Jump to content

Should I get liability insurance?

Posted
chiuli chiuli (Member)

Hi everyone! Today was my first day working as an RN. I finally landed a job in a nursing home and I'm so happy with anything at this point. I'll be honest, I dont like the facility.It has an extremely strong odor, unlike anything I've ever experienced before. All the windows are closed shut and you can smell bleach and other chemicals as the janitor is going by. I got a bad headache at work. Everything in this place is old fashioned. Charting is paper only and all the RN's are over 50 yrs old. The pulse oximetry that I had to do on some of the residents is inaccurate. It showed me that the pulse ox's were in the 80's. When I was hired, my boss came up to me the next day and asked, "So when are you taking the NCLEX?" She asked me this after hiring me and after I showed her my license. I had RN's call me on my Emergency contact number and ask me to work without me having orientation yet

The place is also dirty. Even the nurses station is messy- there is old equipment everywhere, dust bunnies and 10 yr old candy. I'm not sure how long Im going to work here, but should I get insurance?

I currenlty don't have CPR or insurance or a drug book when Im giving these meds.

MassED, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 15 years experience.

you mention multiple issues, some of which are contradictory. You state how there is the strong odor of bleach (which means someone is trying to clean), then state how it's so dirty. Most nursing homes I have been in have strong odors, for many reasons, albeit clothing, body odors, or patients bodily fluids. You can't and will not change that. So what if the charting is written? So what is the staff is 50 yrs old or over?? How do either of those things make is substandard? I think an employer asking if you've passed your NCLEX is an honest question. You can be hired prior to passing/or even taking the NCLEX, so don't be offended. Sounds like that place (like most NH's) are hard up for nurses, which again, is not unusual. Be glad you have a job.

As for where you live, look at the nursing practice act (and the facility standard for nurses) as to whether or not you should carry CPR.

It's silly NOT to have a drug book when passing meds you're unsure of... you should buy one, not expect that one will provided to you by a facility. That is the same as expecting a facility to provide a stethoscope for you to perform an assessment. You need to be proactive in your nursing practice.

As to your final question, that is up to you, but most nurses will tell you they have liability coverage. In the end, a facility is out to protect themselves, not you.

Oh, and don't eat the 10 year old candy, but you'll find out that if you're starving, that might look pretty good after a long stressful shift....

Edited by MassED

savnlivzPRN, LVN

Has 2 years experience.

I would say the safe bet would be to get insurance reguardless of where you work...

I mean good ol' CYB never fails...

Good luck...

OttawaRPN

Specializes in acute care med/surg, LTC, orthopedics. Has 5 years experience.

Hi everyone! Today was my first day working as an RN. I finally landed a job in a nursing home and I'm so happy with anything at this point. I'll be honest, I dont like the facility.It has an extremely strong odor, unlike anything I've ever experienced before. All the windows are closed shut and you can smell bleach and other chemicals as the janitor is going by. I got a bad headache at work. Everything in this place is old fashioned. Charting is paper only and all the RN's are over 50 yrs old. The pulse oximetry that I had to do on some of the residents is inaccurate. It showed me that the pulse ox's were in the 80's. When I was hired, my boss came up to me the next day and asked, "So when are you taking the NCLEX?" She asked me this after hiring me and after I showed her my license. I had RN's call me on my Emergency contact number and ask me to work without me having orientation yet

The place is also dirty. Even the nurses station is messy- there is old equipment everywhere, dust bunnies and 10 yr old candy. I'm not sure how long Im going to work here, but should I get insurance?

I currenlty don't have CPR or insurance or a drug book when Im giving these meds.

And you believe this is inaccurate because............ ??

I check the oximetry on myself. Im always over 98%

MassED, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 15 years experience.

I check the oximetry on myself. Im always over 98%

the point the poster was making was why do you not believe that the RESIDENT'S pulse ox was NOT accurate??? Especially knowing that yours was normal, then that proves the accuracy of that pulse oximeter.... so again, why would you not address that oxygen saturation?

Get insurance immediately. You can be sued as an individual and as an employee. I am retired but I remember being sued as an individual and as an employee. Fortunately I had carried my own insurance. It was a good thing because I was sued while being unable to work because of a car accident. It took a year but the court finally dismissed the suit with prejudice, meaning I could be sued again by the same client/attorney. I always carried my own insurance, from my first to my last job.

I don't know where you are praticing but this place sounds like it is on the edge. As soon as possible, I would seek employment else where.

Good luck

GrannyRN65

I think OP meant that she tested her own 02 sat and it was also in the 80's? and not likely that all the residents she checked would be in the 80's? At least that is how I read it. I agree that it is best to carry your own insurance.

OCNRN63, RN

Specializes in Oncology; medical specialty website.

I was going to be sympathetic till you whined about all the nurses being 50 years old.

You're on your own, now.

(FWIW, what are you doing working without current CPR or a drug book?)

Meriwhen, ASN, BSN, RN

Specializes in Psych ICU, addictions.

Get insurance immediately. Most insurance companies will let you sign up online, and coverage begins the minute you hit the Payment button (or shortly thereafter). Should anything ever happen, your facility is NOT going to bend over backwards to protect you...if anything, they'll throw you under the bus to save their own hide.

Then get BLS/CPR certification immediately, because even with Liability Insurance covering you, a lawyer will have a field day if something ever goes to court and they find out that you didn't have BLS. Depending on the state you live in, so will your BON.

Then go get a drug book. Get a basic cheap one at the bookstore, or see if you can check one out at the library (and renew it...and renew it...and renew it...). Keep it with you when working, and take it home at the end of the day so it doesn't wander off.

And while you're doing all of this, start looking for another job...seriously. The fact that they've hired you without your having active BLS/CPR, as well as trying to get you to work before you're even done with orientation, are bigger red flags than the condition of the facility itself.

BabyLady, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU, Post-partum.

Hi everyone! Today was my first day working as an RN. I finally landed a job in a nursing home and I'm so happy with anything at this point. I'll be honest, I dont like the facility.It has an extremely strong odor, unlike anything I've ever experienced before. All the windows are closed shut and you can smell bleach and other chemicals as the janitor is going by. I got a bad headache at work. Everything in this place is old fashioned. Charting is paper only and all the RN's are over 50 yrs old. The pulse oximetry that I had to do on some of the residents is inaccurate. It showed me that the pulse ox's were in the 80's. When I was hired, my boss came up to me the next day and asked, "So when are you taking the NCLEX?" She asked me this after hiring me and after I showed her my license. I had RN's call me on my Emergency contact number and ask me to work without me having orientation yet

The place is also dirty. Even the nurses station is messy- there is old equipment everywhere, dust bunnies and 10 yr old candy. I'm not sure how long Im going to work here, but should I get insurance?

I currenlty don't have CPR or insurance or a drug book when Im giving these meds.

You don't need Liability Insurance if...

1. You think that you will never be unjustly accused.

2. Have tons of cash to pay a lawyer if you are to represent you...b/c the other side will have one.

3. Will never make an honest mistake.

himilayaneyes

Specializes in Critical Care/Coronary Care Unit,.

It sounds like you're setting yourself up for a lawsuit. As a healthcare provider, you shouldn't be working without CPR. I suggest you go take a BLS for healthcare providers class asap. If something happens to a resident and you don't do cpr correctly...guess what happens to you. Whether or not you take a cpr class or not, you'll be held to the standards of your license. Also, (please know I'm not trying to be mean), you have no reason to give a drug that you know nothing about. There are too many resources out there that you can utilize. You don't have to carry a huge drug guide...get a pocket one. You have a pda or a smart phone then download an app about medications. You need to know about the meds you're giving...common side effects and adverse reactions. As a nurse you are licensed to pass meds...even if the doc orders it.. the nurse is the last stop between the patient and a med error. Would you give propanalol to an asthmatic? Would you give a patient lipitor who says that the med gives him muscle cramps, etc? Would you give ativan to a lethargic patient? Please use your resources....for your sake and most of all for the patient's sake. They make these resources like drug guides b/c no one can memorize everything. Also get Liability Insurance. Your job won't protect you.

P.S. Look for another job. A facility that hires a RN w/o CPR isn't about patient safety.

MassED, BSN, RN

Specializes in ER. Has 15 years experience.

I think OP meant that she tested her own 02 sat and it was also in the 80's? and not likely that all the residents she checked would be in the 80's? At least that is how I read it. I agree that it is best to carry your own insurance.

I didn't read it that way.