On Having 2 Titles: Nurse and Patient

Published

Specializes in Renal and Telemetry. Has 5 years experience.

What happens when you're both a patient and a nurse? As a diabetic, I wear two titles: LPN and diabetic. Although I am sad to have been diagnosed with this disease, especially at a young age, it is a blessing in disguise, as I now understand why I was "called" to nursing. To me it is not only a "calling", it is my life. You are reading page 2 of On Having 2 Titles: Nurse and Patient. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

The thread of "no good deed goes unpunished" pops into my head.

I recall posters talking about someone who wrote an article that was meant to provide insights and was instead being attacked personally. Some of the same posters are on this thread doing exactly what they criticized. Funny how the internet works.

To the OP I hope you learned from any mistakes you made and that it made you a better nurse. I am sure it did. Don't let random people on the internet have enough control over you to make you upset. It is a recipe for failure.

ButterflyRN90

Specializes in Renal and Telemetry. Has 5 years experience.

That's the beauty of the Internet...nurses concerned looks like a "lecture"; even though there's no tone.

The fact remains, as you pointed out in your article; a healthy nurse is a better nurse.

Best wishes in balancing your health issues and your studies.

That's why it's imperative to review your post before publishing. One poster mentioned her comment would sound judgemental, yet they proceeded to comment knowing fully well the reaction of the OP. It's quite annoying being spoken to like a child (lectured), when you're a professional who is fully aware. I wrote this to express something I felt was worth sharing. Now I'm not so sure anymore.

ButterflyRN90

Specializes in Renal and Telemetry. Has 5 years experience.

Everyone, I am not perfect. No one is. I enjoy positive discussions, just please refrain from "lecturing" me. Thank you. :)

LadyFree28, BSN, RN

Specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma. Has 10 years experience.

That's why it's imperative to review your post before publishing. One poster mentioned her comment would sound judgemental, yet they proceeded to comment knowing fully well the reaction of the OP. It's quite annoying being spoken to like a child (lectured), when you're a professional who is fully aware. I wrote this to express something I felt was worth sharing. Now I'm not so sure anymore.

Whose to say people aren't reviewing their own posts before posting?

My point is your willingness to put stock into what people posts is certainly up to you; however, being objective to what the Internet responses will save you a ton of stress, IMHO.

Your post may help others; but then again, it may (can't say without body language and tone) be criticized, again, that happens even in face to face conversations; once you make the decision to share that's the risk one takes...:whistling:

ButterflyRN90

Specializes in Renal and Telemetry. Has 5 years experience.

The thread of "no good deed goes unpunished" pops into my head.

I recall posters talking about someone who wrote an article that was meant to provide insights and was instead being attacked personally. Some of the same posters are on this thread doing exactly what they criticized. Funny how the internet works.

To the OP I hope you learned from any mistakes you made and that it made you a better nurse. I am sure it did. Don't let random people on the internet have enough control over you to make you upset. It is a recipe for failure.

Thank you. I did learn my lessons, albeit very slowly, but it's improved my ability to empathize and advocate. :)

ButterflyRN90

Specializes in Renal and Telemetry. Has 5 years experience.

Constructive criticism is better than plain criticism.

Why criticize at all? This isn't me asking for advice. It's me sharing something.

ButterflyRN90

Specializes in Renal and Telemetry. Has 5 years experience.

Whose to say people aren't reviewing their own posts before posting?

My point is your willingness to put stock into what people posts is certainly up to you; however, being objective to what the Internet responses will save you a ton of stress, IMHO.

Your post may help others; but then again, it may (can't say without body language and tone) be criticized, again, that happens even in face to face conversations; once you make the decision to share that's the risk one takes...:whistling:

You're right. I'll just ignore the criticism. :)

macawake, MSN

Has 13 years experience.

That's why it's imperative to review your post before publishing. One poster mentioned her comment would sound judgemental, yet they proceeded to comment knowing fully well the reaction of the OP. It's quite annoying being spoken to like a child (lectured), when you're a professional who is fully aware. I wrote this to express something I felt was worth sharing. Now I'm not so sure anymore.

You don’t think it’s at least slightly controversial to admit that you drive a car in high speed when you’re dizzy, shaky and so weak that you can’t even stand? You are not describing a safe driver.

I’ve had several surgeries and for a couple of days after each have taken some pretty heavy duty painkillers. I would not drive a car until I stopped taking these and had recovered full range of motion. Would you think I’d been wise to be driving a car during this time or would I indeed have been in need of a “lecture”? I hope that someone would have confronted me if I’d exercised such poor judgment.

I’m sorry that you have to deal with this disease. I gave you the same advice I would have given any family member, friend or patient who’d had told me the same story you did. I did think before I posted. The fact that I had a suspicion that you wouldn’t appreciate my post isn’t a good enough reason for me to not post, when I really think that you need to hear it. You can’t hear my tone of voice or see my facial expression. I’m not trying to belittle you. I’m attempting to make you realize that what you’re doing is dangerous, for you and for others.

Even now, you don’t seem to appreciate the gravity of the situation. You said in your OP that you knew you shouldn’t drive. Yet you chose to. Why? Why wait until you’re already in your car driving to “stuff two waffles down your gullet”? Why not pull over until you feel better? While being late to clinicals isn’t ideal, I think that you and I both can agree that being in or causing an accident is significantly worse.

I’m sorry that your post didn’t get the more positive reception you hoped for. The part I quoted was unfortunately the part that grabbed my attention. I was recently involved in the care of a very young person, much younger than you. The person was the victim of a car accident, the many hours spent in surgery trying to repair the damage and save the life of this young person proved futile. The driver who caused the accident turned out to be impaired due to an illness.

OP, I harbor no ill will against you. I’m simply trying to get through to you.

ButterflyRN90

Specializes in Renal and Telemetry. Has 5 years experience.

Again, I posted this as an article to share how this disease has allowed me to see both perspectives. I really don't care to argue and will just ignore the personal attacks. Damned if you do and damned if you don't. :)

JoseQuinones

Has 5 years experience.

It is not judgmental to tell the OP she should not be driving with dangerously low blood sugar. There are plenty of solutions here: Get up earlier and have a decent breakfast, grab some glucose tabs at Walgreens and leave them in the glove compartment, pack a high-protein snack in the bedside drawer and munch it during your morning devotions . . . It's called planning ahead like an adult.

I don't mean to be condescending or belittling, but I am holding down a full-time job while studying nursing full-time. This means 18 hour days and rush mornings. This means me and the wife go to Sam's on Sundays after church and get materials to make little breakfast and afternoon snack packs. Things like mini breakfast sandwiches, fruits, nuts, seeds, and granola bars that go into Zip-Locs and my backpack. I keep an emergency stash in my desk at work and in the trunk of the car. We make it a point to share lunch together whenever possible, but most days it is rush, rush, rush for my other meals.

To the OP, from one Christian to another, God is not honored by someone putting other drivers' lives at risk. Also, it is wise to heed the reproof of others instead of getting defensive (Proverbs 13:20). You need to find a way to control that sugar. Or call a cab, take the bus, carpool, something. If you are called to nursing, then your first ministry is to protect the lives and health of everyone around you - in the hospital or out of it. If an alcoholic insisted that the wreck wasn't their fault because they didn't have time to sober up . . .

Since the original poster has 2 years experience according to her profile and the story recounts her driving as a student I think it is safe to say that the criticism of her driving is a few years too late to make a difference.

But by all means lets beat the dead horse some more.