Out of State New Grad Advice

Updated | Posted

new-grad-relocated-state.jpg.d246367135412d178accaa63a3424881.jpg

I'm in need of some advice from anyone who successfully relocated out of state following graduating from a BSN program. I will be graduating from my ABSN program in Houston, Texas in December of this year and relocating near Atlanta, Georgia soon after graduation. I plan on moving almost right away after the end of the program and taking the NCLEX in Georgia, or take it here at home and transfer, whatever is easier?!

 I'll be applying to residencies in Georgia that begin in the Spring of 2023. Has anyone relocated after graduation? How did you go about interviewing, touring hospitals, etc? Also, did you test in your home state and transfer or just test in the new state following program completion? Both states are compact states if that helps! 

NICU Guy, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 7 years experience. 4,066 Posts

I relocated after graduation, but only after a job offer. I got the job offer in late November and the start date was mid-January. I had time to endorse my license to the new state.

Most initial interviews was by phone, then I was offered to have an in-person interview. Most hospitals didn't care I was out of state as long as I could show up on day one of the job with a valid license in that state.

I tested in my home state, then endorsed to the state with the job offer.

kbrn2002, ADN, RN

Specializes in Geriatrics, Dialysis. Has 20 years experience. 3,621 Posts

As long as you already know for certain you will moving soon after graduation you have no need for a Texas license that you will never use. Why pay to license in Texas and then pay again to endorse to Georgia?  There's not only the cost of paying for licensing twice but the added time of waiting for the license by endorsement to be approved by Georgia.

When you register to sit the NCLEX you indicate what state you are applying to practice in no matter where you test so there's no reason not to apply directly to Georgia. It doesn't make a difference that you are physically taking the test in Texas or anywhere else for that matter. If the timing works and you have your ATT and are able to schedule at a testing location close to you before leaving Texas go ahead and take it there before you move. 

That way you will have your license ready when you get to Atlanta plus avoid the stress of moving while you are preparing for the NCLEX.  If it works with the timing of your planned move you can start applying to new grad positions in Atlanta before you even leave Texas. You will probably get at least a few opportunities to move beyond the online application and interview in person giving you options to explore when you get there. 

Thank you for your response. This is so helpful. I intend to start a residency in the Spring, following graduation in December. I really want to start working right away and having a semester off to wait for my license to transfer is not economically feasible right now.  I did not know that I did not physically have to be in Georgia to test for my license to apply to that state. I initially wanted to move right after graduation before the holiday but with studying for the NCLEX, it's best I stay put until I can pass my exam to avoid added stress. Thanks again! 

14 hours ago, NICU Guy said:

I relocated after graduation, but only after a job offer. I got the job offer in late November and the start date was mid-January. I had time to endorse my license to the new state.

Most initial interviews was by phone, then I was offered to have an in-person interview. Most hospitals didn't care I was out of state as long as I could show up on day one of the job with a valid license in that state.

I tested in my home state, then endorsed to the state with the job offer.

Thank you for responding. My plan is to move after graduation, after passing the NCLEX. I will be applying to residencies when the applications open in the Fall. I am set on moving to Georgia. I was not aware that I could take the NCLEX here in Texas and have it apply to Georgia. How did the interviews go in person? Were you able to shadow while you were there? 

2 hours ago, kbrn2002 said:

As long as you already know for certain you will moving soon after graduation you have no need for a Texas license that you will never use. Why pay to license in Texas and then pay again to endorse to Georgia?  There's not only the cost of paying for licensing twice but the added time of waiting for the license by endorsement to be approved by Georgia.

When you register to sit the NCLEX you indicate what state you are applying to practice in no matter where you test so there's no reason not to apply directly to Georgia. It doesn't make a difference that you are physically taking the test in Texas or anywhere else for that matter. If the timing works and you have your ATT and are able to schedule at a testing location close to you before leaving Texas go ahead and take it there before you move. 

That way you will have your license ready when you get to Atlanta plus avoid the stress of moving while you are preparing for the NCLEX.  If it works with the timing of your planned move you can start applying to new grad positions in Atlanta before you even leave Texas. You will probably get at least a few opportunities to move beyond the online application and interview in person giving you options to explore when you get there. 

Thank you for your response. This is so helpful. I intend to start a residency in the Spring, following graduation in December. I really want to start working right away and having a semester off to wait for my license to transfer is not economically feasible right now.  I did not know that I did not physically have to be in Georgia to test for my license to apply to that state. I initially wanted to move right after graduation before the holiday but with studying for the NCLEX, it's best I stay put until I can pass my exam to avoid added stress. Thanks again! 

chare

3,504 Posts

I agree with @kbrn2002 that it is best to test in the state where you ultimately want to practice, you might not be able do this.

As both GA and TX are members of the NLC, the expectation is that you apply for licensure in your primary state of residence.  If you are licensed in TX, and your license grants multi-state privileges, when you relocate to another NLC state and apply for licensure you can work on your previous state's license while your application is being processed.

If you haven't done so you might contact the GA BON for further guidance.

Best wishes.

 

kbrn2002, ADN, RN

Specializes in Geriatrics, Dialysis. Has 20 years experience. 3,621 Posts

2 hours ago, chare said:

I agree with @kbrn2002 that it is best to test in the state where you ultimately want to practice, you might not be able do this.

As both GA and TX are members of the NLC, the expectation is that you apply for licensure in your primary state of residence.  If you are licensed in TX, and your license grants multi-state privileges, when you relocate to another NLC state and apply for licensure you can work on your previous state's license while your application is being processed.

If you haven't done so you might contact the GA BON for further guidance.

Best wishes.

 

Not true. There is sometimes no expectation to apply for licensure in your primary state of residence, in some cases the expectation is to apply for the state you intend to practice in no matter where you legally reside.  The rules  vary depending on if the states involved are compact or non-compact and also depend on if the graduate is applying for a multi-state or a single state license. 

The expectation that applies to OP's situation as both Texas and Georgia are compact states and assuming the application is multi-state is that OP applies for licensure in the state where they intend to reside, not necessarily the one they reside in now making testing for Georgia the appropriate choice.

I'm a member of the NCSBN and reasonably familiar with this and course the NCSBN words this much better and more clearly than I did so here is the direct quote from their FAQ sheet regarding which state to apply to, bolding on the pertinent line is mine: 

"Q8: I am graduating from a nursing program. Can I take the NCLEX® in a different state? The NCLEX® is a national exam and can be taken in any state convenient to you. It is not a state exam. The results will be directed to the board of nursing where you applied for your authorization to test (ATT) and licensure. • If you are applying to a compact state for a multistate license, you should apply in the state where you intend to legally reside. • If you are applying for a license in a noncompact state, you should apply for a license in the state where you intend to practice." 

Edited by kbrn2002

feelix

feelix, RN

313 Posts

On 5/2/2022 at 11:31 AM, LeoStudentNurse22 said:

 I really want to start working right away and having a semester off to wait for my license to transfer is not economically feasible right now.  

You can actually start working even before you know you passed. Once you sit for the exam and have  graduate nurse license in the state, employers will hire you provisionally, even before you get your NCLEX results. Once you pass, you will be confirmed. 

 

NICU Guy, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 7 years experience. 4,066 Posts

On 5/2/2022 at 12:35 PM, LeoStudentNurse22 said:

How did the interviews go in person? Were you able to shadow while you were there? 

One of the in-person interviews, I had to fly from the Mid West to North Carolina, so they invited me to shadow as long as I wanted after the interview. I shadowed for numerous hours in order to get an accurate idea of the work environment. I was offered a position at my current hospital while on the plane before I left North Carolina.

ayuhime

ayuhime, BSN

150 Posts

I relocated from las vegas to los angeles without any connections or a job lined up. The process took some time to do license by endorsement but that's about it. Applying for jobs in such a densely populated state took some time and now I'm working at one of the top hospitals in LA 🙂