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So, finally getting to sit on on some interviews..

Specializes in PDN; Burn; Phone triage.

My hospital does panel interviews. I didn't do any when I worked nights but these days I have those sweet, sweet, clinic hours and our clinic is expanding exponentially -- so I have had the wonderful experience of sitting in on panel interviews for numerous RNs, NPs, and MAs/AAs.

I feel like new grads and "millennials" get a lot of flak for showing up to job interviews dressed in club wear and with poorly written resumes. This has not been my experience. Our worst interviewees have all been older, usually with a diverse and fairly current job history. (I say this because I am mindful of folks who have been out of the workforce or at one job for 10-20-30+ years -- although now that I type this, I am not certain how their "excuse" for not having recent job interview experience is any better than a new grad who has never held a Real Job before.)

Y'know how club wear isn't proper interview attire? Neither is coming in dressed like a kindergarten teacher. I have witnessed stretchy capri pants, a bedazzled zebra shirt, over sized t-shirts galore, and even a legit mumu. Lots of flip-flops. Our older candidates are also more likely to come in reeking of cigarette smoke.

One lady brought in a Big Gulp cup and was guzzling from the thing through her entire interview. Another brought breakfast.

Paper resumes: so many "printer errors" or "I just don't know how to work that silly printer!" (Cue nervous laughter.) Resume quality, when we do get one, tends to be better with older candidates but I have seen some egregious formatting and misspellings on the resumes of even 20+ year experienced NPs.

We have had candidates get caught in a lie during the interview. Others go on hateful tangents about patients, direct patient care, and even prior employers.

The newer nurses we have interviewed show up properly dressed, with resumes for everyone, and say all the right things that all the articles on the internet tell you to say. I don't know if the older nurses think they can coast by on experience so they don't do their homework or put effort into the little things that are, yes, less meaningful than experience at the end of the day but can also make or break an interview?

Edit - obviously this is not all older nurses. I work with mostly older nurses and NPs. But we are more likely to say no to an older nurse because of how they acted in the interview than a newer nurse.

Edited by dirtyhippiegirl

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

Yep. It's amazing how stupid some people are when it comes to interviewing -- and it is not limited to any one generation or other sub-group of people. And of course, they will all say that they were treated unfairly in one way or another if anyone asks them about their job search.

flying_ace2

Specializes in Pharmaceutical Research, Operating Room.

One lady brought in a Big Gulp cup and was guzzling from the thing through her entire interview. Another brought breakfast.

Please tell me you're kidding.....

Ok so now to make this post something other than a rant, how about give us newbies a few tips on how to dress, what a perfect resume looks like (even if you don't have a world of experience), how to make yourself more desirable for a prospect employer etc. I went to an interview a few weeks ago and it all seemed to have gone great but then I got that rejection email. I was left wondering where did I go wrong?

Wasn't my lack of experience? The way a presented myself? The fact that I didn't email them or call back 100 times to tell them how grateful I was to meet them and how much I wanted that position? I thought a mere thank you email was enough! I dressed business casual (dress black pants, a button down long sleeve blue shirt and black dressy flats because I just hate heels and wanted to be myself. I did not handle my resume to everyone because I figure they already have it or wouldn't have gotten the interview to begin with (bad assumption?).

Of course bringing a coffee mug or a gulp cup sounds a little ridiculous. I can't eat when I'm nervous so that's no problem for me and this was one of the most nerve wracking interviews I ever had for the simple fact that I really really wanted that OR residency. Oh well, I'm planning to apply again next year. If there's something I'm known for is for being persistent. So it'd be nice to get some advice from the people that do the hiring in their jobs.

What would make you hire someone that might not have as much experience as you'd like but that is highly motivated and really really would appreciate the opportunity?

Oh for the love of Pete, don't let this be an older versus younger nurse thread.

I have seen inappropriate behavior and attire in all age groups.

I have not had to interview for a job in a few years when when I last did, it was after work once. I asked the nurse manager interviewing me if she would be ok with me interviewing in my work scrubs (they were clean as was I) and she was fine with it. I got the job. I did not chew gum or eat or drink anything, nor did I wear perfume or excess jewelry, which I have seen people do.

I had an on the spot drug test via saliva. Might want to tell some people to be prepared for that as well.

Speaking of inappropriate attire, we have a person high in upper mgt who is very fond of wearing really nice dresses/suits and flip-flops in summer. I just cannot understand it.

roser13, ASN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC.

Ok so now to make this post something other than a rant, how about give us newbies a few tips on how to dress, what a perfect resume looks like (even if you don't have a world of experience), how to make yourself more desirable for a prospect employer etc. I went to an interview a few weeks ago and it all seemed to have gone great but then I got that rejection email. I was left wondering where did I go wrong?

Wasn't my lack of experience? The way a presented myself? The fact that I didn't email them or call back 100 times to tell them how grateful I was to meet them and how much I wanted that position? I thought a mere thank you email was enough! I dressed business casual (dress black pants, a button down long sleeve blue shirt and black dressy flats because I just hate heels and wanted to be myself. I did not handle my resume to everyone because I figure they already have it or wouldn't have gotten the interview to begin with (bad assumption?).

Of course bringing a coffee mug or a gulp cup sounds a little ridiculous. I can't eat when I'm nervous so that's no problem for me and this was one of the most nerve wracking interviews I ever had for the simple fact that I really really wanted that OR residency. Oh well, I'm planning to apply again next year. If there's something I'm known for is for being persistent. So it'd be nice to get some advice from the people that do the hiring in their jobs.

What would make you hire someone that might not have as much experience as you'd like but that is highly motivated and really really would appreciate the opportunity?

This thread is 5 years old. Starting a new thread with your questions about interviewing will gather many more looks/responses.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

This thread is 5 years old. Starting a new thread with your questions about interviewing will gather many more looks/responses.
Actually, this thread was started in August 2015, so it is only four months old. In addition, the information presented by the OP is still very much timely and relevant for job seekers.
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