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What to do by constantly asked to cover other shifts?

Nurses   (22,034 Views | 33 Replies)

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you've just got to tell them NO. they keep calling you because you keep saying yes. just tell them NO, tired/sick (of working all the time).

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3 Posts; 513 Profile Views

this happened to me all the time when i worked at a skilled nursing home for 4 yrs i would work 3-11 get home just get in bed and ring it would be the home asking if i would come in at 6am im like no way and it happened all the time, the phone calls would continue all nite if i didnt answer and having a family i could not let that happen. they would wake the whole house , then if u told them no they would ask why! as if that wasnt bad enough i would work 3-11 then have to go right back in at 630 inthe morning! they were short staffed and they would not hire anyone, i think that if they made the bosses work the shifts that needed covering they would of hired some nurses. . im so glad i do not work there anymore! :yeah:

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4 Followers; 11,299 Posts; 76,856 Profile Views

I don't have a phone in my bedroom unless I'm on call - then I use my cell phone. I'm not going to let anyone wake me up from a well-deserved sleep.

Otherwise - I screen using Caller ID and don't answer if it is my employer.

They can leave a message and I can listen to it - then decide if I want to say yes. I have time to think about it without the strong-arming or whining or whatever that goes on if you just answer without time to think.

edited to add - Esme . . . I like your style!

steph

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joanna73 is a BSN, RN and specializes in geriatrics.

1 Article; 4,767 Posts; 43,723 Profile Views

Get call display and/ or just say no. I don't feel bad at all when I hear facilities are short. There are thousands of unemployed nurses. They do it to themselves by wanting to be cheap. Not your problem.

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

11 Followers; 66 Articles; 13,948 Posts; 172,383 Profile Views

the nursing home where i work calls me at least 2-3 times a week and asks me to take on more hours. i am at the point that i am afraid to answer my phone. i have helped out, but enough is enough! i only want to work my schedule! i don't want to look bad, but at some point it is their problem that we don't have enough staff. anyone else in the same boat?

just say no!

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nursej22 has 30 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in med/surg,CV.

1 Follower; 1,353 Posts; 34,511 Profile Views

Just this week I have been asked to work a double, come in early, and work on my day off. So yes, I get called or asked while at work all the time, minimum 3-4 times a week. I will rarely pick up some hours but mostly my free time is all planned out.

I agree, this so-called team player business is an excuse not to have enough staff.

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linearthinker has 25 years experience as a DNP, RN and specializes in FNP.

1,688 Posts; 12,250 Profile Views

"I'm sorry, but I can't come in today: I have other committments."

Repeat PRN.

After that first call, do not answer their calls for the rest of the day: IMO, you told them No for today so you're under no obligation to keep answering the phone. And they can always leave a message if it's something else they're calling about besides extra hours.

ITA, except I leave out the apology. "No, I can't. Have a good day, bye." I do answer the home phone and nip it in the bud. A firm NO saves us all a lot of hassle. And that said, I would never under any circumstances give my employer my cell phone number. I have been asked for it and I tell them, "You have my home number, you may have my cell number when you start paying for it."

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1,735 Posts; 19,749 Profile Views

I hate dealing with this also. At my job we are asked to stay after our shifts all the time. Even 12 hour shifts. People are mandated to stay frequently due to call outs and issues scheduling. IF you refuse to stay for "a few more hours" ( 16-17hours in amed surg floor....) you will get tons of dirty looks from management and other nurses because you are " not a team player" or "not helping" the team. I don't care let the heros and martyrs deal with it.

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joanna73 is a BSN, RN and specializes in geriatrics.

1 Article; 4,767 Posts; 43,723 Profile Views

The working extra hours constantly, and being told I wasn't a team player is the whole reason I switched to nursing. I was in hotel mgmt for many years, which required the extra hours. Eventually, I was exhausted. I went home one day, put my suits in the garbage, and didn't return. Needless to say, I learned. Regardless of the excuses mgmt wants to give, there is only so much a person can work effectively. Now, as a nurse, I say...never again. I refuse to repeat those old patterns.

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MouseMichelle has 16 years experience and specializes in Home Health/Hospice.

192 Posts; 2,526 Profile Views

This is what I do on my days off, shut my ringer off and turn off my answering machine. If my boss texts me I ignore it and claim I didn't get it (I have a trac fone so my excuse is "oh I didn't have minutes I couldn't read it). Once you say yes then they think you're a sucker and will come in all the time. Next time say no you have plans, the time after that don't answer your phone.

Michelle

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