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Type B in a Type A world

Nurses   (12,936 Views | 64 Replies)

ThePrincessBride has 5 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Med-Surg, NICU.

1 Article; 56,388 Profile Views; 2,325 Posts

Bg: started new job a couple months ago. Love my job but my problem?

I have been dealing with a couple of super type A ICU nurses. You know the type. The ones who seem to be super nurses. Always think their **** doesn't stink and think their way is the only way.

This wouldn't be an issue if I wasn't being precepted by a few of them and know they throw each other under the bus. The night shift preceptor I have is amazing but the day shift ones I have seem to enjoy picking me apart. They are always riding me and breathing down my neck.

I am type b. I learn by doing and not having some watch me like a hawk and criticizing every...single...thing that I do while I am doing it.

How do I deal with these people? I am almost done with orientation. My night shift preceptor is great and I only have a couple more weeks until I am on my own. But I know that I will be having to deal with those type A nurses and giving report to them.

Hoe does a type b introvert who is more about the big picture and less about the details survive in a type A icu nursing world that is always caught up in detail?

I am afraid to be ripped to shreds out of orientation for not being "perfect."

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17 Posts; 2,050 Profile Views

I'm not sure... But isn't the ICU all about attention to details? Sorry that they're giving you a hard time though.

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Hoosier_RN has 20 years experience as a MSN and specializes in LTC, home health, hospice, ICU, ER, dialysis.

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ICU is all about the details, while keeping an eye on the big picture. Keep the big picture in mind, but really listen to your receptors. Ask the catty ones directly how to correct your deficiencies (as they see them). Unfortunately, they can label you as difficult to work with, and have you right out of there. I remember that you were so excited to get that job. Use your enthusiasm to learn. Good luck!

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happy_life has 8 years experience.

36 Posts; 1,509 Profile Views

I've been a nurse for almost 9 years and have had to go through orientation with a preceptor several times (new grad, transition from Med surg to ICU, open heart training, job transitions from one hospital to another). It always sucks because you can't do your own thing but I have a couple of tips for you:

1. Just try to get through it, do things how the preceptor does it, and just try to have an open mind. Even with years of experience, I still learn new things from my preceptors and I appreciate that because it makes my job easier. Soon enough you'll be able to be on your own and you can do things your way ;)

2. If your preceptor and other nurses are giving you a hard time, try to ask them what you can do better and have them show you. Show them appreciation for taking the time to teach you. Again you don't have to take their advice, but just showing them that you are willing to learn goes a long way towards a better relationship with the crusty old bats!

3. Always offer to help! Especially when you're new on a unit. Put off your charting til after all the call lights are answered and you've made sure your coworkers don't need anything. That always helps!!!

Hope this helps you with your situation! :)

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Here.I.Stand has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in SICU, trauma, neuro.

1 Follower; 4,976 Posts; 42,868 Profile Views

ICU is all about the details, while keeping an eye on the big picture. Keep the big picture in mind, but really listen to your receptors. Ask the catty ones directly how to correct your deficiencies (as they see them). Unfortunately, they can label you as difficult to work with, and have you right out of there. I remember that you were so excited to get that job. Use your enthusiasm to learn. Good luck!

This was my first thought--that in the ICU you really do have to look at both details and big picture. Hopefully they are giving you suggestions how to do this, and if they are I would humbly take that direction. I'm sure you're a good nurse, but they are experienced in the NICU and at this point, you're not. If they are just criticizing without a constructive aspect, like RNinIN suggested, ask.

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ThePrincessBride has 5 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Med-Surg, NICU.

1 Article; 2,325 Posts; 56,388 Profile Views

Thanks everyone.

I am still excited about the job. I am just so ready to be off of orientation and on my own. I have been getting some good feedback but I feel nitpick. On night shift it was different.

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Sun0408 has 4 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Trauma Surgical ICU.

1,761 Posts; 36,096 Profile Views

The ICU is all about the details as well as the big picture. I'm not sure if you are a new grad or just new to the ICU but as a preceptor it is my job to watch you do things and to make sure they are done correctly. Once you have shown competence in one area I am more likely to back off some as you do that skill or task again. However when a new skill or task comes up, I will be there. I think your preceptors are similar. It's their job. As for orientation, it sucks no matter how much experience you have. Changing jobs or departments will result in some form of orientation. Just go with the flow, ask specific questions if an issues arises. The more you are aware, the better chance you have of correcting it. Best of luck to you[emoji5]️

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ThePrincessBride has 5 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Med-Surg, NICU.

1 Article; 2,325 Posts; 56,388 Profile Views

I still am enthusiastic. I love the work. I take constructive criticism well. I just feel like some of the nurses just look to nitpick at certain things that in the grand scheme are so small. Like changing a diaper. Type A: it HAS to be a certain way. Type B: does it fit? Is the butt covered? Okay.

Or demanding to shove respiratory out the way to get work done and having to take longer to get certain cares done because I don't want to interrupt another professional's care on an unstable baby.

I don't know. I do value everything I am being taught. I gel well with night shift that seem to attract more type b people.

ICU is all about the details, while keeping an eye on the big picture. Keep the big picture in mind, but really listen to your receptors. Ask the catty ones directly how to correct your deficiencies (as they see them). Unfortunately, they can label you as difficult to work with, and have you right out of there. I remember that you were so excited to get that job. Use your enthusiasm to learn. Good luck!

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ThePrincessBride has 5 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Med-Surg, NICU.

1 Article; 2,325 Posts; 56,388 Profile Views

The ICU is all about the details as well as the big picture. I'm not sure if you are a new grad or just new to the ICU but as a preceptor it is my job to watch you do things and to make sure they are done correctly. Once you have shown competence in one area I am more likely to back off some as you do that skill or task again. However when a new skill or task comes up, I will be there. I think your preceptors are similar. It's their job. As for orientation, it sucks no matter how much experience you have. Changing jobs or departments will result in some form of orientation. Just go with the flow, ask specific questions if an issues arises. The more you are aware, the better chance you have of correcting it. Best of luck to you[emoji5]️

I have med-surg experience which is nothing like nicu. So yeah you may as well call me a new grad, lol.

Thanks for all the feedback everyone! I just have to survive a couple more weeks.

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5 Posts; 319 Profile Views

I'm a type B all the way. I worked in the ICU for 2 years. For me night shift was a better fit for us type B's. Not sure why exactly, but I was much more comfortable. Yes ICU is very much about the details, I'm more of the big picture thinker do it was a challenge to me.

For instance, I could go to help another RN, walk into the room and see the big picture immediately and from that deduce what the problem was....the detail that she was good at but I saw the bigger picture. I hope that makes sense?

I did really well on codes or rapid response because I could walk in and see the big picture and jump right in.

I think the ICU needs both type A and type B personalities. We both bring our own special skills. I had to learn from others to slow down and look at the details, that was a learning process for me. In return I was able to teach how I saw the big picture.

Unfortunately though in real life. Type A and B personalities can really clash and some ppl just are not going to try learn from each other. I think in ICU environments it's more apparent than in other specialties. That's just my observation though.

I left after a couple years and am now in a nursing speciality that works better for me. You sound like your doing a great job. And ICU experience, whether 6 months or 6 years, is a great backbone to have.

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HouTx has 35 years experience as a BSN, MSN, EdD and specializes in Critical Care, Education.

9,051 Posts; 45,275 Profile Views

OK - I'm not getting the "type A / type B" alignment here. Friedman & Rosenmann's 1950 study (where these terms originated) identified a distinct (Type A) personality that are highly competitive, hard working high-achievers, very driven to accomplish and exceed expectations... versus the laid back (type B) tolerant, reflective, even-tempered other end of the spectrum. A's tended to strive for perfection while B's are less stressed overall and were more resilient and philosophical when faced with failure. No evidence that A's were less empathetic or socially aware than their B counterparts.

Specialty, high-intensity clinical areas tend to attract 'type A' nurses who are always looking for new challenges - but I think that the harpy shrews described by OP are just nasty people who are determined to make themselves feel better by tearing down someone else. Please don't sully a perfectly good psychological theory - LOL.

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wolf9653 has 20 years experience and specializes in Psych,LTC,.

208 Posts; 2,163 Profile Views

Suck up to them, let them think you think they are god, compliment them like crazy, feed their egos, . maybe they will even watch your back for you. and learn all you can from them. play their short game while you play the long game.

Bg: started new job a couple months ago. Love my job but my problem?

I have been dealing with a couple of super type A ICU nurses. You know the type. The ones who seem to be super nurses. Always think their **** doesn't stink and think their way is the only way.

This wouldn't be an issue if I wasn't being precepted by a few of them and know they throw each other under the bus. The night shift preceptor I have is amazing but the day shift ones I have seem to enjoy picking me apart. They are always riding me and breathing down my neck.

I am type b. I learn by doing and not having some watch me like a hawk and criticizing every...single...thing that I do while I am doing it.

How do I deal with these people? I am almost done with orientation. My night shift preceptor is great and I only have a couple more weeks until I am on my own. But I know that I will be having to deal with those type A nurses and giving report to them.

Hoe does a type b introvert who is more about the big picture and less about the details survive in a type A icu nursing world that is always caught up in detail?

I am afraid to be ripped to shreds out of orientation for not being "perfect."

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