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Terminated After Two Months!!

Nurse Beth Article   (32,463 Views 63 Comments 1,091 Words)
by Nurse Beth Nurse Beth, MSN (Advice Column) Writer Innovator Expert

Nurse Beth has 30 years experience as a MSN and works as a Nursing Professional Development Specialist.

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I graduated from a BSN school in June 2015, and since then, I've been through 2 jobs. My first job was at a big well-known hospital. I got hired into their new grad program but was placed on day shift on the busiest floor of the hospital (MS/Tele/Onc). Their training program was about 3 months, but I didn't think it was long enough for me. You are reading page 6 of Terminated After Two Months!!. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

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You can also try Dialysis. Every dialysis company I know has a training program. It is extensive and dictated to by CMS. It is spelled out in the regulations how long a nurse must be in training before they can be left on their own. You may find that this will appeal to you. You see the same groups of patients, all with co-morbidities that will introduce you to a lot of different things. Good luck to you.

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Having worked in multiple acute care areas,as well as mental health, home health, and insurance, I have some concerns. You should have some solid skills from nursing school, and I hope you made your mentor aware you were drowning in yourexternship. In my opinion, a new grad should never start in ICU, ED, L&D. These are frantic,high stress areas that require split second recognition of problems, and equally fast responses. Med-surg for a year or twowillhelpthetransition from 2 patients in school to 8-10 patients in the real world. Home health has th he same limitations. You are, frankly, not ready to Be out on your own, making decisions in a home setting with little or no backup. LTD would be much slower, and give you time to get your feet under you. Working part time in a small hospital might also. Be an option. Check with your state board to see if your state has some opportunities for extended internships, or other further training. Hang in there, take a deep breath, settle down. You can do this!

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As another new grad- I agree! My limited time in ICU during clinicals was amazing- I learned more than any other rotation. It's one to two patients (I'm in California), and you're able to laser focus on what you're doing. Your skill set grows, your muscle memory is solidified, there's enough other people around in close quarters to get help when you need it.

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