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Nursing instructor question: flipped classrooms?

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jrsbsn jrsbsn (New) New

Hello,

I am a new nursing instructor. As a student I hated power points and preferred on-line learning. I have heard that flipped classrooms are a great way for students to learn and they sound like it is the best of the on-line/classroom combined. I have finished one class and moving on to med/surg. I really feel like my students will learn more if they get more active/hands on time in the classroom. Has anyone tried this in a nursing class yet or been part of a class that has been flipped?

mirandaaa

Specializes in PCT, RN. Has 3 years experience.

I feel like this is a great thing.

I feel like I can focus so much more on learning things when I am at home but I actually WORK better in the classroom.

HelloWish, ADN, BSN

Specializes in IMCU, Oncology. Has 3 years experience.

I am a nursing student.

I think it depends on how each student learns and if you focus on only one way of teaching, then you aren't meeting the needs of all your students learning styles.

I don't know what you personally mean by hands on learning in the classroom and I don't know what a flipped classroom is either. However, I have two professors who consider hands on learning to have the students come and teach the class. I can understand doing that once in while, but personally found it lazy and inappropriate for every class esp. without prep time. It was a complete waste of time where I felt didn't learn a thing.

I have one professor who lectures and uses PPTs and I learn a lot from this professor. He is an awesome teacher! However, there is a serious disconnect between what this professor emphasizes in class and what he tests over. Anyway, this professor talks about all the ways in which he prioritizes and works in simple ways to make a difference for his patients. I learn so much from him. I like to hear lecture and feel as a student that if I am paying to go to a school that the teacher should teach. I really learn from professors who talk about what we should know as nurses and their experiences as nurses too!

Hands on learning is great, if you don't mean having your students teach the class every time! :-)

kalycat, BSN, RN

Specializes in CVICU CCRN. Has 5 years experience.

I loved my flipped classes. I feel like the discussions that ensued really helped facilitate critical thinking. We did have a content wrap up weekly to focus our study prior to tests, which helped ensure we had touched on all the key content with sufficient depth. Good luck; I truly feel that increased engagement often equals increased learning. :)

llg, PhD, RN

Specializes in Nursing Professional Development. Has 44 years experience.

I am not one to "jump on bandwagons" in general. I see the concept of the "flipped classroom" as just the latest in a long series of buzzwords for program administrators to push -- and for the people who are the supposed experts in the technique to make more money selling stuff about it.

Sure it is based on sound educational principles and can be great when everything falls nicely into place. It's great to have the students do activities on their own before class (readings, computer stuff, whatever) and then come to class prepared to participate in activities designed to apply that knowledge. Good teaching has always included that approach. It's nothing new! But like every other approach/technique, it shouldn't be over-used. Some students may struggle learning the concepts on their own before class and may need face time with a teacher who can explain the material and/or help the students link the concepts to other content. A good lecture can be a good thing.

Also, some students learn better one way ... other students learn better in different ways. I support using a variety of teaching methods to approach content from multiple angles to help students stimulate multiple learning pathways and to "round out" their learning. The flipped classroom is one of many good techniques to promote learning. I like to use it ... but I don't limit myself to that.

Sure it is based on sound educational principles and can be great when everything falls nicely into place. It's great to have the students do activities on their own before class (readings, computer stuff, whatever) and then come to class prepared to participate in activities designed to apply that knowledge. Good teaching has always included that approach. It's nothing new!

Yes, I was using this approach to teach psych nursing twenty years ago. People just keep coming up with new "labels" for things that have been around for a long time.

CraigB-RN, MSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, Emergency, Education, Informatics. Has 40 years experience.

The basic concept is old, what's new is the technology that can be used now. Evolutionary not revolutionary.

The advantage to a nurse or any provider for that matter is the concepts of the flipped classroom and the habits that you can develop will help you in your career.

Medicine changes rapidly and being able to read and learn on your own, and not wait for someone to stand up and lecture to you can put you ahead of everyone else.

The whole learning style thing only caries you so far. You have to be able to read a journal and learn, and ideally many different journals.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership. Has 15 years experience.

What the heck is a flipped classroom?

CraigB-RN, MSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, Emergency, Education, Informatics. Has 40 years experience.

The short version is the students prep BEFORE the class, read the material, study and you use class time for discusion, simulation, etc. Don't "waste" classroom time with lecture.

klone, MSN, RN

Specializes in Women's Health/OB Leadership. Has 15 years experience.

Why is that called a flipped class?

CraigB-RN, MSN, RN

Specializes in Critical Care, Emergency, Education, Informatics. Has 40 years experience.

Flipped 180 from the "normal" way. Reversing it as it were.

kalycat, BSN, RN

Specializes in CVICU CCRN. Has 5 years experience.

Why is that called a flipped class?

In my school's case, they actually took it a step further and the students were responsible for presenting a certain percentage of the content, with the Prof guiding and providing some activities and materials on key concepts. Not all the classes were this way, but the expectation for all of the classes was that you did your prep the night before so that you could come prepared with questions or contributions. Lecture was minimalist with much more Socratic method engagement and not so many powerpoints. Lots of good discussions ensued and I felt like even people who were afraid to ask questions participated and gained a lot from hearing other students' questions or insight.

I know that doing prep the night before isn't really a revolutionary concept (that has always been my practice) but I did really enjoy the high level of engagement and accountability promoted by this class style.

SRDAVIS

Specializes in Tele, Stepdown, Med/Surg, education. Has 10 years experience.

Why is that called a flipped class?

video/recorded lecture at home

homework in class, activities to facilitate learning in class. so it's flipped