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What determines school nurse salary?

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by amberfnp amberfnp (Member) Member

amberfnp has 10 years experience and specializes in Plastic Surgery, ER.

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mustlovepoodles is a RN and specializes in OB/GYN, Peds, School Nurse, DD.

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Wow! I need to move to where you guys are! Here in GA school nurses are paid about the same as the school attendance officer. That's right: about $25,000. That's for a nurse with many years of experience in the field, first year in a school. Is is any wonder that nurses come and go? There is a merit increase built in about every 12 months, but it's not much. There is NO negotiating salary--take it or leave it. The benefits are good though, same as the teachers. BUt it really rips my shorts that I have just as much education and more experience than most of hte teachers in my school and I get paid half (or I should say, i DID get paid half--I quit in June and it actually hasn't made that much impact on my household income. I may never go back!)

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LACA has 4 years experience as a BSN, LPN, RN and specializes in Med Office, Home Health, School Nurse.

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Wow! I'm obviously in the wrong state! Here in East TN, I've been a school nurse for 3 months, and I've had 4 years of experience in other fields of nursing. Because this year is only a 10 month year for me (since I started at the end of Sept), I'm only making $18,000 this year. Next year will be the full $20,000. I will also get a check in the summer months, so my checks during the year are somewhat smaller.

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how does $14/ hr sound? Not getting paid for snow days, spring and fall break and summer break isn't a benefit...unless you're rolling in dough from another source.

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"I will also get a check in the summer months, so my checks during the year are somewhat smaller."

Otherwise known as a interest free loan to the school district.

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LACA has 4 years experience as a BSN, LPN, RN and specializes in Med Office, Home Health, School Nurse.

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"I will also get a check in the summer months, so my checks during the year are somewhat smaller."

Otherwise known as a interest free loan to the school district.

What do you mean?

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We're the same mustluvdogs. I have to say it's a bit underwhelming. I started at 25000 4 years ago. I had my bachelor's degree in nursing and 4 years of nursing experience before starting school nursing. I am not on teacher's salary and do not get much of a raise each year. I love the work and I do have a wonderful schedule. But like others have mentioned, it would be nice to be compensated for my years of schooling and experience. Unfortunately it's up to school districts in Illinois to determine what salaries they want to offer non-teaching staff. I wish there was some way to have our salaries the way teachers have theirs set up.

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Originally Posted by bergren

"I will also get a check in the summer months, so my checks during the year are somewhat smaller."

 

Otherwise known as a interest free loan to the school district.

What do you mean?

It means that a portion of your salary that you earn in September - May (or June) is held back by the school and paid to you in the summer months. They keep the money you earned, use and invest it, paying no interest to you for holding your money, and pay you back months later.

A better model for the wage earner is that you get paid your full salary during the months you are working, and then you get to invest it and you earn interest on it before you need to spend for expenses over the summer months.

Think of all those bills you are paying interest on now that you could pay off if you were given all of your salary the month you earned it? Why are they allowed to do that? Some places it is optional, the employee elects to take a paycheck over 9 or 12 months. In that circumstance, you are deciding to give your money to them interest free. However, in many states it is not an option, you MUST take your salary over 12 months.

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LACA has 4 years experience as a BSN, LPN, RN and specializes in Med Office, Home Health, School Nurse.

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It just made more sense to me to shorten my checks during the school year and get a check during the summer,so that I don't have to worry about not having income during the summer. It was completely optional for us, however a lot of the employees in our system elect to do the 12 month option. As long as I get my paycheck when I'm supposed to, all is well.

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Purple_Scrubs has 8 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in School Nursing.

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I never thought about that, Martha. My district pays on 12 months, no option for 9 or 12. I never minded it because it is nice to get a check on the months we aren't working, but now that you say that, it kinda irks me!

I did do the math for my annual salary to see what it breaks down to on an hourly basis, and it a little over $30 per hour. Not too bad for my area. (We are on teacher scale as well)

I just found out that the pay increase for having a master's versus a bachelor's is only $1,000 PER YEAR! I was shocked that it was so low. For a doctorate it is between $3-$5k more per year, depending on your years of service. Based on that I am thinking of a BSN to PhD program instead of the master's programs I have been looking at. I hate to think of spending all that money for a master's then only getting a grand per year extra. I'd rather put a few extra years in and go ahead with the terminal degree.

Edited by Purple_Scrubs
clarification

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You go girl!!! We need more DNPs and PhDs in school nursing. There are a lot of online programs - see the NASN website: http://www.nasn.org/Default.aspx?tabid=607

The ones listed are all DNP - can people post PhD online programs they know about? Thanks

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Question - Anyone know if a diploma RN can get a job as a school nurse in PA?

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