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Rude Awakening Concerning Clinical Instructors

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I always considered myself a good student. I already have a masters degree in business. Each week I always try to prepare the best way I can for clinicals. I received a good evaluation on my midterm evaluation. This past week, my clinical instrutor wrote me up saying that I came unprepared because I had a question about one of the meds I was going to give to my patient. :angryfire I did the research on the drug the night before, but I still had a question about it. I asked the instructor during clinical hours and she said that I should have used other resources besides my drug book or other textbooks to answer my question. I felt like telling her "well what are you here for?" :uhoh3:

I'm convinced that clinical instructors should instead be called clincal supervisors. I now believe that they are there to observe and not teach or mentor. If they feel that a student is not learning what they're supposed to be learning before clinicals, it seems like they're trying to weed people out. This would be like a new hire at a job who is on a 90 day probationary period. The instructor's assignments are fragmented meaning that she'll say one way she wants an assignment done and then she expects it handed in another way. This instructor may very well be an excellent professional nurse, however her communication and teaching skills are little to be disired. :rolleyes:

what do u mean wrote u up? write u up where? and for a question??

dont worry too much about it. as long as ur performing satisfactorily (ie ur not harming any pt, u do any asssignment she gives u) in clinicals thats all that matters. she can write whatever she wants.

a lot of instructors like to rattle up students. not clear why. maybe some kind of power trip or something. dont let it bother u.

ktwlpn, LPN, RN

Specializes in Med Surg, Homecare, Hospice.

I always considered myself a good student. I already have a masters degree in business. Each week I always try to prepare the best way I can for clinicals. I received a good evaluation on my midterm evaluation. This past week, my clinical instrutor wrote me up saying that I came unprepared because I had a question about one of the meds I was going to give to my patient. :angryfire I did the research on the drug the night before, but I still had a question about it. I asked the instructor during clinical hours and she said that I should have used other resources besides my drug book or other textbooks to answer my question. I felt like telling her "well what are you here for?" :uhoh3:

I'm convinced that clinical instructors should instead be called clincal supervisors. I now believe that they are there to observe and not teach or mentor. If they feel that a student is not learning what they're supposed to be learning before clinicals, it seems like they're trying to weed people out. This would be like a new hire at a job who is on a 90 day probationary period. The instructor's assignments are fragmented meaning that she'll say one way she wants an assignment done and then she expects it handed in another way. This instructor may very well be an excellent professional nurse, however her communication and teaching skills are little to be disired. :rolleyes:

Part of that is encouraging you to develope and utilize your critical thinking skills.We were encouraged to obtain as much info independetky as possible especially in clinicals....As a nurse I can tell you there is nothing more frustrating then students and newbie nurses constantly asking you questions that they should be finding the answers to-like drug compatibility and such or how to mix insulins....If you don't make the effirt to find the info on your own you won't retain it as well....

Audreyfay

Specializes in Everything but psych!. Has 31 years experience.

I agree about the clinical supervisors role. They really don't want to teach. They want you to know and do, with them making sure you do it right. Not the right way to do it, is it? "If we ran the world......."

mariedoreen

Specializes in Med-Surg. Has 3 years experience.

Part of that is encouraging you to develope and utilize your critical thinking skills.We were encouraged to obtain as much info independetky as possible especially in clinicals....As a nurse I can tell you there is nothing more frustrating then students and newbie nurses constantly asking you questions that they should be finding the answers to-like drug compatibility and such or how to mix insulins....If you don't make the effirt to find the info on your own you won't retain it as well....

Yes, I understand this argument very well and agree with it; however, if a clinical instructor equates asking a question with being unprepared and writes the student up... how likely is it that that student or any of the others who know of this incident will turn to the instructor for help again? And when they do not, the risk that patient care will be compromised increases...

akcarmean, LPN

Specializes in Home Health Care,LTC.

I had a clinical instructor like that. We went through 4 or 5 instructors. They couldn't keep the position filled. I believe that the onsite clinical instructor should also be there to help you learn. A person is completely different than a dummy. If you check all the resources you had they should have helped you. If you only checked 1 then you should have used more in order to help you retain the information. Good luck.

Angelia

Hmmmmm.....I had never questioned an instructor until this last semester. The only thing she focused on was drugs. I understand how important giving the right meds to the right person etc......but what about the other care -- dressing changes, basic RN skills etc, we had no help from her here. As long as the meds were right she could have cared less. Is this the education I expected or wanted, no. But this is what I got.

My only advice is to try to determine what your clinical instrutor wants and give it to them.

I am sure you have a syllabus regarding your clinicals. Read it carefully. There is usually some flowery language about expectations and prep time. It's usually defined. Additionally, there should be something in writing regarding instructor involvement. If you don't have either of those in writing, all the more reason to dispute. If you do have it, you may want to ask for clarity on the description since you feel you fell within the described guidelines. BS I tell ya! That's just plain ole BS!

not now, RN

Specializes in LTC, med-surg, critial care. Has 3 years experience.

I had the instructor last semester. I thought I'd die. All you can do is listen, nod your head and try better next time. Really, there is no way to get around her.

This semester our clinical instructor does nothing but teach. He'll stand in the hallway with you and explain your patients condition, labs, procedures, ect if he feels you don't fully understand it or if you're foggy on things and need clarification. Granted he'll ride my butt if I'm unprepared but for the most part he knows we're not nurses and there to learn as much as possible. I love him.

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