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refusal of assignment

Nurses   (6,306 Views | 26 Replies)
by anurse4life anurse4life (New) New

anurse4life has 14 years experience and specializes in icu, cardiac, respiratory.

1,377 Profile Views; 9 Posts

I went in to work this morning i work 7-7. Only to find out that i had been "floated " to an area that works 5-5 and i have no expertise in. The assignment was to heavy for me and i did not have acceptable and knowledgable skills. Needless to say i refused the assignment and was sent home. I had never punched in. I am now awaiting me "meeting" with suporvisors to discuss my "punishment". Right now i am very frustrated, i thought that i worked in a field that had compassion and worked with humans, not in a coffee shop handing out lattes'. Has anyone else ever been in this position or am i out here floating all by myself?? thanks for listening

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BittyBabyGrower is a MSN, RN and specializes in NICU, PICU, educator.

1,823 Posts; 13,027 Profile Views

Did you call the nursing supervisor? If we are handed an unacceptable assignment we call the supervisor and then we write a little memo, copied several times, about the incident.

If you truly felt that it was unfair and you couldn't do this, then there shouldn't be a problem. But, make sure you write down everything.

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

11 Followers; 66 Articles; 13,952 Posts; 173,068 Profile Views

I once refused an assignment -- I worked on a heme/onc floor and was asked to float to MICU to do CHARGE. When I said I wouldn't do it because I had no ICU experience, I was told that "there's a great LPN there, and 3 very experienced agency RNs. Besides, I'm the nursing supervisor and it's my call." When I continued to refuse, she told me that I'd be fired if I didn't accept the assignment. I told her "I'd rather lose my job than my license," and she backed down.

My point, I guess, is that if you felt it was truly unsafe you're in the same position. your job or your license. You can always find another job if need be, but once you fix this attitude in your mind you may not have to. Good luck.

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anurse4life has 14 years experience and specializes in icu, cardiac, respiratory.

9 Posts; 1,377 Profile Views

yeah i called the supervisor she was the one that sent me home said it was my problem and that i could not refuse. Soooo then she called her supervisor who called me and i told her the same thing and then she called her supervisor who is supposedly the head boss and now i have a meeting today to decide my fate... by the way very large hospital as you can tell that has many supervisors but not enough nurses to work the floors

Did you call the nursing supervisor? If we are handed an unacceptable assignment we call the supervisor and then we write a little memo, copied several times, about the incident.

If you truly felt that it was unfair and you couldn't do this, then there shouldn't be a problem. But, make sure you write down everything.

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4,177 Posts; 14,489 Profile Views

i can understand how they feel like if they back down on one every one will refuse assignments at will...however...the other posts are absolutely right--LICENSE IS MORE IMPORTANT THAN JOB...also if a patient suffered because you were not qualified you would be legally and morally responsible...just stand around and see all them supervisors rally around to stand up for you

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anurse4life has 14 years experience and specializes in icu, cardiac, respiratory.

9 Posts; 1,377 Profile Views

i am new here and still learning how to post and reply but wanted to thank everyone for your answers and support its nice to hear from others when you feel like you are the only boat in the ocean

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437 Posts; 4,974 Profile Views

it happens all over doesn't it?! When will the scheduling people get it?! A nurse is a nurse is anurse... just isn't true!! There are so many areas of expertise and nuances within those areas to be aware of!!!

You did a very difficult but responsible thing! You were honest about your skills sets and I hope that they realize that you may have saved their fannies!!! Licensure is a precious thing!! I'm proud of you for being a patient advocate, a nurse with principles, and a quality/risk manager! MULTI-TASKING TO THE MAX!!!

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56 Posts; 1,268 Profile Views

I must admit when I first read about your "assignment refusal" I wasn't sympathetic to you as I generally believe people are hired to work; not to refuse assignments. However, having read these posts I realize these wonderful nurses are absolutely right - your license is far more important than a job and you did the right thing.

A little perspective here that might illustrate how someone can change their mind: I come from a management background (15 years - non-medical) and have a tendency (out of habit) to take the side of the businesses. But, after considering the license and legal side I quickly changed my mind. After all, we dont' expect an attorney to do thigns that could get them disbared or worse - so why ask a nurse to do basically the same thing? It's unethical and unprofessional.

So - I tend to think if you can get an audience with the right person they will understand the legal and license angle more so than others. After all, if you're out of your area of expertise in a lot of businesses you can redo to work until you get it right. You might upset some customers a long the way but it's of minimal consequence. In the medical profession we don't have that luxury. One bad move and someone could lose their life - a whole different ball game - as it were.

Good luck.

And thanks for starting this thread - it made me think and actually made me more sensitive to the whole issue.

Michael

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RN4NICU has 15 years experience as a LPN, LVN.

1,711 Posts; 7,088 Profile Views

I think I would take a copy of my state's nurse practice act to this little meeting. You have the legal and ethical responsibility to your patients to put their safety before management's whims.

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615 Posts; 5,020 Profile Views

I must admit when I first read about your "assignment refusal" I wasn't sympathetic to you as I generally believe people are hired to work; not to refuse assignments. However, having read these posts I realize these wonderful nurses are absolutely right - your license is far more important than a job and you did the right thing.

A little perspective here that might illustrate how someone can change their mind: I come from a management background (15 years - non-medical) and have a tendency (out of habit) to take the side of the businesses. But, after considering the license and legal side I quickly changed my mind. After all, we dont' expect an attorney to do thigns that could get them disbared or worse - so why ask a nurse to do basically the same thing? It's unethical and unprofessional.

So - I tend to think if you can get an audience with the right person they will understand the legal and license angle more so than others. After all, if you're out of your area of expertise in a lot of businesses you can redo to work until you get it right. You might upset some customers a long the way but it's of minimal consequence. In the medical profession we don't have that luxury. One bad move and someone could lose their life - a whole different ball game - as it were.

Good luck.

And thanks for starting this thread - it made me think and actually made me more sensitive to the whole issue.

Michael

"people are hired to work; not to refuse assignments."

It's a matter of PATIENT SAFETY.

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CSLee3 has 10 years experience and specializes in Instructor/ER/Sports Med.

229 Posts; 4,620 Profile Views

Check your states practice act. Most states, like Texas, have a "Safe Harbor" claus that a nurse can involke for her or patient safety reasons. Does require a lot of documentation.....so start jotting down all facts if you haven't already.

Good Luck with the meeting........C

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56 Posts; 1,268 Profile Views

"people are hired to work; not to refuse assignments."

It's a matter of PATIENT SAFETY.

no arguement here.

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