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PCU or ER as a new grad

Nurses   (887 Views | 14 Replies)
by sour sour (New) New

431 Profile Views; 5 Posts

 I got offered a position in both PCU and the ER as a new grad. "Feel lucky that you got options as a new grad."
Well no, not really. I'm lost. I've worked in my hospital for 12 years as a unit assistant and recently graduated the nursing program. I went through 3 interviews (Neuro, medical, surgical) and didn't land the jobs. We just went through a RIF (Reduction in force) and my unit aassistant job is getting cut. After HR learned I'm a new grad, I got an interview on a unit that a position hasn't even been posted (PCU). Prior to getting asked to come in for an interview, another hospital called me to ask if I'm still interested in working for their ER (trauma lvl 3). I accepted. 
After PCU's interview, they offered me a job as well. I love cardiac as much as I love emergency nursing. To be honest, I feel so much guilt if I decline the PCU Job. 
 

ER: Full-time, benefitted, 55 minute drive, grave yard
 

PCU: supplemental (full time in 6 months) 5 minute drive, grave yard. 
 

Each pays the same. 
How do I choose? I really want the ER, But I don't know if I can't live with the guilt of declining pcu after they went out of their way to open up a position for me. 😞

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Rionoir is a ADN, RN and specializes in Neuro ICU.

594 Posts; 3,336 Profile Views

If you want ER go ER.  They didn’t go that far out of their way for you if you have to wait six months for a full time job. 

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SaltineQueen specializes in School Nurse, past Med Surge.

1 Follower; 822 Posts; 6,194 Profile Views

Honestly, that 5-minute drive would be the deciding factor for me.  At a hospital you know and I assume like...

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ruby_jane has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ICU/community health/school nursing.

3 Followers; 2,655 Posts; 10,862 Profile Views

Full time in six months vs full time now? Hmm. 

I don't often disagree with SaltineQueen but that drive might be worth some security....

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5 Posts; 431 Profile Views

Thanks all for your feedback!

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7 Followers; 3,343 Posts; 23,289 Profile Views

Is that “full time in 6 months” part in writing? Does the 6 month countdown start on your first day of employment or your first day off orientation? Will the full time position be on the same unit or will you possibly be transferred? How long is orientation? Will you be full time during it? Is there a residency? 

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10 minutes ago, Wuzzie said:

Is that “full time in 6 months” part in writing? Does the 6 month countdown start on your first day of employment or your first day off orientation? Will the full time position be on the same unit or will you possibly be transferred? How long is orientation? Will you be full time during it? Is there a residency? 

It's not official. Every few months they post benefitted position with the "6 months pcu exp required" so the new grads apply to it. My timer starts day 1 of orientation. The full time will be on the same unit. Orientation is 12 weeks long. They've also been flexing staff a lot due to low patient census. I'm afraid I'll be flexed first after I'm off orientation due to being the lowest seniority. 

I know the staff here really well at my hospital. 

The other hospital (ER) Is a brand new place to me. I dont know their staff, policies, or their atmosphere. I just don't want to regret not taking either of the jobs. 

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11 hours ago, sour said:

I'm afraid I'll be flexed first after I'm off orientation due to being the lowest seniority.

If "supplemental" is a fancy term for PRN or Per Diem then you'll be flexed off first because you wont' be considered regular staff. I'm all for short commutes having done long ones but I'm also a big proponent of regular paychecks.

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llg has 43 years experience as a PhD, RN and specializes in Nursing Professional Development.

6 Followers; 13,247 Posts; 59,369 Profile Views

I'd probably take the gamble and take the PCU gamble -- but keep my eyes and ears open for a full time option close to home.   That long commute would be too much of a drive for me twice per day.   It would get old real quick -- and I would be looking for a new job soon.

So I would take the PCU job, but not feel much obligation to them because they aren't willing to offer you a full time job.   If something better comes along, take it with a clear conscience -- something better than spending 2 hours in the car commuting every day.

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12 Followers; 3,820 Posts; 28,821 Profile Views

Two not great choices. 

What are they proposing exactly for the PCU job? Specifically, are they going to orient you full-time for a length consistent with the needs of a new grad?

 

On 12/12/2019 at 5:15 AM, sour said:

... I don't know if I can't live with the guilt of declining pcu after they went out of their way to open up a position for me. 😞

You have to leave this mindset behind. You can't feel guilty for others' decisions, which is exactly what you're saying. They have not created a position for you, they've simply said "we aren't hiring you but feel free to hang around in case we need someone on any given day."

If they plan to put you into a serious orientation with all the regular trimmings and expectations, I would consider it. That would demonstrate that they are willing to invest something even though they don't have a FT position right this moment, which suggests at least some reasonable intent on their part.

So...what are they proposing for orientation?

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MaleICURN has 46 years experience as a BSN and specializes in Critical Care, PICU, OR.

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I would rather go to ANOTHER hospital.

Why? Remember, in YOUR hospital people remember your previous position, so even subconsciously they may treat you as "a unit assistant".

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3 hours ago, JKL33 said:

Two not great choices. 

What are they proposing exactly for the PCU job? Specifically, are they going to orient you full-time for a length consistent with the needs of a new grad?

 

You have to leave this mindset behind. You can't feel guilty for others' decisions, which is exactly what you're saying. They have not created a position for you, they've simply said "we aren't hiring you but feel free to hang around in case we need someone on any given day."

If they plan to put you into a serious orientation with all the regular trimmings and expectations, I would consider it. That would demonstrate that they are willing to invest something even though they don't have a FT position right this moment, which suggests at least some reasonable intent on their part.

So...what are they proposing for orientation?

The plan is to orient me for 12 weeks, working side by side with another nurse. I'd be working three 12's a week. Along with that, I'll be sent to classes for any certifications I need like cardiac monitoring for nurses, sheath pulls, LVAD. 

On 12/13/2019 at 3:45 AM, Wuzzie said:

If "supplemental" is a fancy term for PRN or Per Diem then you'll be flexed off first because you wont' be considered regular staff. I'm all for short commutes having done long ones but I'm also a big proponent of regular paychecks.

Supplemental is even worse than per diem. Per diem gets maxed on the pay scale. Supplemental you make whatever the lowest amount is on the scale. They post all new grad positions that way. 

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