurses are not allowed to insert male foley's and i really dont know why. I've inserted female foley's and it went easily the only time i had a problem was with a circumcised patient it was difficult locating the urethral. I've learnt that with much practice procedurly it becomes a part of you.

WDWpixieRN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg <1; Epic Certified <1.

Gotta laugh about the foley--had a really old nurse tell me the first time to just aim for the crease in the middle-its almost always right there. Doggone if she wasn't right. Biggest part about the foley is to keep the pt. relaxed. I use a variation of lamaze breathing. A little hypervention really relaxes the muscles. JUst have your pt breath slow and deep a few times, then slip her in. Works pretty well. Have to agree that IV's can be the hardest, but even that got easier with time. After all these years, some days I just can't get a line. So never feel like a failure, just get the next one.

My friend who's been an RN for many years told me the other day that when she was in nursing school, her instructor told her that for females, "If you don't get it in the right place the first time, leave that tube there. If you don't get it right the second time, leave THAT tube there. You WILL get it right the third time".

I found that to be hilarious!! And something to keep in mind!!

The first time I catheterized a patient was during an OR rotation with both the anesthesiologist and surgeon standing with arms crossed watching me. :idea: Needless to say I was a nervous wreck because that is the only skill I ever failed. BUT I didn't show it, never let em see ya sweat! Thanks goodness the lady was already under anesthesia!

As far as IV's I thought it was the hardest skill because there was so much to it, IVP, IVPB, calculations etc... Unfortunately I have yet to start an IV because I haven't had the opportunity to as of yet. I'm sure when that time comes I'll be plenty nervous though. :uhoh3:

AliRae

Specializes in PICU, surgical post-op. Has 4 years experience.

"If you don't get it in the right place the first time, leave that tube there. If you don't get it right the second time, leave THAT tube there. You WILL get it right the third time".

This, while true, doesn't always work quite as well as it seems like it should! I somehow got through nursing school and never put in a foley, so my first one was on the job as a new grad. I took a handful in, with just the above advice in mind. Cut to a while later, me dripping sweat, with about 4 foleys crammed in this poor girl's va-jay-jay. Thankfully, she wasn't so much with it to know what was going on. Not to scare you or anything ... my preceptor and I had a great laugh about it, and I've never had the same problem.

Pretty much anything is scary the first time. IV's are my personal bane. So I've let it be known that if anyone has a halfway decent vein on a kid, I'd like to try first. I work PICU, so most times we send the most experienced warrior in to hit that tiny-little-vein-somewhere-between-the-toes. But whenever possible, I get them to let me practice. Remember to breathe ... you getting light-headed doesn't help anything!

Best of luck in nursing school ... I was there such a short time ago and can sympathize with the "terror"

PS Merry Christmas all!

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