Jump to content

PLEASE HELP! I AM STRESSED TO THE MAX!! How long do Prerequisites last?

should I give up? I really want to be a Nurse Anesthetist!

  1. 1. should I give up? I really want to be a Nurse Anesthetist!

    • Yes
    • No
    • Absolutely NOT
    • 0
      YES! You'll be too old by the time you finish the Nurse anesthetist program!
    • Find another major

7 members have participated

I wanted to know how long prerequisites for nursing school lasts. Do they expire EXACTLY at the 5 year mark? Or do some nursing schools give you leeway? I took chemistry back in spring of 2013. I had stopped going to school due to child care reasons. I took chemistry TWICE!! BARELY passing. I got a C+. So, summer of 2016 I finally told myself that it was time for me to go back to school to better myself so my child and I could have a good life. So now it's Fall 2016 and I am literally failing AP1( a C- is failing because NO nursing school will accept that). It is so hard I don't know what to do. I've been studying but I guess not good enough. For my first exam I focused more on lab and not lecture part. For my second exam I focused more on lecture and not lab. My average is a C- and I have ONE Exam left. I doubt that I can raise that to a B with having only one exam left. Even if I got an A on the last exam. I'm so frustrated! I know that I'm gonna have to take AP1 again. I'm honestly really worried about having to take chem over. It expires I'm guessing spring '18. Worse case scenario, if I have to AP1 over again which would be spring '17 I would have to take AP2 in the fall '17 and then micro in spring of '18(when my chemistry expires I'm guessing) would nursing school not accept me for fall of 2018?

This is going to get moved to the student forum I'm assuming.

I'm laughing at your poll choices...how do we know how old you are?? I will be 37 when I graduate nursing school.

Only the school you are applying to can tell you when prerequisites expire. This is highly dependent on the school! There is someone over in the student forum who took all her prereqs in 2007 I think and she says her school doesn't care.

A&P is HARD. So is chemistry. I got into nursing school with a C in A&P 1 ( did get a B in 2nd semester) and a C+ in Organic Chemistry. What is your GPA? What saved me is by killing the entrance exam (HESI). I'm doing much better in nursing school, all As and Bs so far. For any C- I'm sure you will have to retake.

You can do this, you just have to find out what you are doing wrong in regards to studying. A&P is mostly about memorizing, especially the "A" part. Have you meet with the instructors or TAs? Other classmates to study with?

Haha Oh gosh! I'm sorry. I'm 24 I'll be 25 New Year's Day. My class is full of moms who work and just don't have time. And my professor is always out the door 5 minutes before class ends. I feel that she doesn't care to stay after class especially bc I have a night class mondays 5:00pm- 6:25pm(lecture) then lab 6:30-9:25. On Wednesdays it's 5:00-6:25. That's the only class I'm taking because they only classes I need are AP1, AP2, and Microbiology. My GPA is a 2.6 . The only school closest to me that will take chem past the 5 year mark is Norwalk community college.(I'm from Connecticut)

Yeah you are going to have to replace those Cs. A 2.6 likely doesn't even meet the minimum GPA requirements to apply to nursing school.

You aren't too old if this is really what you want to do.

TheCommuter, BSN, RN

Specializes in Case mgmt., rehab, (CRRN), LTC & psych.

This is going to get moved to the student forum I'm assuming.
Yep...moved to the Pre-Nursing Student forum for more replies.

HouTx, BSN, MSN, EdD

Specializes in Critical Care, Education.

PPs are offering great information and advice. Nursing is a health science profession. The success of our nursing practice depends upon our ability to apply some fairly complex concepts. In order to get there, we first have to achieve a proficiency in the basic sciences, especially A & P. Without that, there is no hope of making it through the clinical portion of the cumulative nursing curriculum. Based on your comments, it seems as though you already understand this. The rationale behind course expiration is twofold: 1) over time, your recollection of the content will fade if you haven't used it, and 2) knowledge is continually changing (especially for A & P).

But I just wanted to add that CRNA is THE MOST "sciencey" nursing specialty... getting there requires a very high level of mastery, stellar GPA & Critical Care nursing experience. If you're already having difficulty with the basics, maybe you should consider another end goal. There are other practice areas that may be more achievable.

It depends on your school entirely. Most schools use the 5 year mark, some 10. My school doesn't care how long ago you took it, but they expect you to be able to recall the information necessary to be successful.

So, ask your prospective school(s).

Haha Oh gosh! I'm sorry. I'm 24 I'll be 25 New Year's Day. My class is full of moms who work and just don't have time. And my professor is always out the door 5 minutes before class ends. I feel that she doesn't care to stay after class especially bc I have a night class mondays 5:00pm- 6:25pm(lecture) then lab 6:30-9:25. On Wednesdays it's 5:00-6:25. That's the only class I'm taking because they only classes I need are AP1, AP2, and Microbiology. My GPA is a 2.6 . The only school closest to me that will take chem past the 5 year mark is Norwalk community college.(I'm from Connecticut)

Honestly, I'd be more worried about your GPA being competitive at this point.

There is no expiration date for those classes at the CC I plan on attending for nursing. I made all A's in the two A&P classes I took back in 2005/2006 so I am not going to take those again since I made such good grades. Now I will start studying A&P again, but through a free online course that is offered.

You're not even an RN yet, much less even close to passing your BSN and NCLEX and getting the several (maybe many) years of experience you'll need to be even mildly competitive for CRNA school admission. Horse before the cart, here. This is a long, long process. "Really, really wanting" it isn't gonna work; hope is not a plan. You may have to take those courses over again and fergawdsakes, ace them.

At the program I'm in you'd be on thin ice. You can only retake 2 science classes. You'd have zero wiggle room and really need to step it up to be competitive.

Well I only need a 2.7 to get in to the nursing program.

Honestly, I'd be more worried about your GPA being competitive at this point.

Well I only need a 2.7 to get into the program so I'm not that far behind. And yeah I do want to get higher gpathats why I'm just gonna take it over

Well I only need a 2.7 to get into the program so I'm not that far behind. And yeah I do want to get higher gpathats why I'm just gonna take it over

That's what my school requires as well, but when I went to the open house it was put out that students with gpas under 3.0s are rarely accepted. If I were in your shoes I would retake chem & a&p. I know it's time consuming, but if you applied with a low gpa and didn't get accepted then you would still have to retake them in the future to boost your gpa. I voted not to give up because if you really work for it you could bring that gpa up in no time and get accepted. Good luck!!!

PPs are offering great information and advice. Nursing is a health science profession. The success of our nursing practice depends upon our ability to apply some fairly complex concepts. In order to get there, we first have to achieve a proficiency in the basic sciences, especially A & P. Without that, there is no hope of making it through the clinical portion of the cumulative nursing curriculum. Based on your comments, it seems as though you already understand this. The rationale behind course expiration is twofold: 1) over time, your recollection of the content will fade if you haven't used it, and 2) knowledge is continually changing (especially for A & P).

But I just wanted to add that CRNA is THE MOST "sciencey" nursing specialty... getting there requires a very high level of mastery, stellar GPA & Critical Care nursing experience. If you're already having difficulty with the basics, maybe you should consider another end goal. There are other practice areas that may be more achievable.

thanks for the advice. But nursing is something I really want to have as my career. I'll just take the course over and try harder.

ChristiHamm8, CNA

Specializes in Family Clinic.

You really need to talk to your advisor or an advisor in the program on what their requirements are. Our school only lets you retake a prerequisite science class once and you have to maintain a C in those classes after that you are no longer eligible. 2.8 GPA is a minimum but you better have a seriously good looking resume/application packet or you won't even be looked at. I wish you the best of luck!

Right 2.7 is the minimum. Remember that there are only so many seats and you're competing with students who have well over a 3.0. I don't think anyone in my cohort has less than a 3.0.

Well I only need a 2.7 to get into the program so I'm not that far behind. And yeah I do want to get higher gpathats why I'm just gonna take it over

Many schools don't allow you to retake classes - or if you do, your second grade isn't taken into account at all. I went to college at 18 and got a C in English Comp - and that's all she wrote.

That said, the minimum GPA for my program is a 2.5. The average GPA of students that make it into the program is 3.5. Something to consider.

You should also consider that the grades you're making right now will absolutely impact your ability to get into an advanced practice program.

m1lkofamnesia

Specializes in ICU.

"You should also consider that the grades you're making right now will absolutely impact your ability to get into an advanced practice program."

ItsThatJenGirl is absolutely right. Rather than getting the minimum GPA to get into a nursing program, really try to get that GPA up. Once it's low, it's hard to raise it. IF, in the future, you were granted an interview at a CRNA school they WILL ask why you got a C in class. Most CRNA schools want about a 3.5 or higher, and may take lower if you do well on the GRE and/or have many years of ICU experience to make up for it.

Calculate what you would need on the final to get a B in the class. You should be able to do this if that is all you have left in the class (the final). If it's not achievable to get a B...perhaps retake the course. It sucks, but it will help you reach the end goal.

Just focus on getting into nursing school first, and get the best grades you possibly can. After that you'll have to do 1-2 years in ICU, get your CCRN, take the GRE, and start applying to CRNA schools. It takes time, but focus on the present for now! Baby steps.

Many schools don't allow you to retake classes - or if you do, your second grade isn't taken into account at all. I went to college at 18 and got a C in English Comp - and that's all she wrote.
Same here...I got a B 25 years ago (yes, that long ago) in an English class and I recently petitioned for that college to allow me to retake it so I could get an A and improve my GPA and they said "no!". I went into my pre-reqs with the knowledge that I had to get A's to be competitive. Fortunately I did well and I am now a nursing student. However, the schools that I applied to had a minimum GPA as well but most people that I know who applied had a 3.8 or higher. I met many people who were struggling who were really hoping to get in just because they want to be a nurse, but unfortunately that desire isn't good enough when you are trying to get into a competitive program. I recommend that people take their sciences pre-reqs slowly and get the A instead of trying to do too much at once.
×

By using the site you agree to our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies.

OK