Jump to content

Resignation Letter- please inspect

Posted

Specializes in Hospitalist.

Hi to all,

I'm just looking for a critique on my letter of resignation that I will turn in to my manager next week. I'm really going for a nicey-nice exit. I want it as sweet as can be because I don't think she'll take it well. Some of you already know my husband is a quadriplegic, and for those who didn't, well now you know! :wink2: I mention it b/c it has led to some difficulty that applies here. Anyway, when I was interviewed, I was told all they had were night positions. I was looking for days b/c I can't leave my husband at home alone at night. His brothers help, but they have lives, too, and they can't always be there. Hired help is almost nowhere to be found in my area, so no go there either. At any rate, she really wanted to hire me b/c she said she liked my attitude and confidence (or she really needed somebody BAD, I don't know.) She said that if I signed on, then I could put my name on the transfer-to-dayshift list, which was currently empty, so I would be the first to get a day position as soon as one opened. She also said that the wait was never too long, maybe 3-4 months tops b/c the current workers often shifted around anyway for the extra $ on nights. So I said okay, I'd give it a shot.

I put my name on the transfer-to-dayshift list and 6 months go by... My husband's brothers are nice about it, but I'm sure they were wondering when the heck I was going to days at this point. And a slot opened up! But, wait a minute, I get jumped by another nurse with more seniority who wants days all of a sudden, but isn't on the list. So she gets the day position... Okay, if seniority was how I was told it was determined, then this would be fine, but I was told that they go by the list, not seniority. When I asked, I was told, well, she just had a baby and decided she needed days. Okay, well, she knew at least 7 months ago, I'm sure, but her name's not on the list. Whatever, I let it slide b/c I'm an idiot I guess.

Well, it's been almost a year now and still no day position for me. Can't do this anymore. Not only am I one of those unfortunate folks whose body can't seem to adjust to nights, but also I have to think of my husband's brothers who are bound to get worn out doing this. They shower him, lay him down, stay the night, and get him up and ready for his job in the am when I'm working. And they do it for free. I don't want to overstay their charity, you know?

Anyway, I've come to this determination at a bad time for my manager. One night nurse just quit, another night nurse is having a surgery that will keep her out for 6-8 weeks. And now one day shift nurse has gotten very ill. B/c of these absent nurses, our unit will now have mandatory overtime, too. *Sigh* As if I needed more nights to work. However, a perfect job kind of just fell out of the sky into my lap, and there's no way I can say no right now. So I don't want her to think I'm running out on her all of the sudden, but I kind of have to. I'll still work 2-3 weeks to help out, but that's it. So, anyway, after all this huge post, if you're still reading, then please proof-read my resignation letter and tell me if you think anything should be added/subtracted. Thanks to all! :bow:

P.S. I've been very comfortable talking with this person while I've worked for her, so that's why the letter may seem so personal-sounding.

Dear *****,

I am so very sorry to be writing this. I have very much enjoyed working for you. This was my first real RN position after taking the NCLEX, and so it will always be remembered fondly. Unfortunate circumstances at home have forced me to look elsewhere for employment, though. I had hoped to be able to transfer to a dayshift position by now, but I understand the reasons I have been kept to night shift. This is the main reason I am having to resign from my position here.

I have recently been offered, out of the blue, a position that fits perfectly with my home life situation at the moment. I can only hope this means it is meant to be this way. I will try to help accommodate my co-workers as best I can during my last scheduled weeks. This floor deserves to have someone who can be dedicated to night shift, and due to my circumstances, I just can't be that person now.

Thank you again for your understanding and patience with me. I will miss you and all of my co-workers terribly. They have helped me to gain the high level of confidence that I now possess about my nursing skills, and they will have my gratitude always.

dear *****,

i am so very sorry to be writing this. i have very much enjoyed working for you. this was my first real rn position after taking the nclex, and so it will always be remembered fondly. unfortunate circumstances at home have forced me to look elsewhere for employment, though. i had hoped to be able to transfer to a dayshift position by now, but i understand the reasons i have been kept to night shift. this is the main reason i am having to resign from my position here.

i have recently been offered, out of the blue, a position that fits perfectly with my home life situation at the moment. i can only hope this means it is meant to be this way. i will try to help accommodate my co-workers as best i can during my last scheduled weeks. this floor deserves to have someone who can be dedicated to night shift, and due to my circumstances, i just can't be that person now.

thank you again for your understanding and patience with me. i will miss you and all of my co-workers terribly. they have helped me to gain the high level of confidence that i now possess about my nursing skills, and they will have my gratitude always.

it looks good, sounds professional and is well written. if the letter is intended not to burn any bridges, i believe you have achieved your goal. i highlighted the word "though" because it seemed out of place to me, but its a matter of opinion.

good luck in your new job. it sounds like your husband and yourself have a pretty supportive family. count your blessings (as i'm sure you do).

First, congratulations for finding a position that fits better with your schedule. Personally, I would not submit the letter you have written. Even if you are very friendly with your employer your letter of resignation should be more professional. I suggest that you leave all of the niceties for the conversation you will probably have with her when you submit the letter. In fact, I would make time to hand deliver the letter and explain, in person, what you have stated in your letter - especially since you know that she is not going to take it well, you should have a few lines practiced that you can repeat over and over if she tries to convince you to stay. You formal letter, submitted to your direct manager and copied to human resources of the hospital should be something simple like this

Dear Nurse Manager Name:

I regret to inform you that I am resigning from my position as "night shift RN for Nice Hospital". My last day of employment will be March X, 2009. Thank you for the support and the opportunities that you have provided me during the last year. I have enjoyed working with you and my co-workers.

If I can be of any assistance during this transition, please let me know. I would be glad to help however I can.

Respectfully Submitted,

Bumashes

Bumashes, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Hospitalist.

First, congratulations for finding a position that fits better with your schedule. Personally, I would not submit the letter you have written. Even if you are very friendly with your employer your letter of resignation should be more professional. I suggest that you leave all of the niceties for the conversation you will probably have with her when you submit the letter. In fact, I would make time to hand deliver the letter and explain, in person, what you have stated in your letter - especially since you know that she is not going to take it well, you should have a few lines practiced that you can repeat over and over if she tries to convince you to stay. You formal letter, submitted to your direct manager and copied to human resources of the hospital should be something simple like this

Dear Nurse Manager Name:

I regret to inform you that I am resigning from my position as "night shift RN for Nice Hospital". My last day of employment will be March X, 2009. Thank you for the support and the opportunities that you have provided me during the last year. I have enjoyed working with you and my co-workers.

If I can be of any assistance during this transition, please let me know. I would be glad to help however I can.

Respectfully Submitted,

Bumashes

Oh yes, I definitely will be turning it in directly in person. I am toying with the idea of the more formal letter, too. Maybe I should bring both kinds, see how the discussion goes, and then hand in the appropriate letter. LOL! I hate thinking about this stuff on my days off... :)

iluvivt, BSN, RN

Specializes in Infusion Nursing, Home Health Infusion. Has 32 years experience.

It is way too long and needs to more direct and to the point.

Dear so and so,

This is to inform you that effective March 10, 2009 I will resign my position on night shift. I

appreciate the personal and professional growth I have experienced and the relationships I have established.I value all the support you have given me during my employment.

Respectfully,_______________

Once a manager reads you are resigning they do not want to read a long letter and you do not need to explain why you are leaving and that you secured another job. They probably know WHY already!!!!!!!!

Bumashes, MSN, APRN, NP

Specializes in Hospitalist.

Once a manager reads you are resigning they do not want to read a long letter and you do not need to explain why you are leaving and that you secured another job. They probably know WHY already!!!!!!!!

LOL! Too true, too true. Looks like the advice of the majority so far is a more formal letter. I guess I may just go that route then. Thanks everyone. :typing

OrlandoFLNurse2b

Specializes in Surgical ICU, Anesthesia. Has 2 years experience.

Hi to all,

I'm just looking for a critique on my letter of resignation that I will turn in to my manager next week. I'm really going for a nicey-nice exit. I want it as sweet as can be because I don't think she'll take it well. Some of you already know my husband is a quadriplegic, and for those who didn't, well now you know! :wink2: I mention it b/c it has led to some difficulty that applies here. Anyway, when I was interviewed, I was told all they had were night positions. I was looking for days b/c I can't leave my husband at home alone at night. His brothers help, but they have lives, too, and they can't always be there. Hired help is almost nowhere to be found in my area, so no go there either. At any rate, she really wanted to hire me b/c she said she liked my attitude and confidence (or she really needed somebody BAD, I don't know.) She said that if I signed on, then I could put my name on the transfer-to-dayshift list, which was currently empty, so I would be the first to get a day position as soon as one opened. She also said that the wait was never too long, maybe 3-4 months tops b/c the current workers often shifted around anyway for the extra $ on nights. So I said okay, I'd give it a shot.

I put my name on the transfer-to-dayshift list and 6 months go by... My husband's brothers are nice about it, but I'm sure they were wondering when the heck I was going to days at this point. And a slot opened up! But, wait a minute, I get jumped by another nurse with more seniority who wants days all of a sudden, but isn't on the list. So she gets the day position... Okay, if seniority was how I was told it was determined, then this would be fine, but I was told that they go by the list, not seniority. When I asked, I was told, well, she just had a baby and decided she needed days. Okay, well, she knew at least 7 months ago, I'm sure, but her name's not on the list. Whatever, I let it slide b/c I'm an idiot I guess.

Well, it's been almost a year now and still no day position for me. Can't do this anymore. Not only am I one of those unfortunate folks whose body can't seem to adjust to nights, but also I have to think of my husband's brothers who are bound to get worn out doing this. They shower him, lay him down, stay the night, and get him up and ready for his job in the am when I'm working. And they do it for free. I don't want to overstay their charity, you know?

Anyway, I've come to this determination at a bad time for my manager. One night nurse just quit, another night nurse is having a surgery that will keep her out for 6-8 weeks. And now one day shift nurse has gotten very ill. B/c of these absent nurses, our unit will now have mandatory overtime, too. *Sigh* As if I needed more nights to work. However, a perfect job kind of just fell out of the sky into my lap, and there's no way I can say no right now. So I don't want her to think I'm running out on her all of the sudden, but I kind of have to. I'll still work 2-3 weeks to help out, but that's it. So, anyway, after all this huge post, if you're still reading, then please proof-read my resignation letter and tell me if you think anything should be added/subtracted. Thanks to all! :bow:

P.S. I've been very comfortable talking with this person while I've worked for her, so that's why the letter may seem so personal-sounding.

Dear *****,

I have very much enjoyed working for you. I will always remember this position fondly. Right now, circumstances at home have forced me to look elsewhere for employment. Unfortunately, I haven't been transferred to dayshift and as a result, I am having to resign my position here.

Recently, I have been offered a position that fits my home life situation and I can only hope this means it is meant to be this way. I will try to help accommodate my co-workers as best I can during my last scheduled weeks. This floor deserves to have someone who can be dedicated to night shift, and unfortunately, due to my circumstances, I just can't be that person now.

In advance, thank you for your understanding and patience with me. I will miss you and all of my co-workers terribly. They have helped me to gain the highest level of confidence that I now possess about my nursing skills, and they will have my gratitude always.

I changed it just a little. Congrats on your new job! :yeah:

cardiacRN2006, ADN, RN

Specializes in Cardiac.

My last resignation letter said this,

Dear ....'

This is a letter to inform you that I am resigning, with my last day being (date).

Thank you, CardiacRN

Short, sweet, to the point. No explainations or excuses.

I would definitely go with a formal letter of resignation. Part of the reason is that the person you hand that letter to is not the only person who will likely see that letter. I would imagine it will go to HR and be placed in your file. Not only then will the HR person who files it see it, but so too will any HR person and possibly manager who looks to rehire you there in the future if that situation should ever arise. Considering the fact that why you are resigning is your business and your business alone, I think passing on any explanation that you feel inclined to provide should be done in person. I also think it would tend to sound more genuine that way. Finally, as with bringing a copy of both types of letters, providing an explanation face to face allows you to change your mind about how much you share (and to a much greater degree than with bringing two different letters) based on how the conversation progresses. Like I stated in the first sentence though, I would write a formal letter. What you do is entirely up to you, so I wish you good luck!

Give them 2 weeks notice/no explanations/Cardiacs letter is perfect...

UM Review RN, ASN, RN

Specializes in Utilization Management.

I've quit from a few jobs. The formal letter is the one to go with.

rngolfer53

Has 2 years experience.

I didn't see the effective date of your resignation. Otherwise looks fine.

I agree, the formal letter only is needed with the effective date of resignation with your last work day.

kellykelly

Specializes in cardiac. Has 10 years experience.

I see the point of arguing for the more formal letter, but your letter is nice and may foster some goodwill if you ever need to or decide to go back. I'd take out the "though" as highlighted in read in an earlier post. Make sure you add your intended date of resignation.

Jolie, BSN

Specializes in Maternal - Child Health. Has 35 years experience.

It is never necessary and rarely helpful to the employee to offer a reason for a resignation. A short, professional letter should be submitted in person, if at all possible. Feel free to discuss your reasons with your manager if you like, but don't put them in writing.

Your letter will be kept in your personnel file. 10 years from now, you may wish to repply to this hospital. Your manager and co-workers will be gone by then. A hiring manager will look in your file and see that you had a complicated personal life that limited your availability for work. You'll not be considered for the job.

In resignation letters, less is more.

Best of luck to you!

A hiring manager will look in your file and see that you had a complicated personal life that limited your availability for work. You'll not be considered for the job.

In resignation letters, less is more.

Best of luck to you!

Jolie said precisely what I'm thinking. Never give anyone any chance to look negatively at you or your situation; you might need to work there again in the future.

wonderbee, BSN, RN

Specializes in critical care; community health; psych.

Nice letter but too much information in writing. With the best of intentions, it could come back to haunt you if you want to come back to that employer. You want to give yourself as much wiggle room as possible.

No reason you can't verbalize how you feel about things to your supervisor.

Congrats on your new position.

ghillbert, MSN, NP

Specializes in CTICU. Has 20 years experience.

I agree - short and succinct is the way to go, with no apologies (you're NOT sorry, or you wouldn't leave!), no excuses and no plans for where you're going. This is just for the HR file. Tell your manager in person what you want to say - and I would definitely tell her I was leaving because she did not fulfil her promise!

Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.