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Should I let it go or hanging on to it?

Posted

I started my first RN job in LTC rehap late last year in Dec. I didn't like it because the working environment was awful with non-supportive management and backstabbing staff. Additionally, the workload was too heavy. I barely had time to pee and on my feet 9-10 hrs. Because of this instead of quitting I went on as PRN. Now I got another job in hospital and will start the orientation soon. Please keep in mine, I went PRN because I want it to count as my job experience the amount of time I already put into gaining it. Now I don't mind being PRN and work X amount of days but what I mind is how dreadful it is just to think about going back working there to cover that X amount of days. So my question is, what would you do if you were in my shoes? Would you just quit the first one and forget about or hanging onto awhile longer?

Why don't you wait to see how orientation and the new job is before making any decisions.

Worst case scenario, you don't like the new job either, so then what? Better to have two options you hate but it's adding to your work history.

Best case scenario, you love the new job, you envision yourself really loving it for a long time, so then you can just cut the cord on the LTC and never look back.

classicdame, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Hospital Education Coordinator.

agree. If you are not forced to make a decision now (like health or schedule conflicts, etc) then wait till you have more info

i'm not entirely clear on your situation or question again, but i think you're assuming that if you don't maintain some sort of employee relationship with the ltc that you don't get some sort of credit (with who?) for days worked. is that right?

if it's not, and you're orienting for another job somewhere else, i don't understand why you don't just start your new job and stop working prn at the ltc. am i missing something?

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

Stay PRN/per diem at the LTC facility. Your commitment will be minimal. You do not know if the hospital job will work out quite yet. Wait until you are completely off orientation before you completely let the LTC job go.

We read many stories of nurses who did not make it past their 90 day probationary periods at their hospital jobs. They were let go. I would at least remain at the LTC facility PRN until all the waters are clear at your new job.

GitanoRN, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in Trauma, ER, ICU, CCU, PACU, GI, Cardiology, OR. Has 53 years experience.

first of all, congrats!!! on your new job...and here's my :twocents::twocents: cents on the subject, i'm a true believer in leaving doors open, because one never knows when you might need them. wishing you the best in all of your future endeavors...aloha~

NoviceRN10

Has 5 years experience.

I wish I had thought about the experience time I had "logged" into my first nursing position (tech) before I quit to start my first RN job. I worked 11 months. One month shy of the year that most job postings are asking for experience in that specialty of nursing. It never even occcurred to me to keep that contingent job long enough to be able to say I'd worked there a full year. In your situation, LTC isn't a nursing specialty that requires so much experience time, so I wouldn't worry about hanging on to that job for your resume's sake. Hopefully your new job is one you like a lot better :).

OnlybyHisgraceRN, ASN, RN

Specializes in LTC and School Health.

OP first I congratulate you on your new job. I believe you should stay at your PRN job. Work there only once a month if you have too. Anything could happen where you may need to pick up some extra shifts from the LTCF.

I did the same as you recently. I was working FT at a LTCF. It was a toxic environment with a high turnover rate of nurses. I wanted to quit but instead I went PRN. One, I want to keep the place on my resume, as I worked in skilled nursing and it looked great. I also always like to have a PRN job just in case I need it. A PRN job is like a safety net for me, for some weird reason. I know that no matter what I have options.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych. Has 15 years experience.

Here's another thought. . .

Many hospitals are notorious for cancelling shifts when patient census drops. If you are the type of person who wants or needs a full paycheck, the PRN gig at the LTC facility can fill that hole if your shifts are getting cancelled at the hospital.

Thanks everyone for great input. I think I will keep the PRN position and work my minimal.

i'm not entirely clear on your situation or question again, but i think you're assuming that if you don't maintain some sort of employee relationship with the ltc that you don't get some sort of credit (with who?) for days worked. is that right?

if it's not, and you're orienting for another job somewhere else, i don't understand why you don't just start your new job and stop working prn at the ltc. am i missing something?

i don't want to leave it point blank, because i want able to say i work there for one year. i want it to reflect in my resume.

ah. i see. so x months of full time plus 12-x of prn = one year of experience? mmmm.

OnlybyHisgraceRN, ASN, RN

Specializes in LTC and School Health.

ah. i see. so x months of full time plus 12-x of prn = one year of experience? mmmm.

i don't quite see it as that. the op basically wants her resume to show stability. i see no problem with this as i'm doing the same. my first rn position was 3 months in ltc, i plan to stay prn.

I don't quite see it as that. The OP basically wants her resume to show stability. I see no problem with this as I'm doing the same. My first RN position was 3 months in LTC, I plan to stay PRN.

You couldn't have said it better. Did you find another job already? I know this hospital job might be a big challenge and a major change but nurse-pt ratio is much lower. I prefer to stay focus on pt's complications than try to get the work done because I have so many pts in my care.