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What Does A Graduate Nurse Do?

First Year   (2,560 Views 35 Comments)

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Hello, I am about to graduate nursing school. I'm beginning transitions next week, and I applied for an GN/RN position on the same floor I'm doing my transitions. I don't plan on taking my NCLEX immediately, I plan on taking this job and working as a GN and then take my NCLEX most likely 2-3mos post-graduation. I will remain on the same unit, just from a GN to an RN. My school hasn't explained what a GN does. I'm wondering how different it is compared to being a nurse, and what level of independence there is. There is a pay cut of that and a newly licensed nurse so I'm assuming we have less autonomy. Thanks!

Edited by Future-NurseRedHeart
Grammatical error

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Luckyyou has 7 years experience and works as a RN, CCRN.

2 Likes; 15,714 Visitors; 446 Posts

Semi off topic: take your NCLEX ASAP after school. Don't wait 2-3 months unless you absolutely have to.

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missmollie has 4 years experience as a ADN, BSN and works as a RN.

26 Likes; 13,202 Visitors; 849 Posts

Graduate nurse is just a nurse who hasn't gotten her license. Generally speaking, the organization you're working for will give you a set amount of time to sit for your boards. You will have to have another nurse responsible for what you do.

Do not wait to take the NCLEX. You don't want to waste your employer's time by waiting and possibly not passing, not to mention you'll be a burden to the RN who lets you practice under her license. It's a quick way to earn a bad name.

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Davey Do has 35 years experience and works as a Behavioral Health RN.

1,904 Likes; 13 Followers; 71,931 Visitors; 5,785 Posts

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Here.I.Stand has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and works as a RN.

107 Likes; 1 Follower; 41,560 Visitors; 4,771 Posts

I started my first job as a GN, but I was on orientation with an RN. I was expected to have my license before orientation was completed though. I don't remember when exactly I took my exam, if it was just before starting my job or if I'd already started but took the NCLEX soon after. I just remember calling home while on break, and my husband saying I had an envelope from the BON. I couldn't stand the wait so asked him to look for me, he read my "Congratulations" and said my paper license was in there. When I came back I remember telling my preceptor "I passed!!"

My hospital's policy was if we failed, we got demoted to a CNA... which was generous. Many places withdraw the position -- they need a licensed nurse.

I have personally never seen an unlicensed nurse working independently.

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Sour Lemon has 9 years experience.

739 Likes; 2 Followers; 28,858 Visitors; 4,076 Posts

In my home state, Texas, a graduate nurse could work independently for up to six months or up until they failed NCLEX- whichever came first. This probably varies greatly by state.

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Tenebrae has 6 years experience and works as a Registered Nurse in Gerontology.

150 Likes; 10,342 Visitors; 1,379 Posts

Why would you want to wait?

I'm imagining that the pay for a graduate nurse is pretty poor, not to mention having to run everything you do past another colleague

Sit the exam and get onto the business of being a nurse

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Sour Lemon has 9 years experience.

739 Likes; 2 Followers; 28,858 Visitors; 4,076 Posts

Why would you want to wait?

I'm imagining that the pay for a graduate nurse is pretty poor, not to mention having to run everything you do past another colleague

Sit the exam and get onto the business of being a nurse

When I graduated 8ish years ago, the pay for a new RN or a new GN was equal. Some people start working first just to pay for the exam.

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41 Likes; 10,235 Visitors; 1,372 Posts

Eh... I waited 2 months to take the NCLEX. That was pretty average for my class. My school did not teach to the test so everyone had to do additional studying to be prepared. So waiting few months may be appropriate depending on the OPs nursing program.

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Tenebrae has 6 years experience and works as a Registered Nurse in Gerontology.

150 Likes; 10,342 Visitors; 1,379 Posts

Thats cool

We dont have the option here. We cant work as an RN until we sit and pass our state final exam

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Tenebrae has 6 years experience and works as a Registered Nurse in Gerontology.

150 Likes; 10,342 Visitors; 1,379 Posts

Eh... I waited 2 months to take the NCLEX. That was pretty average for my class. My school did not teach to the test so everyone had to do additional studying to be prepared. So waiting few months may be appropriate depending on the OPs nursing program.

I find that really odd that your school wouldnt teach you to the test.

Everything we did in college was about preparing us to take the final exam and start working as a registered novice nurse

The pass rates for the state final exam are routinely between 95-100% of all graduates

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567 Visitors; 65 Posts

Sorry but this doesn't sound like a good idea. You don't want to have the stress of both being on orientation and having to study for the NCLEX. Take the NCLEX as soon as you can while the information is still fresh in your memory and you still have good study habits. That way, you have one less stressor to worry about.

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