Starting Clinicals

Posted
by edenson (New) New

I'm starting clinicals this semester on the neuro unit of a hospital, and was wondering what are some common ailments and medications to be expected. I spoke to one of the nursing professors and she said to be dedicated and it won't matter what type of client you see. It will take care of itself. :confused:

mentalhealthRN

433 Posts

You will be doing a lot of research on each patient you get assigned to. You will have to read up on all the diagnosis he/she has, the meds they are on, etc. Keep in mind that though you are on a neuro unit--as far as meds your patients will be on many meds--some related to their neuro problem and others they are on for chronic conditions, pain, anti-biotics, preventative, etc. So you will learn about meds besides the neuro ones. And you will learn about the co-morbidities your patients have by default--which is good. So just be patient--you will learn as you go. Good luck to you and enjoy your clinicals. And also--though you will have a patient you are assigned to, when you have a free moment here and there--your patient is sleeping, etc. Learn what you can from others. Ask to watch the nurses and your fellow nursing students do procedures. Ask questions. The nurses on the unit can be a good resource--yeah you may find that some don't like to teach students--move on and find the others that do. I found several who loved students and to teach and were flattered to have students look to them for expertise.

ImThatGuy, BSN, RN

2,139 Posts

I spoke to one of the nursing professors and she said to be dedicated and it won't matter what type of client you see. It will take care of itself. :confused:

That indeed sounds like some nursing school mumbo jumbo.

I'd have asked what the heck that meant.

netglow, ASN, RN

4,412 Posts

Nurses, you know very well what that instructor meant with her remark. It means that the OP's focus was SUPPOSED to be neuro, but really it's just going to be medsurg octo patients all with advanced dementia and high fall risk. :) Yeah, guess that is neuro, but OP will be lucky if there is any technically WOW stuff going on. OP if this turns out to be, then yer gonna be running around working up a sweat :)

mentalhealthRN

433 Posts

ONACLEARDAY--wow, a rather negative and not at all useful response. I really think you are reading a bit too much into the instructors response.

netglow, ASN, RN

4,412 Posts

Naw, that's just the way it was for my clincial section in school for neuro. Hey, reality is many floors are really medsurg floors these days. Such is life. Not that the OP won't learn something if this is the case for the OP. Just was a little let down for me as I had thought I'd get specialty specific clinicals throughout and was looking forward to that too. Such is life.

MrazFan

73 Posts

I disagree with the person who said there wouldn't be any WOW stuff going on. I had my last clinical rotation on an ortho/neuro unit and it was a great experience. A lot of my patients were there for ortho stuff, but the neuro ones tended to be really interesting. Strokes, CVAs, spinal injuries, meningitis, seizures, hepatic encephalopathy, to name a few... I think what your instructor meant was if you are well prepared each clinical day, and you do the necessary research about your patients' conditions and meds, you'll be fine.

Good luck!

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience. 6,764 Posts

I would much prefer to see this forum used to offer answers to the question asked.

It should not be place to critique other nurses advice!

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in OB-Gyn/Primary Care/Ambulatory Leadership. Has 16 years experience. 14,116 Posts

I would much prefer to see this forum used to offer answers to the question asked.

It should not be place to critique other nurses advice!

You must not post here much. :)

linearthinker, DNP, RN

Specializes in FNP. Has 25 years experience. 1,688 Posts

I agree w/ Oneclear, that it isn't really going to matter, but some dx I'd expect to see on a neuro floor:

CHI

CVA

TIA

dementia

REad up on the rancho and glascow CS and how do a good neuro check and mini mental status exam. I'm sure they'll teach you when you get there, but you might feel better if it isn't the first time you've heard it.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience. 6,764 Posts

I would research common neuro disorders: epilepsy, brain injuries,CVA's, tumors. .etc. Especially look for nursing interventions and signs and symptoms of increased intra-cranial pressure.

As far as meds, check the neurological med section in you drug manual.

It is unfortunate your instructor did not feel it necessary to answer your well thought out question.

Good luck!:)

NnSweets

57 Posts

Is this your first ever clinical experience or just your first time on a neuro floor?