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The Other Side of ObamaCare - Nurse's Health Benefits

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Few things are certain for nursing regarding the new healthcare laws, one thing not so clear however will be how hospitals and others such as registries will deal with changes in how they provide healthcare benefits to nurses and other staff.Much as many hate to consider them so, hospitals are businesses, either run for profit or not for profit, either way the landscape has changed. Several large Fortune 500 companies already have announced charges to their bottom line due to changes in accounting rules, and more are sure to follow. Retired persons with certain benefits that now can be had via Medicare seem to be at risk of having that coverage taken away via employers, but there are bound to be more changes.Obama and the Democrats seem to believe businesses will simply take any increase in costs on the chin, and consider society as a whole, but at least my experience tells me that wish may be a bit premature.Thoughts?

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I haven't had time to read the bill, but based on what I've heard, I agree with much of your analysis. It wouldn't be the first time they've passed something without thinking it through. To be frank, I'm getting angrier every time I research this ... And on a more basic level, why hasn't anyone addressed the questions about filling the jump in demand for healthcare workers? You might say they haven't thought that through, but I suspect they're not that ignorant. I just hope that by the time I graduate, I can still provide safe care for my patients.

Regards,

Mukfay

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chenoaspirit is a ASN, RN and specializes in Med/Surg, Home Health.

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I get angry too everytime I read about it. I dont like it....

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neicey59 has 32 years experience and specializes in all areas.

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when I worked at the hospital.

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Katie82 has 38 years experience as a RN and specializes in Med Surg, Tele, PH, CM.

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And on a more basic level, why hasn't anyone addressed the questions about filling the jump in demand for healthcare workers? You might say they haven't thought that through, but I suspect they're not that ignorant. I just hope that by the time I graduate, I can still provide safe care for my patients.

This entire Bill is a dangerous travesty that was poorly thought out and outrageously expensive. It was pushed on us by politicians who wanted to pass a bill (any bill) for political gain. As we educate ourselves to some of the finer points of this bill, it will surely backfire for these idiots. I agree with the need for Healthcare Reform, but this bill has more holes than Swiss Cheese. As hospitals face cuts in reimbursement, they will counter by hiring fewer nurses. My daughter graduated from nursing school in December, and is finally being offered a job because the hospital she is working at as a Unit Clerk has finally posted Fellowship jobs for new grads. Fellowships are another idea that is being pushed on hospitals, and while I understand the importance of a good orientation, I think 9-12 months is a bit of overkill. These Fellowships are expensive to the hospital, so they have incurred a lot of staffing vacancies because they cannot afford to hire new grads in this time of uncertain reimbursements.

My greatest worry is the supply of physicians. As the powers in Washington cut reimbursements to doctors, where are they going to find physicians willing to see Medicaid and Medicare patients, especially when they plan to "dump" the lowest income level of uninsured into state Medicaid rolls. I have trouble finding providers for my patients now. If you are getting ready to graduate from nursing school, line yourself up to work in the ER, because that's where the action- and the job security- will be within the next few years.

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Few things are certain for nursing regarding the new healthcare laws, one thing not so clear however will be how hospitals and others such as registries will deal with changes in how they provide healthcare benefits to nurses and other staff.Much as many hate to consider them so, hospitals are businesses, either run for profit or not for profit, either way the landscape has changed. Several large Fortune 500 companies already have announced charges to their bottom line due to changes in accounting rules, and more are sure to follow. Retired persons with certain benefits that now can be had via Medicare seem to be at risk of having that coverage taken away via employers, but there are bound to be more changes.Obama and the Democrats seem to believe businesses will simply take any increase in costs on the chin, and consider society as a whole, but at least my experience tells me that wish may be a bit premature.Thoughts?

This is just one of the many reasons I was v. unhappy with the final bill that was passed and signed into law. We would all have been much better off with a true single-payer system, or at least a "public option" in the final plan.

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Not_A_Hat_Person has 10 years experience as a RN and specializes in Geriatrics, Home Health.

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Retired persons with certain benefits that now can be had via Medicare seem to be at risk of having that coverage taken away via employers, but there are bound to be more changes.

That's already the case with Tricare, for retired military and their families. Once you hit 65, Tricare is available as a Medicare supplement, not as full insurance.

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281 Posts; 5,600 Profile Views

Few things are certain for nursing regarding the new healthcare laws, one thing not so clear however will be how hospitals and others such as registries will deal with changes in how they provide healthcare benefits to nurses and other staff.Much as many hate to consider them so, hospitals are businesses, either run for profit or not for profit, either way the landscape has changed. Several large Fortune 500 companies already have announced charges to their bottom line due to changes in accounting rules, and more are sure to follow. Retired persons with certain benefits that now can be had via Medicare seem to be at risk of having that coverage taken away via employers, but there are bound to be more changes.Obama and the Democrats seem to believe businesses will simply take any increase in costs on the chin, and consider society as a whole, but at least my experience tells me that wish may be a bit premature.Thoughts?

They're doing no such thing. I'm not sure what "Obamacare" is exactly but I am certain that people tossing the term around have no idea, or otherwise have their own agenda.

If you're referring to the ACA requirement that people carry coverage then that will reduce costs because the rest of us won't have to pay for their ED visits. Walmart might have to give insurance benefits to their employees instead of stickng the rest of us with the bill. that's a good thing.

With 30 years of healthcare inflation exceeding all other inflation HAS been to let the industry run amok and pass the costs on to consumers and their employers. THAT's what's been the status quo.

So what are you specifically objecting to?

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281 Posts; 5,600 Profile Views

And on a more basic level, why hasn't anyone addressed the questions about filling the jump in demand for healthcare workers? You might say they haven't thought that through, but I suspect they're not that ignorant. I just hope that by the time I graduate, I can still provide safe care for my patients.

This entire Bill is a dangerous travesty that was poorly thought out and outrageously expensive. It was pushed on us by politicians who wanted to pass a bill (any bill) for political gain. As we educate ourselves to some of the finer points of this bill, it will surely backfire for these idiots. I agree with the need for Healthcare Reform, but this bill has more holes than Swiss Cheese. As hospitals face cuts in reimbursement, they will counter by hiring fewer nurses. My daughter graduated from nursing school in December, and is finally being offered a job because the hospital she is working at as a Unit Clerk has finally posted Fellowship jobs for new grads. Fellowships are another idea that is being pushed on hospitals, and while I understand the importance of a good orientation, I think 9-12 months is a bit of overkill. These Fellowships are expensive to the hospital, so they have incurred a lot of staffing vacancies because they cannot afford to hire new grads in this time of uncertain reimbursements.

My greatest worry is the supply of physicians. As the powers in Washington cut reimbursements to doctors, where are they going to find physicians willing to see Medicaid and Medicare patients, especially when they plan to "dump" the lowest income level of uninsured into state Medicaid rolls. I have trouble finding providers for my patients now. If you are getting ready to graduate from nursing school, line yourself up to work in the ER, because that's where the action- and the job security- will be within the next few years.

Please do be specific. What in this "travesty" do you specifically object to? Please provide specifics, not rhetoric. How will it "impact the supply of physicians" . Please do note that the supply of General Practitioners has been leveling off for 15 years and has nothing to do with this.

As for nursing staffs being increased and pay being reduced (through patient loads, immigration, et al) that's been going on for over a decade. I'm not sure how expanded coverage reduces the demand for nurses.

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That's already the case with Tricare, for retired military and their families. Once you hit 65, Tricare is available as a Medicare supplement, not as full insurance.

Didn't they just recently change that to be if you're eligible for Medicare you go on medicare. The DoD has been very much struggling with healthcare inflation and rising costs tremendously.

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This is just one of the many reasons I was v. unhappy with the final bill that was passed and signed into law. We would all have been much better off with a true single-payer system, or at least a "public option" in the final plan.

Perhaps but politically it wasn't feasible. The president can't just do this by himself; he's gotta have congress. That's hard when people get their "news and information" from biased sources and their donors (insurance payors) are lobbying hard against them. We all know (hopefully) the efficiencies that come with a private payor system but you can't even suggest it without big monied interests riling up a truckload of rhetoric and having tens of thousands of ignoramuses screaming something about 'Socialism'.

The only way he could have possibly been successful was with broadscale demand from the public. most are too busy doing other things to even pay attention and the rest are split with half of the direct to be affected, and clearly with no clue of the facts, screaming something about socialism and hating the president and should impeach him. The rhetoric has reached a point where it is just impossible to have a sane, reasoned conversation on anything of significance and affecting the country. THAT is the "travesty" the other poster should have referred to.

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azhiker96 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in PACU.

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The current plan for vouchers is problematic. http://online.wsj.com/article/SB10001424052748704628404576265692304582936.html?KEYWORDS=DANIEL+P+KESSLER

Starting in 2014, subsidies will be available to families with incomes between 134% and 400% of the federal poverty line. (Families earning less than 134% of poverty are eligible for Medicaid.) For example, a family of four headed by a 55-year-old earning $31,389 in 2014 dollars (134% of the federal poverty line) in a high-cost area will get a subsidy of $22,740. This will cover 96% of an insurance policy that the Kaiser Family Foundation predicts will cost $23,700. A similar family earning $93,699 (400% of poverty) gets a subsidy of $14,799. But a family earning $1 more--$93,700--gets no subsidy.

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