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Rejected from dream job

Posted

So I have about a year and a half of med surg nursing under my belt. I made it through two rounds of interviewing and a shadow on my dream unit and got good feedback from everyone until I was told today that I was not chosen. I guess I would just like to hear your similar stories on this topic. I guess I shouldn't have gotten my hopes up too soon? It just seems like they spent a lot of time and energy interviewing me to not end up choosing me. I've been "rejected" from job opportunities before but never after having gone that far into the interviewing process. I'm basically just disappointed and kicking myself for being so upset over it but any kind words/similar stories to share would be appreciated!

Peace and love.

Edited by Brian S.

They did not spend that much time on you for nothing. Make sure to send a nice thank you note and let them know you are still interested in further opportunities. If this really is your dream job I might go as far as order a box of cookies or a tray of fruit with a thank you note to the staff.

I would not be surprised that if you keep contact with them you will be chosen right away in the next round of hiring.

I agree with Flatline. It's not that you were "rejected," it's just that you didn't make the cut this time. Rejected would be "don't ever apply here again!" :) The fact that you made it that far in the process indicates you were considered a competitive candidate. I would send a thank-you note indicating you remain interested in positions there, and keep an eye out for future openings.

KatieMI, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in ICU, LTACH, Internal Medicine. Has 7 years experience.

Well...

I really dislike when people are lying into my face. I understand that's what HR and management are living and breathing with and that nowadays lying became a socially acceptable and even expected behavior but it doesn't make it right.

Thank you note? Maybe. Goodies? H*** no. And I would really, really evaluate if I want ever work in place where people are lying to each other.

Sour Lemon

Has 9 years experience.

Well...

I really dislike when people are lying into my face. I understand that's what HR and management are living and breathing with and that nowadays lying became a socially acceptable and even expected behavior but it doesn't make it right.

Thank you note? Maybe. Goodies? H*** no. And I would really, really evaluate if I want ever work in place where people are lying to each other.

Where do you see "lying into my face"? I did just wake up. Maybe I'm missing something?

Pixie.RN, MSN, RN, EMT-P

Specializes in EMS, ED, Trauma, CNE, CEN, CPEN, TCRN. Has 12 years experience.

Where do you see "lying into my face"? I did just wake up. Maybe I'm missing something?

I didn't see it either, but I am running on 4 hours of sleep, soooooo.... Lol.

OP, I am guessing it wasn't an easy decision for them. Definitely keep in touch with them so they can select you next time there is an opportunity!

KatieMI, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in ICU, LTACH, Internal Medicine. Has 7 years experience.

Where do you see "lying into my face"? I did just wake up. Maybe I'm missing something?

I pretty much know that management (as well as more experienced nurses) can tell if an applicant has good prospects for hiring in that particular unit or not within 5 to 10 min max. Everything else is BS and more of it. So, when an applicant is interviewed TWICE and told all good words about how great he/she is and then rejected, it means that the applicant was lied into face all the time. Been there, had that.Then was on the other side once, and flat refused any further participation in anything like it, out of moral background reasons.

Please do not make yourself into illusions that "it was a difficult decision" and "they do not spend that much time on nothing". They interview people with no intent to hire whatsoever all the time - to avoid internal hiring to be seen as discriminative as it is, to use good old "carrot technique" to keep applicant pool fresh and running, to occupy themselves (yeah, in some unionized facilities they have a kind of plan to interview, say X% and number of "minority" candidates each year, and since many times such candidates cannot be identified by names, people are just called for interview till numbers stay right), to cover the fact that BFF of the daughter of the double removed cousin of the NM got to have job after school.

In fact, double interview is one red flag about "false interview". They use this technique pretty often to show off to the world how much they "care" about their staff.

Read some professional HR message boards. After I did that, I got a strong impression that I will never shake a hand with any of these people. And I do not feel that much for management, either.

Edited by KatieMI

I pretty much know that management (as well as more experienced nurses) can tell if an applicant has good prospects for hiring in that particular unit or not within 5 to 10 min max. Everything else is BS and more of it. So, when an applicant is interviewed TWICE and told all good words about how great he/she is and then rejected, it means that the applicant was lied into face all the time. Been there, had that.Then was on the other side once, and flat refused any further participation in anything like it, out of moral background reasons.

Please do not make yourself into illusions that "it was a difficult decision" and "they do not spend that much time on nothing". They interview people with no intent to hire whatsoever all the time - to avoid internal hiring to be seen as discriminative as it is, to use good old "carrot technique" to keep applicant pool fresh and running, to occupy themselves (yeah, in some unionized facilities they have a kind of plan to interview, say X% and number of "minority" candidates each year, and since many times such candidates cannot be identified by names, people are just called for interview till numbers stay right), to cover the fact that BFF of the daughter of the double removed cousin of the NM got to have job after school.

In fact, double interview is one red flag about "false interview". They use this technique pretty often to show off to the world how much they "care" about their staff.

Read some professional HR message boards. After I did that, I got a strong impression that I will never shake a hand with any of these people. And I do not feel that much for management, either.

Something tells me you have never held a leadership position and especially have never hired anyone.

Sometimes it really does come down to two or more excellent candidates. In the real world there isn't a single awesome candidate for a single position and everyone else is ****.

Especially since the OP has 1.5 years of experience we can be assured that the pool of candidates is broad and deep which means there is a high likelihood of the hiring staff having to choose from several strong but similar candidates.

Not everything is a conspiracy and not everyone is out to get you.

KatieMI, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in ICU, LTACH, Internal Medicine. Has 7 years experience.

Something tells me you have never held a leadership position and especially have never hired anyone.

They got me in hiring commitee once and really tried to push me on clinical ladder. Over my cold body I'll ever do something like that. Sorry, leadership requires a bit of professional psychique deformation, as every other human occupation, and that one just not congruent with what I am.

After I was similarly "not chosen, although being excellent/very promicing/etc.", I once decided to figure out how the system works. I peeked around HR professional discussion boards, and bifriended a few of them. Overall impression was that many - not all but definitely many of them - would made very successful used car dealers before Blue Book became available online for free.

Edited by KatieMI

They got me in hiring commitee once and really tried to push me on clinical ladder. Over my cold body I'll ever do something like that. Sorry, leadership requires a bit of professional psychique deformation, as every other human occupation, and that one just not congruent with what I am.

After I was similarly "not chosen, although being excellent/very promicing/etc.", I once decided to figure out how the system works. I peeked around HR professional discussion boards, and bifriended a few of them. Overall impression was as above.

LOL... "The system"

If you honestly think there is "a system" you are naive. There is no universal method or system, HR is as disorganized as we are. Conspiracies should stay in TV, the real world is just not that organized nor malicious.

Most leadership I know are normal nurses trying to do the best they can with what they have in a difficult environment.

Been there,done that, ASN, RN

Has 33 years experience.

Two interviews is not that many. I had 5 interviews to get my dream job.

Certainly you would send a thank you note after each interview, no more contact would be required after you were turned down. I would never suck up with a food gift.

Keep searching, you'll get there.

A nice, hand-written thank-you note should be sent to the hiring manager. That gesture is sufficient.

You know, you never know about these things. The hiring manager made have done you a big favor. You just don't know. If this position is truly your dream job, you might concentrate on WHY you didn't get the job.

Did you feel as though you had a good rapport with the hiring manager? If so, I would ask for feedback. It can't hurt.

This too shall pass. You will find that dream job!

It's unfortunate that you were not able to get your dream job but this could be an opportunity that might lead you to something better. So don't be too down and continue to enjoy what you do. :)

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

Well...

I really dislike when people are lying into my face. I understand that's what HR and management are living and breathing with and that nowadays lying became a socially acceptable and even expected behavior but it doesn't make it right.

Thank you note? Maybe. Goodies? H*** no. And I would really, really evaluate if I want ever work in place where people are lying to each other.

What? Who is lying? The OP didn't get the job. She's got only a year and a half of experience and they may have had more qualified applicants. This seems to be a little harsh.

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

Two interviews is not that many. I had 5 interviews to get my dream job.

Certainly you would send a thank you note after each interview, no more contact would be required after you were turned down. I would never suck up with a food gift.

Keep searching, you'll get there.

I went through 13 interviews for a job that ended up going to someone else. So did the three other candidates who didn't get the job.

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

Multiple opinions for the original poster to consider. Personally, I go with the positive viewpoint: I made it this far, I'll send a hand-written thank you for their time and let them know I'm interested in being considered for further openings.

I would not go so far as to send a box of cookies, but I would follow up with a thank you card, and email your interviewers once every 1-2 months with a quick "I am still interested, here are some professional things I am doing right now".

shibaowner, MSN, RN, NP

Has 1 years experience.

I have been a hiring manager. Sometimes we end up with 2 or 3 great candidates for a job. Then a hard choice has to be made. It is not a reflection on you. Rather, it shows you are a strong candidate to have made it that far.

A friend of mine made it all the way to the final round of interviews for a position and was rejected. A week later, he was hired, as the the person who got the offer rejected it.

I have also had this same experience when job hunting. IBeing in the top 2 candidates and not being selected.) Definitely follow up with thank you notes. And if you feel you had a strong rapport, then ask for honest feedback. Let them know you are still interested in future opportunities and touch base occasionally and continue to check for new openings there.

In the meantime, keep looking. When one door closes, another opens. Good luck!