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Unhappy camper looking for some advice from nurses

Pre-Nursing   (7,281 Views 37 Comments)
by skigirl8 skigirl8 (New Member) New Member

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You are reading page 2 of Unhappy camper looking for some advice from nurses. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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Honestly, in the beginning, it's something new and different everyday, but after a while, it's same old same old. For NPs as well. Wow, an old person with diabetes and hypertension. Wow, another old person with diabetes and hypertension. OMG!!! An old person with diabetes but not hypertension! It's new and different!!

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TriciaJ has 37 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Psych, Corrections, Med-Surg, Ambulatory.

3,237 Posts; 33,580 Profile Views

Six figures? Working out on your lunch break? Most of us are drooling with envy because we don't even get lunch breaks. And certainly have no energy to work out. The heavy physical aspect of nursing is just exhausting, without any benefit to your heart, lungs or muscles. We eat junk food on the fly. That's why we're fat, flabby, tired and coping with chronic injuries. And told we're supposed to set an example.

Is there any way you can cut your hours at work and spend the time doing something worthwhile and exciting? I'd be looking at all sorts of creative options before I gave up lunch and regular workouts forever. Of course, I didn't really choose nursing, it chose me. So for all the crap I've endured, I haven't regretted a minute. You might be in the same boat, so good luck to you.

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Esme12 is a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma.

4 Articles; 20,896 Posts; 146,323 Profile Views

Currently I am a geologist, and I work in a big fancy office for a big oil company. I sit in front of a computer Mon-Fri 8-5. I go for coffee breaks, and workout at lunch. It is pretty easy. I get stressed when there are deadlines or presentations, but other than that it is pretty stress-free. I am close to making 6 figures in my 3rd year out of university. Sounds pretty awesome right??

But I am totally miserable. I have no passion for it. It bores me to tears. The thought of working here for the rest of my life makes me want to jump off the 30th floor. Geology is different in that there are no right answers and you are making stuff up and then presenting it as if it were the absolute truth. I really don't like that.

Sorry for the lengthy post, but I have been racking my brain for the past 2 years on what I might like to do instead. Discovering nursing has been like a light going on in my brain, but I am still unsure if (what I think are) my needs and the nursing profession will be a right fit. Here they are:

I want to be doing something different and exciting everyday, no sitting around and surfing the internet out of boredom.

I am an extrovert and am energized by my relationships with others.

I think it is totally awful that I am sitting 8-9 hours per day, sitting in the car, sitting on the couch at home.. even though I work out regularly I don't think humans are meant for this much sitting.

I want a career where I am doing something meaningful (ie. NOT finding oil in the ground)

I want to use my brain... I am a science geek.

I always want people to be comfortable and happy, and if I had a career doing that I think that would be amazing.

I have always been interested in healthcare, I initially wanted to be a doctor but my dreams of getting into medical school are long gone now. I've looked into phyisotherapy and occupational therapy as well.

I want the opportunity to work anywhere.

Monotony freaks me out.

What I am hoping to get with this post is some honest feedback from those who are nurses.

It is greatly appreciated :)

While nursing seems like a great idea....are you prepared to not have a job after graduation?

Are you prepared to work harder that you ever have before and make below $60,000.00?

Work holiday's and weekends?

Work shifts around the clock?

Seldom get an opportunity to urinate let alone get a break or lunch/dinner?

re you prepared to be responsible for everything, blamed for everything and have very little control? Are you prepared to be treated s if your existence doesn't matter and are replaceable/expendable at the slightest whim?

Are you prepared to be yelled at, screamed at, and be treated with disrespect by the general public because you refused to give them anything to eat even though they are not allowed anything by mouth?

Are you prepared to be low man on the totem poll with little to no control over you environment yet be responsible for people lives?

There is no nursing shortage....the average nursing job search is 18 months with many hospitals not hiring new graduates and requiring a BSN degree. Many areas in the US have a plethora of nursing grads......Nurses Schools, Salaries, and Job Data all seeking that yellow brick road.

Consider very carefully about leaving your position with benefits....many hospitals are only hiring part time/per-diem/as needed workers to avoid benefits.

Don't get me wrong...I love being a nurse...but I had no thoughts of the "pot o gold" now promised by the media. It's hard grueling work with only a few moments thrown in now and then to remind you why you wanted it in the first place.

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4 Articles; 176 Posts; 16,181 Profile Views

OP, repeat after me: DO. Not.Leave.That.Job!

The grass always seem greener on the other side. Your job is great! What you need is variety, you need something that would add a spark. From what you have written, it seems that you should have some leeway.

Go to conference

-hang with positive and energized folks

-Remember and keep the original reason you went into geology

-Do something fun and not your normal routine

-Get a hobby that challenges you.

-Shake up that routine for a bit

Do not let your feelings cause you to make a hasty decision; our feelings change frequently. I hesitate to tell you to remain in a job that you say right now is not for you, but you will rue it more if you made a hasty decision based on only emotions.

If you finally do decide that nursing is where you want to be, go into it with no unreal expectations & you will find that peace or at least a stability of mind.

Edited by The_Optimist

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Find a CNA training program in your current city. This is an approximately 78 - 92 hour, 6-week (-ish) course, depending on your state's requirements. Many training programs can allow you to complete this training over a longer period as long as you talk with their staff at the outset about your schedule limitations. The skills training is mostly 'in-person', though some learning can be done from a book or online. At the end of your training and clinical rotation, you will have experienced the day-to-day responsibilities of appropriately interacting with patients dependent on your care. Clinicals usually take place in long-term care facilities: older populations, chronic conditions, dementia. Patients will run the spectrum from grateful to nasty, harassing to zombified.

You will understand how to safely move yourself and your patients. You will be taught, and you will learn how to feed someone else, how to make their bed while they are still in it, how to bathe them in bed or in a shower chair, how to brush their hair, their teeth and some nail care. All of these tasks will be done with appropriate techniques to avoid cross-contamination with microorganisms. Body fluids galore!

If, at the end of this exercise, you feel like you could work in these conditions, as an RN, directing your CNA support staff, using your critical thinking and problem solving skills to the benefit of your patients, then "yes", you might be happy working as a nurse with the goal to become a Nurse Practitioner. Keep in mind that you will have to complete your BSN training, gain your RN license and then go on through a Master's program or a BSN to PHD program in order to become an NP. In every event, however, you will encounter and be responsible for managing care for others who are experiencing the full range of human joy and defeat, loss and triumph, anger, betrayal, hopelessness and apathy. You will be responsible for recording their progress and guiding them toward healthy outcomes regardless of your personal feelings towards them. You and your team must support the patient with every task, and hopefully you and your team can also support each other.

There are career options for nurses outside of direct patient care at the bedside, but you will, at the very least, pass through this kind of workplace on your way to your advanced-degree work situation. Many of these other options break down into the roles of teacher, researcher, manager, advocate. If, in the end, you might be happy in a career performing these roles, then the real question is: If money is no object, then will I be more fulfilled by using my talents and knowledge to advance the science behind nursing, or behind medicine, or behind geology?

The truism (not really always the truth) among nurses is "Nurses treat people. Doctors treat diseases." You say you are an extrovert. That doesn't tell anyone if you can put the immediate needs of someone else above your own needs, automatically, every working hour. And do that gracefully and with honest compassion, and with little overt thanks given to you in return? Could you be happy if that was your legal and ethical requirement for a successful career?

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OCNRN63 is a RN and specializes in Oncology; medical specialty website.

5,978 Posts; 53,758 Profile Views

I just want to add, I am quite sure I would go on to become a nurse practitioner if I choose nursing. Would have liked to get into med school but my grades aren't up to snuff. And I am a female btw.

I like the idea of a paramedic.. I don't think the pay is as good as nursing though. I will check it out.

Is a PA a physician's assistant?

This is really ringing true for me..

PA is a physician's assistant. I think you'd get more of the science that you enjoy if you go that route, and you'd get there faster than if you went the NP route.

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Esme12 is a ASN, BSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care, ED, Cath lab, CTPAC,Trauma.

4 Articles; 20,896 Posts; 146,323 Profile Views

I just want to add, I am quite sure I would go on to become a nurse practitioner if I choose nursing. Would have liked to get into med school but my grades aren't up to snuff. And I am a female btw.

I like the idea of a paramedic.. I don't think the pay is as good as nursing though. I will check it out.

Is a PA a physician's assistant?

This is really ringing true for me..

You do realize nursing has become very competative and requires that grades be "up to snuff"

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15 Posts; 1,092 Profile Views

I really appreciate everyone's responses and it has given me plenty of food for thought.

In terms of grades.. I have an honours degree with a GPa of 3.6/4. Where I live (Canada) to get into med school you need above a 3.8. There are 1800 applicants at my local university and they take 120.

I have searched more about OT's and PA, but I still like the idea of becoming a nurse and eventually a NP. I am absolutely crazy for mountain biking and skiing and would love to live in a mountain town. Becoming a nurse would allow me to live in these places and make good money. I am not sure there would be as many positions for OT's and PA's there. BUT I am not basing my decision to become a nurse purely on the fact I can live in a small mountain town.. it is just one of the benefits.

Again, thanks everyone.

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161 Posts; 4,825 Profile Views

The money is not that good. Most people live beyond their means no matter how much money they make. Nursing is not a guaranteed job anywhere you want to live. Nursing school was challenging, but the day to day tasks that we are ordered to do makes me feel like a robot with not as much autonomy as I thought I would have. If you want to interact with people, volunteer, pick up some hobbies. I am planning on going to PA school so that I may have an opportunity to be respected more, think more critically and independently and really problem solve for my pts, not just follow orders all day.

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1,871 Posts; 22,683 Profile Views

I really appreciate everyone's responses and it has given me plenty of food for thought.

In terms of grades.. I have an honours degree with a GPa of 3.6/4. Where I live (Canada) to get into med school you need above a 3.8. There are 1800 applicants at my local university and they take 120.

I have searched more about OT's and PA, but I still like the idea of becoming a nurse and eventually a NP. I am absolutely crazy for mountain biking and skiing and would love to live in a mountain town. Becoming a nurse would allow me to live in these places and make good money. I am not sure there would be as many positions for OT's and PA's there. BUT I am not basing my decision to become a nurse purely on the fact I can live in a small mountain town.. it is just one of the benefits.

Again, thanks everyone.

1800 for 120 slots, that isn't even bad compared to the US. You can have 3-5k apply for 100 slots

Go NP, bedside nursing isn't what you think even though nursing leaders (who haven't seen a patient in 20 years) glorify this Florence Nightingale "calling" BS.

My Dad was a geologist and made bank, I wish I would have done that sometimes....

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NurseGirl525 is a ASN, RN and specializes in ICU.

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Ok, I am going to offer a differing opinion here. While much of what is being said is true, you have to be happy in life. Sure, I could have gone back to a retail position making quite a bit of money and while it would be great for a few months doing something in business that I am good at, I was miserable at that job. I was so happy when I quit 8 years ago to become a SAHM when I was pregnant with my son. Now that he is in school and I am getting divorced it was time for me to think about what I wanted to be when I grew up. I am a science fanatic so just the schooling is so much fun for me. I have been researching medical stuff since I was a kid. I can remember being at my grandmother's house and reading her medical for fun at the age of 8. Yes, nursing is hard work and puts stress on your body and you deal with a ton of ungrateful people and also deal with rude doctors, but seriously what job doesn't have rude coworkers or people. You deal with that no matter what your profession is. And while tons of people on here say there is no nursing shortage it depends on where you live. Go to the right area and there are plenty of jobs. I would just make absolutely sure this is what you want to before you leave your job.

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Yuppers21 has 4 years experience and specializes in Med/Surg, ICU.

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First, keep in mind that just about any professional forum you go to is going to dose out a large amount of negativity for their chosen career, so dont take all the responses too much to heart. There is a lot to dislike in this profession, but it is not all toil and misery. The thing I like most about nursing is the variety it offers. Many a nurse has found that s/he simply needed to find the right specialty, rather than a whole new career. I did not enjoy my time on med-surg; the only thing that kept me coming back was my coworkers and the knowledge that it was a stepping stone to where I really wanted to be. I am much happier in ICU for a variety of reasons, while at the same time am still affected by the BS that always seems to accompny bedside care (pun intended!). Yet still, I may decide to move on to something else within nursing and I find that very exciting. Endless specialties, community nursing, management, adminstration, advanced practice, research, teaching, IT, legal, entrepreneurship, sales - the list goes on and on. Not many other careers offer this kind of variety. Bored with your current position? Take the leap into something totally different while remaining under the vast umbrella that is nursing.

With all that said, I still think you have a sweet gig. I'm pretty sure I would trade places with you in a heartbeat :p

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