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Planning to move to Texas

Nurses   (502 Views | 8 Replies)
by justleishla justleishla (New) New

81 Profile Views; 2 Posts

Hello everyone !
I am currently a student about to go on my last semester of nursing school in Florida As well as a single mom and I wanted to ask a few questions about Any nurses who have gone through the process of moving to Texas.
I wanted to know what the process was like. Do I need a change of license since it is a new state?
If any of you live in Arlington or Fort Worth, what were the best hospitals/ women’s hospitals you would recommend to me?
I want to know these things ahead of time because I may be moving and starting my career over there as a new nurse rather than signing onto a two year contract over here.
I also need to know what the best plan of attack is for me and my son.

thank you in advance !

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Silverdragon102 has 32 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Medical and general practice now LTC.

8 Followers; 1 Article; 39,250 Posts; 145,683 Profile Views

If moving from one state to another to live you need to endorse your nursing license

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SarHat17 has 8 years experience as a ADN and specializes in CVRU, Intermediate.

10 Posts; 73 Profile Views

Try connecting with advisers in your nursing school? Or even in a nursing school in the area you are looking at? They could even help get you connected with resources in that area (housing, childcare, etc) that their students use, or even connect you with other students/new grads in the area.

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Jedrnurse has 25 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in school nurse.

1,631 Posts; 14,724 Profile Views

5 hours ago, Silverdragon102 said:

If moving from one state to another to live you need to endorse your nursing license

Could the OP just arrange to take the boards in TX instead?

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Silverdragon102 has 32 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Medical and general practice now LTC.

8 Followers; 1 Article; 39,250 Posts; 145,683 Profile Views

They could but a lot will depend on timing as well as the need to work before moving. Also with current pandemic the ease on finding a job

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JadedCPN has 13 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Pediatric Float, PICU, NICU.

1 Follower; 991 Posts; 8,597 Profile Views

9 hours ago, Jedrnurse said:

Could the OP just arrange to take the boards in TX instead?

If I remember properly (it’s been some years) it doesn’t matter where you physically take the test, but rather what state you mark down on your application.

I took the test in Kentucky because they had the soonest testing date, but I received an Ohio license because that’s the state I applied for.

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1 Follower; 2,388 Posts; 48,915 Profile Views

As to which state to apply for initial licensure in, she should apply in FL. As FL is now member state of the Nurse Licensure Compact (NLC) her license should grant multi-state privileges. When she relocates to TX, another NLC state, she will be allowed to work using her FL license while her TX license is being processed.

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Nurse SMS has 9 years experience as a MSN, RN and specializes in Critical Care; Cardiac; Professional Development.

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Most of the hospitals in this area have suspended their residencies until the COVID-19 threat has eased. Before you move to DFW there are a few things to know.

1. Its a HARD market for a new grad to break into, even if you went to school and did clinicals here. There are more new grads than there are acute care jobs for them. Don't move here until you are actually hired or you may find yourself without work or working somewhere you didn't want to, such as home health, LTACH, SNF etc.

2. DFW hospitals only hire new grads into internships/residencies. Few to none of them will hire a new grad without any nursing experience directly to the floor. Again, don't move here until you have a written job offer with salary agreement and firm start date.

3. Residencies are generally held to correspond with the month or two immediately after graduation takes place. That means they only happen two to three times a year. You need to be applying before you graduate. As an example, my hospital has posted positions both last month and now for residencies that start in the Summer. If you miss these openings, you have missed the DFW new grad boat.

4. ALL the DFW hospitals require you to sign a contract for one to three years if you accept a residency/internship position.

5. You are going to find it much easier to get hired into the specialty you want if you do so where you live now and then move to Dallas after a year to two years of experience. It's hard to get those coveted women's health positions, such as Mother/Baby, L&D, etc.

Good luck with your job search!

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Michelle Yin has 12 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU.

16 Posts; 61 Profile Views

On 4/6/2020 at 7:27 AM, Nurse SMS said:

Most of the hospitals in this area have suspended their residencies until the COVID-19 threat has eased. Before you move to DFW there are a few things to know.

1. It's a HARD market for a new grad to break into, even if you went to school and did clinicals here. There are more new grads than there are acute care jobs for them. Don't move here until you are actually hired or you may find yourself without work or working somewhere you didn't want to, such as home health, LTACH, SNF etc.

2. DFW hospitals only hire new grads into internships/residencies. Few to none of them will hire a new grad without any nursing experience directly to the floor. Again, don't move here until you have a written job offer with salary agreement and firm start date.

3. Residencies are generally held to correspond with the month or two immediately after graduation takes place. That means they only happen two to three times a year. You need to be applying before you graduate. As an example, my hospital has posted positions both last month and now for residencies that start in the Summer. If you miss these openings, you have missed the DFW new grad boat.

4. ALL the DFW hospitals require you to sign a contract for one to three years if you accept a residency/internship position.

5. You are going to find it much easier to get hired into the specialty you want if you do so where you live now and then move to Dallas after a year to two years of experience. It's hard to get those coveted women's health positions, such as Mother/Baby, L&D, etc.

Good luck with your job search!

Thank you for your great advise. I also plan to move to Dallas area at end of this year or maybe sooner than that. I am licensed in Texas already, have my BSN , also 8.5 years ICU work experience outside US, I wonder in Dallas area, would HRs in hospitals consider my experience as well? I am afraid if they don't , then will be much more harder for me to find a job there. I aware that Dallas area now already not in short nurses , job market there might be tough. Do you think my work experience out of US could have any help ? thank you so much. 

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