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Pt abandonment

Nurses   (2,850 Views | 16 Replies)
by RN92 RN92 Member

4,078 Profile Views; 265 Posts

I work in the ER. One night, this nurse got mad and blew her lid because she was staying busy and some of the other nurses were behind the desk talking. We usually help each other out, but we didnt know she needed any help. When she finished her temper tantrum - she left without telling any one. No one was watching her pts. It wasnt until the end of the shift that we noticed she wasnt there. Anyway, she was fired. She challenged her termination and WON!! I thought patient abandonment and neglect was a major NO-NO!! especially in an ER. I dont know why she didnt lose her license, much less, lose her job!!

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NurseyBaby'05 is a BSN, RN and specializes in Neuro/Med-Surg/Oncology.

1,110 Posts; 12,993 Profile Views

WHAT?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!?!Other than that, I am speechless.

I know I'm not a nurse yet, but that issue in particular with reporting off has been stressed profusely from Day 1.

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587 Posts; 7,136 Profile Views

I felt like walking off the job tonite -- I swear half the staff that was actually working felt that way.

Would I have done so? No way. You stay until the end of your shift, sign over your patients and provide your notice if you cannot bear being at your workplace any longer (can you guess where I am???)

ED work is too critical and too scary to abandon patients. Folks in need just do not deserve that. Leave if you must, but at least tell the charge nurse so that coverage is provided.

That nurse needs to grow up!!! :angryfire

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266 Posts; 5,178 Profile Views

I dont get how if she was so very busy the other ones had time to sit around. They couldnt find anything to do????? She should never have walked off, but i would have been a bit ticked if i was working and everyone else had time to sit and chat.

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Havin' A Party! has 10 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in ICU, CM, Geriatrics, Management.

2,721 Posts; 15,678 Profile Views

... dont know why she didnt lose her license, much less, lose her job!!

Any way to determine management's rationale for this?

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hoolahan is a ASN, RN and specializes in Home Health.

1 Article; 1,721 Posts; 23,417 Profile Views

She was definitely wrong to walk out and not give report, and should have been fired.

However, the only reason you could have not known if she was busy or needed help was because no one asked. In a unit where there is good team work, no one sits unless everyone can sit, or at least ask everyone if you can do anything for them before you take 5.

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68 Posts; 1,973 Profile Views

I dont know why she didnt lose her license, much less, lose her job!!

She didn't lose her license because no-one reported her

to the state board.

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RN4NICU has 15 years experience as a LPN, LVN.

1,711 Posts; 7,094 Profile Views

She was definitely wrong to walk out and not give report, and should have been fired.

However, the only reason you could have not known if she was busy or needed help was because no one asked. In a unit where there is good team work, no one sits unless everyone can sit, or at least ask everyone if you can do anything for them before you take 5.

I agree, hoolahan. When a bunch of us are sitting around talking (rare, but it happens) we notice who is not there and offer to pitch in - as we hope when we are running our legs off that our co-workers will pitch in and help us as well.

Yet even on my worst shift I would never just walk out without giving report - I might think long and hard about never coming back, but I would finish my shift.

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boggle is a ASN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg.

393 Posts; 6,059 Profile Views

I agree with what has been posted. Teamwork is all about watching out for each other. But I know sometimes we just get wrapped up in ourselves and don't notice the needs of other nurses,without intending to be hurtful. (In some workplaces, your co workers just don't care.)

Either way, you have to develop a vocabulary of "Hey, I need help" phrases, and use them before you reach the boiling point and walk off the job or the like. There is no weakness in asking for help, even though the nursing culture (and our bosses) tells us we should be able to do it all.

If you are in a toxic situation where no one helps, or gives you a bad time about asking, .. move. If help is there, but you don't ask for it, you are part of the problem.

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nursemike has 12 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in Rodeo Nursing (Neuro).

1 Article; 2,354 Posts; 15,145 Profile Views

I agree with what has been posted. Teamwork is all about watching out for each other. But I know sometimes we just get wrapped up in ourselves and don't notice the needs of other nurses,without intending to be hurtful. (In some workplaces, your co workers just don't care.)

Either way, you have to develop a vocabulary of "Hey, I need help" phrases, and use them before you reach the boiling point and walk off the job or the like. There is no weakness in asking for help, even though the nursing culture (and our bosses) tells us we should be able to do it all.

If you are in a toxic situation where no one helps, or gives you a bad time about asking, .. move. If help is there, but you don't ask for it, you are part of the problem.

I totally agree, but would just add that the fact that someone else isn't busy doesn't mean I need help. I've had lots of nights where I had plenty to do, but no problem keeping up. I refuse to ask for help when I don't need help. Sometimes I'll accept it if it's offered, so we can all goof off together, but I'm not the Nurse Manager. It's not my job to make sure everyone is busy, or that the workload is always equal. If my buds have an easy night once in awhile, good for them.

This whole teamwork thing would be so much simpler if people would just grow up.

Er--I guess there have been times when I've had absolutely nothing to do and have requested assistance doing it. (Don't tell my NM). I try to maintain a distinction between being mature and getting old. A little silliness is okay in my book.

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652 Posts; 3,834 Profile Views

To leave before your shift is just wrong..especially without telling anyone!!! geez...if you need help open your mouth and ask for it..don't wait until you get to the 'blow your top' stage..I don't LIKE asking for help myself..most people don't..but to provide quality care sometimes we have to..I'm lucky to work with some great folks..we all chip in if one person is struggling..it's only right...and guess what? the next time it may be YOU in a tight...ya get what ya give :)

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boggle is a ASN, RN and specializes in Med-Surg.

393 Posts; 6,059 Profile Views

:chuckle Nurse mike, growing up doesn't mean you can't be silly. Silly is what gets you through the tough days.

I appreciated your comments.

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