On Having 2 Titles: Nurse and Patient

Published

Specializes in Renal and Telemetry. Has 5 years experience.

What happens when you're both a patient and a nurse? As a diabetic, I wear two titles: LPN and diabetic. Although I am sad to have been diagnosed with this disease, especially at a young age, it is a blessing in disguise, as I now understand why I was "called" to nursing. To me it is not only a "calling", it is my life. You are reading page 3 of On Having 2 Titles: Nurse and Patient. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

ButterflyRN90

Specializes in Renal and Telemetry. Has 5 years experience.

It is not judgmental to tell the OP she should not be driving with dangerously low blood sugar. There are plenty of solutions here: Get up earlier and have a decent breakfast, grab some glucose tabs at Walgreens and leave them in the glove compartment, pack a high-protein snack in the bedside drawer and munch it during your morning devotions . . . It's called planning ahead like an adult.

I don't mean to be condescending or belittling, but I am holding down a full-time job while studying nursing full-time. This means 18 hour days and rush mornings. This means me and the wife go to Sam's on Sundays after church and get materials to make little breakfast and afternoon snack packs. Things like mini breakfast sandwiches, fruits, nuts, seeds, and granola bars that go into Zip-Locs and my backpack. I keep an emergency stash in my desk at work and in the trunk of the car. We make it a point to share lunch together whenever possible, but most days it is rush, rush, rush for my other meals.

To the OP, from one Christian to another, God is not honored by someone putting other drivers' lives at risk. Also, it is wise to heed the reproof of others instead of getting defensive (Proverbs 13:20). You need to find a way to control that sugar. Or call a cab, take the bus, carpool, something. If you are called to nursing, then your first ministry is to protect the lives and health of everyone around you - in the hospital or out of it. If an alcoholic insisted that the wreck wasn't their fault because they didn't have time to sober up . . .

Did you seriously just tell me God isn't honored....? Don't judge my faith. I work full time in nursing, full time RN student and I also have other tasks. Every diabetic's situation is different. Majority of posters are judgmental. Again, I will ignore criticism. I have no time for it.

ButterflyRN90

Specializes in Renal and Telemetry. Has 5 years experience.

To those who enjoyed the article, I am glad for the positive input. For those with negative feedback, I'm sorry it wasn't to your liking. Telling me about how YOU handle your disease is not the purpose of said article. Therefore, since this is the internet you are allowed to post your opinion, but I will not acknowledge it, especially one that judges my faith. Don't go there. I'm Christian, but I don't take kindly to someone listing my flaws when I'm sure they have a plank of issues in their own eye. :)

VivaLasViejas, ASN, RN

Specializes in LTC, assisted living, med-surg, psych. Has 20 years experience.

I've been around these forums for a lot of years, and believe me I've seen my fair share of personal attacks. What people have posted here are not personal attacks. A personal attack is when someone says "You're an idiot for doing what you did" or "How stupid can you be?" Merely because you don't like the fact that members have expressed very real concerns about your driving behavior, does not mean they are attacking you. In fact, I agree with them that you would do well to get up earlier and eat properly so that you don't pose a risk to others on the road. You yourself said that your blood sugar tends to drop precipitously; why ever would you take the risk of driving when you're low and haven't eaten a decent breakfast?

For what it's worth, I too am a type 2 diabetic whose blood sugar tends to plunge once it starts spiraling down. But I've learned to have a bit of protein and complex carbohydrates before I go anywhere, and I carry glucose tablets with me at all times because I know what will happen if I crash. I've been known to become agitated and belligerent, confused, shaky, and sleepy all at once. So I think it's better to prevent the whole thing by being proactive, but when I do start heading down and I'm out somewhere, I don't drive until I've completely recovered.

I'm sorry if you don't like hearing this, but the only thing we're trying to do here is help prevent you, and perhaps someone else, from becoming a statistic. You surely could not have posted this expecting that people wouldn't question your judgment in driving while impaired due to low blood sugar levels.

I won't belabor the issue, but I did want to clarify what the Terms of Service says about personal attacks and to express my own concerns for you. Have a nice evening.

ButterflyRN90

Specializes in Renal and Telemetry. Has 5 years experience.

I am not type 2. Sorry. This isn't the same. I have continuous insulin and therefore can't just stop my pump if I "feel" like it "might" go low.

blondy2061h, MSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology. Has 15 years experience.

Sadly, you just sounded like the Peds instructor, who, had I continued the story, commented the same thing. Unless you are a diabetic, you don't personally understand how quickly a normal blood sugar can drop. I had it recently happen that it was 84 and driving to get something fast to eat, ended up dropping to 68 just sitting at the drive thru line. Had to eat quickly in the parking lot. Yes, I know I should correct it and I had two waffles, thing is it takes longer for carbs to kick in than it does a simple sugar.

Are you using a continuous glucose monitor? I'm guessing if you're feeling non-functional at 68 and have been in DKA 5x you're frequently running quite high. I'd really advise you to take a look at your control and see what you can be doing differently, for both you and your patients. I'm also diabetic so I know how hard it can be. The Dexcom really is a game changer.

ButterflyRN90

Specializes in Renal and Telemetry. Has 5 years experience.

Are you using a continuous glucose monitor? I'm guessing if you're feeling non-functional at 68 and have been in DKA 5x you're frequently running quite high. I'd really advise you to take a look at your control and see what you can be doing differently, for both you and your patients. I'm also diabetic so I know how hard it can be. The Dexcom really is a game changer.

Hey! Yes I used it but for some reason if I lay on my stomach it reads different numbers. I've also played a game and having it hit that area gives a higher reading than normal. It's frustrating at times. I have the Paradigm from Minimed and the last time I was hospitalized was because the tubing kinked but the alarm never sounded. I try my hardest but sometimes it's just impossible to know what your sugar is going to do every minute of every day. Even crying affects it. I stopped using the CGM also because it hurt to insert but I just got the new Enlite system. I'm gonna insert it tomorrow. :)

duskyjewel

Specializes in hospice.

But you can manage your time better to make sure you eat, and to make better choices about what you eat rather than going to a drive through. There are lots of healthy snacks that can be packed in a book bag or purse.

When you put something out in public on a discussion board, you can't expect people not to discuss it. You were as dangerous as a drunk driver, and are every time you drive that way.

As to the comment about God not being honored, no one judged or questioned your faith. That poster pointed out that claiming God while endangering yourself and others does not honor Him. How can you say that's wrong?

Anyway, since you say you're currently a student again, I hope you've learned from your mistakes and have become both a more effective student and a safer driver.

ButterflyRN90

Specializes in Renal and Telemetry. Has 5 years experience.

But you can manage your time better to make sure you eat, and to make better choices about what you eat rather than going to a drive through. There are lots of healthy snacks that can be packed in a book bag or purse.

When you put something out in public on a discussion board, you can't expect people not to discuss it. You were as dangerous as a drunk driver, and are every time you drive that way.

As to the comment about God not being honored, no one judged or questioned your faith. That poster pointed out that claiming God while endangering yourself and others does not honor Him. How can you say that's wrong?

Anyway, since you say you're currently a student again, I hope you've learned from your mistakes and have become both a more effective student and a safer driver.

I claim God in everything I do. I mentioned His name in regards to why I feel I was called to nursing. Yes, I've learned my lessons. Maybe I should have posted the date that this happened. Maybe then people wouldn't assume I'm currently practicing unsafe methods... :)

blondy2061h, MSN, RN

Specializes in Oncology. Has 15 years experience.

Hey! Yes I used it but for some reason if I lay on my stomach it reads different numbers. I've also played a game and having it hit that area gives a higher reading than normal. It's frustrating at times. I have the Paradigm from Minimed and the last time I was hospitalized was because the tubing kinked but the alarm never sounded. I try my hardest but sometimes it's just impossible to know what your sugar is going to do every minute of every day. Even crying affects it. I stopped using the CGM also because it hurt to insert but I just got the new Enlite system. I'm gonna insert it tomorrow. :)

I had both the 522 and 523 with the Sof Sensor, then the 530g with Enlite. I NEVER got good accuracy from the Medtronic. I am using the Dexcom now and it's soooo much better. It's usually within 5 of my meter. I also switched to the Omnipod and am loving it. If you haven't already read them, I'd strongly recommend the books Think Like a Pancreas and Pumpin Insulin. They really helped me fine tune my pump settings and get awesome control. Good luck!

ButterflyRN90

Specializes in Renal and Telemetry. Has 5 years experience.

I had both the 522 and 523 with the Sof Sensor, then the 530g with Enlite. I NEVER got good accuracy from the Medtronic. I am using the Dexcom now and it's soooo much better. It's usually within 5 of my meter. I also switched to the Omnipod and am loving it. If you haven't already read them, I'd strongly recommend the books Think Like a Pancreas and Pumpin Insulin. They really helped me fine tune my pump settings and get awesome control. Good luck!

Will definitely check it out. I'm not sure if I'd be able to switch pumps (insurance), I'll have to see what can be done. I find more positive reviews on non Minimed pumps. :)

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

Interesting, well-written post. Thank you for sharing.

Sharing, however, does not entitle you to positive responses only as I know well from bitter experience. Please don't drive impaired if you can help it. Sometimes you may not be able to help it, but clearly you knew you were doing something wrong that morning and should not have been driving.

Ruby Vee, BSN

Specializes in CCU, SICU, CVSICU, Precepting & Teaching. Has 40 years experience.

Again, I posted this as an article to share how this disease has allowed me to see both perspectives. I really don't care to argue and will just ignore the personal attacks. Damned if you do and damned if you don't. :)

I've seen no personal attacks; just folks who are concerned about you arguing that you value yourself enough not to drive impaired.