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Babyboss 19 Babyboss 19 (Member)

Second Thoughts on leaving Bedside for NP role

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You are reading page 3 of Second Thoughts on leaving Bedside for NP role. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

No, I can't leave FL due to elderly parent obligations. So, yes anyone considering moving to FL as an NP should reconsider. Good luck in your career babyNP and thanks again!

I just saw your reply about not being able to relocate out of Florida due to elderly obligations. Would it be possible for them to move with you? I know that's not a always feasible, but worth a try? You can always reevaluate if your current situation changes. Good luck

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DesertSky, thank you and hang in there! You're almost done. It's the best feeling. I'm not going to lie, I cried. Better than RN graduation. Be proud!

Bedside has not been bad for me in NICU. The wear and tear is minimal since our patients our little. I work with a few RNs well into their 60's who can run circles around the youngsters! These ladies are awesome clinical resources. But, yes I can see how that will still become more difficult over time. As an NP student, though, I saw 30 to 35 patients (or more) a day with my preceptor. A documentation/physical marathon! And I was just shadowing, minimal documentation as the student. THAT was exhausting compared to a 2 or 3 patient NICU assignment. But that's the reality of pediatric offices. My own family ARNP compared her work in a pediatrician's office to a puppy mill. She wished me good luck.

Regarding my former experience? Not necessarily a positive to any new grads in the same situation reading this. It probably won't be your strongest selling point. Only half of my interviewers asked about my RN experience. Why? Because they aren't comparable roles. They just aren't. Most employers care more about your flexibility, ability to commute, work weekends, take call, and be bilingual. Besides, it benefits them to hire a younger grad that they can pay less and mold into a minion. Of course a starting PNP salary of 80K/year looks amazing to a new 20-something RN who's been making 15K less! Here's a prime example: University of FL at Shands posted a PNP ENT specialty salary online 2 months ago...salary $37/hr!! They should be ashamed. However, I bet someone took it.

I am only willing to compromise to an extent. I'm an astute problem solver with life experience and proven medical judgement. This is my selling point instead. Then they can ask for examples if still interested at that point.

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Do it now (become and np) and don't look back!!!

Bedside = death... For work-life balance, health, etc...

Get out now while you can!

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What a great variety of advice. Here's my story: became and LPN at 32, RN at 32 and APRN at 48. Been in nephrology for almost 13 years now with a brief foray (6 months into heart failure). I figure I can easily work till I'm 70 at this job. Best salary in the area and by far the best benefits.

That said, I loved loved loved my bedside level 1 trauma center job. It was the most awesome, bestest in the world job. However, at 60, would I want to be working 12 hour nights and every other weekend? Nope, I've moved on from needing the constant adrenaline rush. I still volunteer on my rural EMS squad ad t that is enough adrenaline for me.

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For all the reasons that have been outlined in this thread, I changed course from NP to CNS. A lot of it had to do with being one of those bedside RN's with lots of experience... I realized I wanted to keep practicing what I know, build on what I know and use what I know in whatever future job capacity my MSN will afford me. I am going to an affordable school and will have no debt from my MSN.

Like TraumaRUs, I love my bedside job. I'll not be leaving it hastily after obtaining the MSN. It's gonna have to be the right thing. That said -- I'm doing this MSN, in part, because the job I love so much IS physically very demanding. It's no problem right now, as I'm relatively young, fit and healthy -- but even so -- an injury would sideline me. So I want options and preferably ones that lead up the ladder. I think I'll have that.

OP, congratulations! You NOW have options!! You don't have to leave (nor should you) the bedside until you are ready. You may be able to score a minimal hours per diem PNP job at a health clinic or something -- or even volunteer to practice your skills (have liability insurance either way). Also, I know NPs who are working in other capacities inpatient --- usually practice support type roles -- so no, they are not working as providers, but they are in those positions because of their MSNs. Your MSN has more mileage on it than just a provider role. This is good news!

There are quite a few MSN nurses working at the bedside. Those with APRN degrees/credentials have a wider range of options. None of that solves the big problems in advanced practice nursing, but for the OP, who has lots of bedside experience, owns her home, and has no student loans... she's not in a completely awful position.

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Babyboss congrats on finishing school and passing your boards. The fact that you graduated with no debt is amazing and you can take your time to find the right job for you. Florida pays crappy true but there are jobs that will pay you will just have to patient and work prn and keep your RN job. I knew a NP. in Florida that waited 1 before she finally moved into her role as a primary care NP because she wanted a job that was the right match for her. You have options and that's a good thing also if you stayed at bedside would your salary increase over be the next 10yrs compared to a PNP?

Good luck in your decision!

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My situation is similar to yours, but I chose the MSN-Ed route. I went to a state school & paid my way through (like you, no debt). I have had several opportunities open up because of my MSN, but all pay same/less than bedside nursing. Ultimately I ended up with a job that pays about $10 less per hour than I was making at the hospital, but I do have a pension now (not offered at the hospital). It's a little less money, but the schedule & stress level are much better.

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