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Racism in the workplace

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You are reading page 3 of Racism in the workplace. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

I know exactly what you're saying. If my mother tells a story that has to do with any person besides your standard white, straight male/female, she will always make it a point in her story to say, "This black guy at work" or "You know Sheila, the lady who sits next to me, well she's a lesbian, but she's the nicest person you'll ever meet......" and then continue with her story. And I always want to shake her and say, "What on earth does that have to do with the story???" I know she doesn't mean anything by it and I would NEVER consider my mother racist or prejudice against anyone, but like multi said, it's not possible to escape the effects that generation upon generation has left on society. The best we can do is provide good examples through our words and actions and to help educate those who make racist comments.

I wouldn't be offended by this. Although some people might cringe at it.

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Bravo! Thank you! You are one of few, but I appreciate people like you all the time.

I know some people are set in their ways, and there are shades of racism, and no one wants to be PC, blah, blah, blah. But c'mon, comments like the n-word and endowment have NO place in the workplace.

i agree with you 100%

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:kiss i hope one day racism will be a thing of the past,too much chaos and war going around already.i hope peace will reign someday.GIVE PEACE A CHANCE.

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Someone here mentioned that nobody wants to be PC. I do. I am one to defend being PC. Yes I am. It does get tiresome always being so careful. But since when is it wrong or unnecessary to make sure you aren't hurting those different than yourself? It's easy to snicker at things considered PC when you aren't the one who is hurt. Everytime I've heard people complain about a particular 'PC' thing, I've tried to place myself in the shoes of the subject, and I find a light bulb goes off in my head. I hope what I am trying to describe makes sense.

I find being PC to be a practice of unlearning the subtle racism that is inherant in our lives and language. Tiresome sometimes, but necessary.

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What does anyone think about hiring prejudice, it's not only with race, there are male nurses that don't get hired in OB just for being males, there are people that don't get jobs for being black, or being mexican, or being fat or being an ADN for that matter, Prejudice is everywhere, and it's just one more thing to add on top of everything in a profession where everyone needs to be working together!!!

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Yes, I have heard some stuff also. It is not the obvious stuff, but like the little things, when they talk about the 'black patient' or the 'black coworker of their husbands'. That stuff bothers me. I never hear them say 'white patient'.

In all fairness, I have heard black people (co-workers and pts/family) describe someone as "that white nurse" or "he was a white guy". I work in an almost 50/50 white/black environment and honestly.....I think it's just a matter of description. Like calling someone "the blonde lady".

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Oh, and another side note........ I live in Mississippi....the most picked on state re: racism.

I never...ok....NEVER.... hear the 'N' word in the workplace. Not among co-workers, pts, family...anyone.

I have been back home in Miss. (from "up north") for a year and I have maybe heard the 'N' word twice. From old people.

I have had a black co-worker call me a cracker-a$$...(in jest).... and I laughed.

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I used to work with a (White) nurse who was not only openly racist towards Blacks and Hispanics, but she seemed to hate everybody who was not middle-class and WASP. She made comments all the time about "white trash", "junkie low-life" and she was borderline abusive to some of the elderly with dementia. She was so confident that she had a right to treat people any way she wanted that she bragged about it. Basically she was a bully who went after anyone she perceived as powerless. I got in her face after I caught her telling a little old lady to "shut up" and that she was disturbing the other patients with her constant moaning. I knew that the lady was mourning because she got the news while in the hospital that her adult daughter died of cancer. For my confrontational attitude, I got "angry nurse" label. What really upsets me is that she was allowed to retire a couple of years later at her leisure. Apparently everyone else gave her a pass. It happens.

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sadly, for as much racism there is, apathy is just as pervasive.

leslie

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"I have a dream that one day this nation will rise up and live out the true meaning of its creed; 'We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal.'" "I have a dream that my four children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin, but by the content of their character. " - Dr. M L King Jr

I was born 13 years after this event. I have to believe in some way we are moving closer towards this dream then further away from it. I whole heartily believe in Dr Kings dream and I try to teach my children the principals it embodies.

It must start with every new generation and I hope some day racisms will be a long forgotten era of the past.

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In all fairness, I have heard black people (co-workers and pts/family) describe someone as "that white nurse" or "he was a white guy". I work in an almost 50/50 white/black environment and honestly.....I think it's just a matter of description. Like calling someone "the blonde lady".

Yes, Leah. You're right. Saying 'the black patient' in of of itself is not a bad thing. I guess if it was said in an indignant or derisive tone, someone might read more into it.

And even if it's not said in a bad tone, some people might do a double take, only because we are(some black folks, not all) kind of used to being referred in a bad light, so it's almost like we're trying to detect 'it' or look out for it. I don't know how else to explain it. It's a sensitive issue but I don't get personally don't get offended by it.

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Yes, Leah. You're right. Saying 'the black patient' in of of itself is not a bad thing.

I would be more likely to distinguish my "white patient" because the majority of my patients are black.

But as far as nurses calling their pt's white and black.... that's rarely done. Even in report, I don't say "a 44 y/o black male"....it's just "a 44 y/o male"

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