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Quitting my 1st RN job

Nurses   (10,368 Views 89 Comments)
by Nori.Giselle Nori.Giselle (Member) Member

Nori.Giselle has 4 years experience and specializes in TICU.

2,020 Profile Views; 72 Posts

I current work in the TICU. I really want to work in the PICU; however, they didn't haven't any openings when I was applying. I've always wanted to work Peds!! I don't hate my job. Its ok. The teamwork is great and my coworkers are always there if I have questions. I want some advice on how long I should stay where I'm at before I apply. I will say while I'm here I will learn everything I can (crrt, ecmo, recovering liver, lungs, kidney and pancreas transplants) so that when I do apply I'll at least be marketable! P.S. I might possibly stay PRN whenever I do decide to leave. How long should I wait? TIA for the advice!

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

11 Followers; 66 Articles; 13,948 Posts; 171,891 Profile Views

First, what is a TICU? One has to be careful about using acronyms on an international forum like this one because what seems obvious to you may not be decipherable to someone else.

In general, it takes approximately two years for a new nurse to become competent, assuming the nurse stays in one position and doesn't muddy the waters by job hopping. The TICU (whatever that is) seems to have some complex systems and protocols to learn -- kudos for landing such an interesting job. It does mean, however, that two years is probably a low end estimate for you to become competent.

It's great that you don't "hate the job", but with so much to learn, it could be a job that you love while you're learning. Happiness isn't in having what you want; it's in wanting what you have.

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Nori.Giselle has 4 years experience and specializes in TICU.

72 Posts; 2,020 Profile Views

First, what is a TICU? One has to be careful about using acronyms on an international forum like this one because what seems obvious to you may not be decipherable to someone else.

In general, it takes approximately two years for a new nurse to become competent, assuming the nurse stays in one position and doesn't muddy the waters by job hopping. The TICU (whatever that is) seems to have some complex systems and protocols to learn -- kudos for landing such an interesting job. It does mean, however, that two years is probably a low end estimate for you to become competent.

It's great that you don't "hate the job", but with so much to learn, it could be a job that you love while you're learning. Happiness isn't in having what you want; it's in wanting what you have.

TICU is The Transplant ICU. I can have all of these competencies by the end of my first 1 yr.

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Ruby Vee has 40 years experience as a BSN and specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching.

11 Followers; 66 Articles; 13,948 Posts; 171,891 Profile Views

TICU is The Transplant ICU. I can have all of these competencies by the end of my first 1 yr.

Just because you have achieved all of the competencies does not mean you are actually competent. Being truly competent takes time, experience and hard work. It takes about two years.

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RNperdiem has 14 years experience as a RN.

1 Follower; 4,212 Posts; 29,560 Profile Views

Are you new to nursing in the ICU? If you work in transplant, chances are your hospital has a PICU, and internal candidates are at an advantage.

How long you wait depends on how long it takes you to really feel competent. If you are new to ICU, it might be a long time before anyone trains you for ECMO ( a very desirable skill in PICU).

Don't underestimate the satisfaction of great teamwork and coworkers. You have a good thing going.

Sometimes I read postings here of nurses who find their joy at getting into a hard-to-break-into specialty ruined by things like poor management, low morale, lack of teamwork and unwelcoming nurses.

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Nori.Giselle has 4 years experience and specializes in TICU.

72 Posts; 2,020 Profile Views

Just because you have achieved all of the competencies does not mean you are actually competent. Being truly competent takes time, experience and hard work. It takes about two years.

Everyone is different. Just because it takes one person 2 years doesn't mean it will take the next nurse 2 years as well.

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Nori.Giselle has 4 years experience and specializes in TICU.

72 Posts; 2,020 Profile Views

Are you new to nursing in the ICU? If you work in transplant, chances are your hospital has a PICU, and internal candidates are at an advantage.

How long you wait depends on how long it takes you to really feel competent. If you are new to ICU, it might be a long time before anyone trains you for ECMO ( a very desirable skill in PICU).

Don't underestimate the satisfaction of great teamwork and coworkers. You have a good thing going.

Sometimes I read postings here of nurses who find their joy at getting into a hard-to-break-into specialty ruined by things like poor management, low morale, lack of teamwork and unwelcoming nurses.

This is my first ICU job. I'm not new to nursing. I was a LPN (worked med surg and home health), Medical assistant, CNA before becoming a RN. The PICU at our hospital doesn't take really sick kids. They don't do ECMO on kids. If they get that sick then they are transferred to a Children's hospital. I want to work at the Children's hospital.

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Been there,done that has 33 years experience as a ASN, RN.

4 Followers; 6,210 Posts; 69,357 Profile Views

Apply where? An internal transfer usually requires 6 months in your current position.

To apply to outside facilities , you would need at least one year of experience at your current position. Otherwise, the new facility would view you as a job hopper.

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1 Article; 630 Posts; 15,112 Profile Views

When I read TICU I thought that it was Trauma ICU as it is my hospital. The transplant patients go to SICU which is Surgical ICU where I am.

I guess it is a good idea to type it all out!!

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sjalv has 1 years experience and specializes in CVICU.

897 Posts; 12,162 Profile Views

Disclaimer: I'm speaking as a nurse who started in an adult CVICU, and that's still where I am. Obviously our hospitals' orientation programs and environments differ, as we don't even do transplants at my hospital and I'm guessing y'all don't do open heart surgeries in the transplant ICU :shy: But, I know that even though I didn't die of anxiety going to work after being there for a year, I know SO much more now just 6 months later than I did then. And I am sure in June, when I will have been there for 2 years, I'll look back and realize I've learned even more since then.

However, if you are currently working with adults, but you want to do peds, it's gonna be a big transition regardless if you have 1 year or 2 years of experience, given that the pathophysiologies you'll be dealing with differ so much between the two population types. If PICU is your ultimate goal, and you are not bound by a contract, I don't think you will be doing yourself a big disservice by transferring after a year. If you were wanting to switch from one adult ICU to another, I would definitely recommend staying the 2 years as the skillset you acquire will more than likely transfer without issue. I can't say the same for going from an adult ICU to a pediatric ICU, regardless of the type.

Perhaps someone who has worked both can chime in on the benefits of 1 year vs 2 years.

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Amethya has 5 years experience and specializes in Cardiology, School Nursing, General.

1,806 Posts; 12,467 Profile Views

#1 rule I learned since I got my first job at 19. NEVER, EVER LEAVE A JOB BEFORE GETTING ANOTHER ONE. Trust me on this, because you will be out a job for a while until you find one and that can be MONTHS. Leave a 2 week notice after you find one, then once you start, you will still get paid and not worry about bills.

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1 Article; 630 Posts; 15,112 Profile Views

When I read TICU I thought that it was Trauma ICU as it is my hospital. The transplant patients go to SICU which is Surgical ICU where I am.

I guess it is a good idea to type it all out!!

I don't mean that I work in SICU I mean that Transplant patients go to SICU where I work!!

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