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Should I quit my job

Updated | Posted

So, I recently got a new job in ICU. I was super excited and grateful and At first I thought it was a cute little hospital with great people and some serious team work. I still think that but during my orientation I had some obstacles as in my preceptor being too demanding and expecting perfection (reporting me for minor things like not remembering where exactly each item was in supply room). Then I had a night preceptor (they are best friends btw, and my day preceptor arranged for Me to have this night preceptor). Night preceptor just lied to my manager about me not knowing certain things. I still don’t know if she really thought that or was being mean.

Anyway, my manager kept extending my orientation, telling me she has to make sure I am safe for my patients which I understand but it got to me, seeing some new grads doing way worse than I was doing and still getting off orientation. But eventually I got off my orientation and it has been going well.

During this stressful period I applied to another ICU at University Hospital and got an interview for CVICU (I want to eventually become CRNA and I feel like this would be a way better fit for me comparing to my current community hospital).

I have been off orientation for two weeks/three weeks now. Would it be an awful, terrible, horrible thing to quit my current job and accept the new offer or should I just stick with my job, get a year of experience and try to find something that will help me get into CRNA school? 

Thanks

Sour Lemon

Has 11 years experience.

On 10/19/2020 at 7:51 PM, whatisgonnabemyname said:

So, I recently got a new job in ICU. I was super excited and grateful and At first I thought it was a cute little hospital with great people and some serious team work. I still think that but during my orientation I had some obstacles as in my preceptor being too demanding and expecting perfection (reporting me for minor things like not remembering where exactly each item was in supply room). Then I had a night preceptor (they are best friends btw, and my day preceptor arranged for Me to have this night preceptor). Night preceptor just lied to my manager about me not knowing certain things. I still don’t know if she really thought that or was being mean.

Anyway, my manager kept extending my orientation, telling me she has to make sure I am safe for my patients which I understand but it got to me, seeing some new grads doing way worse than I was doing and still getting off orientation. But eventually I got off my orientation and it has been going well.

During this stressful period I applied to another ICU at University Hospital and got an interview for CVICU (I want to eventually become CRNA and I feel like this would be a way better fit for me comparing to my current community hospital).

I have been off orientation for two weeks/three weeks now. Would it be an awful, terrible, horrible thing to quit my current job and accept the new offer or should I just stick with my job, get a year of experience and try to find something that will help me get into CRNA school? 

Thanks

Would it be awful? Yes, but who cares. They would get rid of you in an instant if they decided they no longer needed you.

On the flip side, this other hospital scares me. Why would they be interested in a new grad who bailed a few weeks after completing  orientation at their first job? That sounds pretty desperate on their end. 

41 minutes ago, Sour Lemon said:

Would it be awful? Yes, but who cares. They would get rid of you in an instant if they decided they no longer needed you.

On the flip side, this other hospital scares me. Why would they be interested in a new grad who bailed a few weeks after completing  orientation at their first job? That sounds pretty desperate on their end. 

Well, I should mention that the new hospital and my previous job hospital are under the same organization. And I still work as a casual at my old hospital. So, in my application I never listed my new ICU experience. So, the company is considering this a transfer.

Without a crystal ball it is awfully hard to predict which place will be better for you.  Just evaluate things as best you can and then make your decision.

But I do wish you all the best.

socal212, CNA

Has 4 years experience.

Are you saying the hospital you're currently working in the ICU at, and the hospital where you applied to the CVICU are owned by the same company?  If so make sure to double check transfer policies.  Especially if this new job doesn't know you're currently an ICU nurse.  I think you should have been truthful about your experience when you applied.  It's easy to burn bridges in healthcare :| 

Jedrnurse, BSN, RN

Specializes in school nurse. Has 29 years experience.

6 hours ago, socal212 said:

Are you saying the hospital you're currently working in the ICU at, and the hospital where you applied to the CVICU are owned by the same company?  If so make sure to double check transfer policies.  Especially if this new job doesn't know you're currently an ICU nurse.  I think you should have been truthful about your experience when you applied.  It's easy to burn bridges in healthcare 😐

For sure! Realistically, the second facility will probably find out anything and everything that they want from the first one, whether or not privacy laws are in place. (And they may not apply if a person works for the "whole" company, not a specific division.)

On 10/20/2020 at 3:32 AM, socal212 said:

Are you saying the hospital you're currently working in the ICU at, and the hospital where you applied to the CVICU are owned by the same company?  If so make sure to double check transfer policies.  Especially if this new job doesn't know you're currently an ICU nurse.  I think you should have been truthful about your experience when you applied.  It's easy to burn bridges in healthcare

No, I worked on gmf at one hospital, remained to work as a casual and started orientation in ICU in a different hospital. Then, a hospital that is within the same organization as the one where I work gmf calls me for an interview based on my gmf experience.

tropsnegRN, ADN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Cardiac, COVID-19, Telemetry. Has 2 years experience.

Either way, your new employer is going to ask during your interview about where you presently work. If I read your posts correctly...you work PRN at a facility, you work in ICU at a different facility newly off orientation, and you have applied for a CVICU position at a facility owned by where you work PRN? If they're considering it a transfer, a lot of places have a minimum of 6 months in current position requirements. This could be different for your position, I don't really know. 

From my initial first review, it looks like job-hopping. You had a poor time on orientation because of two singular employees and you're not giving yourself time to adjust to the culture of the new space. However, just staying somewhere you're not happy isn't that great either. 
 

On 10/20/2020 at 1:43 PM, tropsnegRN said:

Either way, your new employer is going to ask during your interview about where you presently work. If I read your posts correctly...you work PRN at a facility, you work in ICU at a different facility newly off orientation, and you have applied for a CVICU position at a facility owned by where you work PRN? If they're considering it a transfer, a lot of places have a minimum of 6 months in current position requirements. This could be different for your position, I don't really know. 

From my initial first review, it looks like job-hopping. You had a poor time on orientation because of two singular employees and you're not giving yourself time to adjust to the culture of the new space. However, just staying somewhere you're not happy isn't that great either. 

I agree but it is not that I am not happy. As I mentioned, somewhat poor experience during orientation didn't change my opinion of the floor. I still think majority of staff is really nice and helpful, team work is great. Now, orientation did affect me and I feel like everyone thinks I am the one who needs extra time and just not smart enough (but that is in my head I guess).

Another reason I am considering changing jobs is because the other hospital is bigger and better in terms it is university teaching hospital with procedures that my current hospital does not performed (hence I can see and learn more).

speedynurse, ADN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in ER, Pre-Op, PACU.

Would it burn bridges to quit at your current job now? Yes. However, how bad is the current situation and is it bad enough to make that jump. If you feel your current job is on the line and they are still “throwing you under the bus” so to speak, then move on even if it’s burning bridges at one place. If it’s a more stable job now, then try to last a year.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

Appears you do not have an offer, only a interview. This interview is arranged without management and HR knowing you have completed an ICU orientation. You need to give them that information and see if they still want to interview you. They must know your current status, before an interview.

You should do what is best for you, what will make you happy. Work where you feel you will grow and feel like a team. Where you are proud to work. It sounds like you have already decided, and just feel bad about leaving the current place. But at the end of the day it’s your happiness that you need to be concerned with, we are always educating our patients to advocate for themselves and family, well we need to do that too!