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Rectal Medication

Hello all,

I was wondering how often rectal medication is administered in the ICU vs. LTC. Are there specific times when it should be avoided? When is it most advantageous to do this instead of IV?

Thanks!

I have worked both of these environments. In ICU we usually gave suppository med when the pt was not able to take a PO. For instance, Tylenol for an elevated temp can be given suppository when a pt has an ETT in place. I would say I gave more suppositories in ICU than I did in LTC. The med I gave mostly in LTC was a compazine suppository for vomiting. Most LTC pts do not have IV access and when they are vomiting a PO med is not going to help them, therefore a suppository is more appropriate. Rectal procedures in LTC are not looked upon favorably by inspectors, so rectal meds are limited. Another medication that was given rarely by suppository was Theodur, when a pt was not able to take it orally. I don't know if this is still available.

I work LTC so I can speak from that side. I'm usually giving suppository stool softeners if oral didn't work. Occasionally a Gravol if they can't keep anything from nausea and rarely Tylenol and that was mostly with a palliative pt with high fever.

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

Smells like homework to me..
OP has other similar posts for a 'project'.

roser13, ASN, RN

Specializes in Med/Surg, Ortho, ASC.

OP, just remember that any homework answers that you do in an online forum cannot be counted as actual research. Or even real answers, to be honest. You do not know for a fact that someone who is willing to feed you answers is actually a nurse. Or even if he/she is a nurse, he/she might not have any real experience in the area you're asking about.

I have seen folks give some outrageous answers to nursing students, just to yank their chains and (I guess) encourage them to do their own research.

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

To roser13 - Amen for your answer! To illustrate your point - earlier, I was reading a post that asked something about what other jobs nurses had before they went for nursing. I had this urge to answer "a truck stop junkie'. :cheeky: Oh, I so wanted to answer that....

No Stars In My Eyes

Specializes in Med nurse in med-surg., float, HH, and PDN.

amoLucia,

I am 'doing a project' about truck-stop-junkies and would like to interview you about the efficacy of hand-washing habits of truck-drivers.

Can you include percentages in your answer, please? :cheeky:

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

No Stars - the drivers must be doing OK because I never got sick when dating.:roflmao:

Rectal medication should specifically be avoided if the patient does not have a rectum.

No Stars In My Eyes

Specializes in Med nurse in med-surg., float, HH, and PDN.

Rectal medication should specifically be avoided if the patient does not have a rectum.

EXCELLENT point, enuf_already! I hope the students are taking note!

KelRN215, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pedi.

Hello all,

I was wondering how often rectal medication is administered in the ICU vs. LTC. Are there specific times when it should be avoided? When is it most advantageous to do this instead of IV?

Thanks!

What are some common meds that you give rectally? Have you ever seen a Fleets Enema in IV form? Or Dulcolax?

NanaPoo

Specializes in School Nursing, Hospice,Med-Surg.

If patient is sans rectum, I've found it is nice to rub that suppository down between your palms into a fine, creamy moisturizer and apply to the patient's dry skin. The patient will get a nice, moist skin effect AND the medicating effect of the suppository. It's a twofer!

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

EastsideNurse - you are joking, oui??? You do sound very authoritative.

NanaPoo

Specializes in School Nursing, Hospice,Med-Surg.

Just trying to help our OP out with one of his/her many homework assignments!

Yes, I'm joking :) I haven't actually tried that but...

amoLucia

Specializes in LTC.

Just trying to help our OP out with one of his/her many homework assignments!

Yes, I'm joking :) I haven't actually tried that but...

I've learned some very interesting things here. I'm thinking - could there be some kind of emollient/lubricant thing in the supp that has some

heretofore unknown second use. One the FDA hasn't yet approved? And there are meds that are transdermally used.

You had me going ...

No Stars In My Eyes

Specializes in Med nurse in med-surg., float, HH, and PDN.

I've learned some very interesting things here. I'm thinking - could there be some kind of emollient/lubricant thing in the supp that has some

heretofore unknown second use. One the FDA hasn't yet approved? And there are meds that are transdermally used.

You had me going ...

Like Glycerin Suppositories as facial moisturizers? It'd be cheaper than buying some high dollar products. And, no, I haven't tried it; but as long as it was unopened I might be convinced to try it. After all, models used to use Prep H cream to diminish under-eye wrinkles. (Tried that; didn't like it.)

Suppositories are the only option for patients who are entirely rectums and not much else.

KelRN215, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pedi.

If patient is sans rectum, I've found it is nice to rub that suppository down between your palms into a fine, creamy moisturizer and apply to the patient's dry skin. The patient will get a nice, moist skin effect AND the medicating effect of the suppository. It's a twofer!

Bwahahahahaha that's the greatest thing I've read all day.

No Stars In My Eyes

Specializes in Med nurse in med-surg., float, HH, and PDN.

Suppositories are the only option for patients who are entirely rectums and not much else.

Got THAT right! :roflmao:

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