Jump to content

Nursing shortages, Baby boomers and the immigrant nurse Part 2

Nurses Article   (25,148 Views | 109 Replies | 321 Words)

madwife2002 has 26 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in RN, BSN, CHDN.

1 Follower; 74 Articles; 121,176 Profile Views; 4,777 Posts

It has been a couple of weeks since we reviewed the ongoing poll about foreign trained nurses in the USA and the trend towards blaming immigrant nurses for taking the jobs which should or should not belong to American Nurses. You are reading page 6 of Nursing shortages, Baby boomers and the immigrant nurse Part 2. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

3 Posts; 579 Profile Views

Yes, my experience is category A) or B) is preferred. I belong to category B, given all other factors being equal. But it also depends on how good the hospital recruiter or hiring manager is. When I started out, some HR staff would not even look at my application packet while my classmates got the jobs very easily. And to think I graduated at the top my my class. I am sure my English is fine. After all, prior to nursing, I earned my living talking to people and writing business reports professionally. But it took a lot of convincing to make the hiring managers sit up and listen. When I was in nursing school, I was even suspected by one professor of plagiarism because according to her, my research paper was grad school quality. I think that as nurses, we should practice what we preach about reserving judgment until we know the other person better. Stereotyping is unprofessional.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

noc4senuf specializes in Geriatrics, WCC.

683 Posts; 8,517 Profile Views

My nursing staff is multi-cultural. Most nurses coming from various countries in Africa with English as a second language. I like to think for the most part that they are all very good and competent. But, the things i have found to cause problems are... they have such a strong accent that no one can understand them, esp on the phone; their documentation and writing skills are poor with sentence formation, they do not always understand the wants and needs of a resident in the American culture, many older residents are racist and do not want "those" people to take care of them, and a multitude of others.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

End Game RN is a RN and specializes in Neuroscience ICU.

2 Articles; 57 Posts; 3,552 Profile Views

We have a great staff in our unit, many of them from other countries, even different continents. We are different in so many ways, but somehow this makes us more alike than you would believe. I am grateful for the opportunity to work with such a diverse group of professionals. We have fun and work pretty well together. I can't imagine a homogenous working environment..boring!!!

Infinite diversity in infinite combinations, something I've remembered from Star Trek, the original series...a Spockism.

Thats my take on foreign born and educated nurses. Love 'em!!!!!!

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

DixieRedHead has 20 years experience as a ASN, RN and specializes in ED/ICU/TELEMETRY/LTC.

638 Posts; 9,698 Profile Views

I believe that the "foreign nurses" being addressed here are those who are trained in another country, come here barely speaking or writing the language, and are funneled in at at low rate of pay.

They do not understand the process, and they are not help, they are hindrance.

When you need staff you need staff. But it's not just numbers. You need seasoned staff or at least staff that can bear part of the load in relative amount of time. You don't have time to explain the language of this land to someone who in additon to they pay is getting housing subsidy, a car loan guarantee.

I don't care what color they are, or whether or not they have an accent. But fair is fair.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

38 Posts; 1,572 Profile Views

OK,here..I'm not talking of the nurses coming here from other countries..and on the contrary..they only nurses that are widely allowed to work here in the us is from Europe.so with them it's not the English that's an issue.

but those from Africa have accent problem..but we all know they are the most suitable for the job apart from the accent part.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

noc4senuf specializes in Geriatrics, WCC.

683 Posts; 8,517 Profile Views

I interviewed a nurse a while back that had many years of experience in another country.... ICU, triage, surgical, etc.

During the interview i started to have my doubts and began to ask questions about INR's, coumadin and other meds..... she had absolutely no clus as to what I was talking about. Further questions lead me to wonder how she ever got licensed and passed the boards here.

Needless to say, I did not hire.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

38 Posts; 1,572 Profile Views

In this case..i see why.some people have a good knowledge of how to pass tests here.so i think they faked that they had experience...outside us..it's easy to get the credentials...when you have money you can get anything in other county's.so that might be the case.you made a very wise decision..patients safety and interest comes first.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

K.P.A. has 2 years experience and specializes in mental health.

205 Posts; 4,037 Profile Views

The main argument against H1B workers is that shortages are best relieved by increasing salaries. Filling vacancies with foreign workers rather than allowing the market to adjust leads to fewer domestic workers in the field and even greater shortages.

Don't fret. In two years $US value will be a disincentive to H1B workers. US citizens will vie for overseas work. As a bonus, the US govt.(sole insurer) will control salaries, working conditions, protocols, and treatments with no room for negotiation. Such is the cost of this years market interference and newly printed "money".

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

1 Post; 578 Profile Views

Hi, thanks for the post. I am one of the real foreign nurses and looking for a job in the usa. However, I don't think we are going to take jobs away from any local nurses. If hospitals can find any local nurses who are more competant to the job, they won't take the pain to hire foreign nurses. In other words, hospitals will only employ foreign nurses when they couldn't find enough american nurses.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

19 Posts; 1,299 Profile Views

Interesting that this blog is still going.... but here is a reality check for some of you... http://immigrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/docs/Critical_Care.pdf

Sorry... it seems to me that, if you're educated, have passed ALL the tests that are required to even be eligible to sit for the NCLEX, pass the NCLEX just like any US trained RN, and then apply and compete against all aplicants for a job position, and you get that position.... then you deserve it!!!! so pat yourselves on the back "immigrant nurses" and be proud of what we have accomplished........

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

3 Posts; 675 Profile Views

I read your blog about foreign Nurses. The issue is NOT foreigners, but they level of RN training. Philippino nurses are being trained in their countries by American professionals and Philippino nurses are well prepared for the job.

Others have to take a different (foreigner-favorable) NCLEX after being "retrained". Some countries prepare nurses mainly "hands-on" and their program curricula is very weak and these nurses lack deep knowledge and critical thinking skills. Yet, they are "automatically" accepted as RN's provided they confirm their licenses by taking a test (I emphasize: a test different from NCLEX-RN given to AMERICAN trained nurses). It is very profitable to create "nurse shortage" -- lawyers, educational, hospital facilities recieve grants if they retrain foreign nurses and streamline them into the US hospitals. Somebody has to stop the practice and expand opportunities of AMERICANS who are willing to study and become nurses. They also have to give preference to those who have worked in healthcare before. It is a know fact that as soon as the oppotunity arises, RNs leave the "floor" and joint the administrative staff.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

2 Followers; 14,620 Posts; 104,754 Profile Views

Interesting that this blog is still going.... but here is a reality check for some of you... http://immigrationpolicy.org/sites/default/files/docs/Critical_Care.pdf

The Immigration Policy Center is a branch of the "think tank" operated by the American Immigration Lawyers Association, the members of which all make their living off people coming to the US from other countries. I would hardly consider them a neutral, unbiased source of information.

"The American Immigration Council (formerly the American Immigration Law Foundation) was established in 1987 as an IRS designated 501©(3), tax-exempt, not-for-profit educational, charitable organization by the leaders of the American Immigration Lawyers Association (AILA).

The mission of the American Immigration Council is to strengthen America by honoring our immigrant history and shaping how Americans think and act towards immigration now and in the future.

The American Immigration Council exists to promote the prosperity and cultural richness of our diverse nation by:

1. Educating citizens about the enduring contributions of America's immigrants;

2. Standing up for sensible and humane immigration policies that reflect American values;

3. Insisting that our immigration laws be enacted and implemented in a way that honors fundamental constitutional and human rights;

4. Working tirelessly to achieve justice and fairness for immigrants under the law."

http://www.americanimmigrationcouncil.org/who-we-are

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
×

This site uses cookies. By using this site, you consent to the placement of these cookies. Read our Privacy, Cookies, and Terms of Service Policies to learn more.