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Step up from CNA to LPN...help!

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I am looking to become an LPN but was wondering what is the best route to take. I heard that they have step up programs from CNA to LPN and they are shorter, instead of taking a regular LPN program.

Has anyone done a step up program? What should I do?

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience.

Where are you located?

Where I am located, there is no "step-up" programs; most PN programs are a little over a year full-time, though there are part-time programs as well.

PN programs have strict requirements to provide hours required per the BON; so I think there are no "short" programs going this route.

I am located in Glassboro, New Jersey. One of my coworkers was explaining to me that there are "step up" programs but I have never heard of them. I am trying to find a program!

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

There are "step-up" programs, also called "bridge programs," completion programs or transition programs, for LPNs looking to become RNs. However, CNA-to-LPN completion programs do not exist.

Many LPN programs will grant a small amount of credit for possessing a CNA certificate. Some programs also require possession of the CNA certificate as a prerequisite.

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience.

There are "step-up" programs, also called "bridge programs," completion programs or transition programs, for LPNs looking to become RNs. However, CNA-to-LPN completion programs do not exist.

Many LPN programs will grant a small amount of credit for possessing a CNA certificate. Some programs also require possession of the CNA certificate as a prerequisite.

This.

The best thing to do is find out from the schools that you are interested in...I'm in a neighboring state and they do not allow "credit" for being a CNA...plus the way the hours are created per BON guidelines, they possibly couldn't.

Best wishes.

My local community college has an LPN program, but the first 5 weeks are essentially the nursing assistant program. If you are already a CNA you don't have to enter until after the first 5 weeks.

At my school there is a cna-to-lpn and there is a cna-to-adn and I live in Charleston sc

In my state (CA) there is no step up program per se, but a person can challenge the NCLEX-PN with proof of certain qualifications that start with 52 months of paid work experience covering the types of nursing found in nursing school. Hard for the typical person to accomplish unless they were a corpsman in the armed services. Info can be found on the state website. I imagine you can find pertinent information on your state's nursing board website.

duskyjewel

Specializes in hospice.

Here in the Phoenix area there is a program at the Maricopa Skills Center that starts with CNA training and then takes you immediately into LPN training. So it would seem your assertion that these programs don't exist is false, Commuter. There seem to be at least a couple from this thread.

LoriRNCM, ADN, ASN, RN

Specializes in Hospice. Has 3 years experience.

I would also look up the salary for LPNs in your state. I looked up nursing salaries in my state and was shocked that LPNs were not paid a lot more than CNAs. You may want to consider RN. I was shocked to see that, personally. Obviously it varies by institution and this was an average.

duskyjewel

Specializes in hospice.

Always with the "you should consider RN." Duh. We know that. Most of us don't plan to stop at LPN.

When RN waiting lists are 2 and 3 years long, and you can't afford to take on lots of debt, you start looking at other options. Why do so many commenters assume people pursuing LPN are completely unaware and haven't examined their options thoroughly? :banghead:

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

Always with the "you should consider RN." Duh. We know that. Most of us don't plan to stop at LPN.

When RN waiting lists are 2 and 3 years long, and you can't afford to take on lots of debt, you start looking at other options. Why do so many commenters assume people pursuing LPN are completely unaware and haven't examined their options thoroughly?

You have a salient point. Anyone who plans to pursue the LPN license, in all likelihood, already knows that the RN role exists.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

Here in the Phoenix area there is a program at the Maricopa Skills Center that starts with CNA training and then takes you immediately into LPN training. So it would seem your assertion that these programs don't exist is false, Commuter. There seem to be at least a couple from this thread.
Virtually all LPN programs start with fundamentals training that will render the student eligible to attain certification as a CNA. However, this educational setup is not considered a CNA-to-LPN bridge program.

A true bridge program will enable students to receive significant en bloc transfer credit for their CNA training and experience.

At my school there is a cna-to-lpn and there is a cna-to-adn and I live in Charleston sc

Well, logically speaking, we can also speak of a Kindergarten-to-College program; it's called Primary School :)

Whatever you might be thinking in terms of cna-to-LPN programming, it isn't a shortening of the process in becoming an LPN because one has a CNA certificate. Neither is the ADN college program shortened by having a CNA certificate.

The 'real' bridge program involves taking someone who already has a nursing license (say, LPN) and moving them more quickly through the process of becoming an RN. Or someone who has an Associates nursing degree and "bridging" them into a Bachelor's program (shorter than for someone without a license already).

The elements of CNA work is covered in the fundamentals class of any nursing program, so *sometimes* a little credit is given for having that certificate already. But most often....not. It's just part of Fundamentals, and those who have CNA certs already will just have an easier time of Nursing 101 :)

Hope this clarifies.