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Nursing and the Ebola Virus

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by 0.adamantite 0.adamantite (Member) Member

0.adamantite has 3 years experience and specializes in Acute Care - Adult, Med Surg, Neuro.

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You are reading page 33 of Nursing and the Ebola Virus. If you want to start from the beginning Go to First Page.

MassED has 15 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

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I think it is more likely that the nurse or nursing "assistant" as one article called her may have not been careful enough about the precautions required. Who knows? All speculation. I wouldn't jump to it being airborne or a bunch of people would be sick and a virus has never done that.

That would be incorrect.

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classicdame is a MSN, EdD and specializes in Hospital Education Coordinator.

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I doubt lack of insurance played a part. For one thing, who reads and makes decisions based on that part of the patient's history? In Texas, hospitals can bill the State for charity work done. Also, not being acutley ill will mean you get d/c from ER. I believe it was poor communication, on both the part of the patient and the staff.

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caroladybelle is a BSN, RN and specializes in Oncology/Haemetology/HIV.

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I am skeptical of this story....

Especially since it comes from Daily Mail.

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macawake has 10 years experience.

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Regarding monoclonal antibodies. As I’m sure that most/all of you already know, anaphylaxis is a systemic hypersensitivity reaction mediated by interactions between immunoglobulin IgE and mast cells.

The first monoclonal antibodies were murine-derived and were highly immunogenic to

humans, i.e. had a very high risk of anaphylactic reactions. After that came chimeric monoclonal antibodies which consisted of approximately one third mouse proteins. Then came humanized monoclonal antibodies (~10% mouse protein) and fully human (protein) monoclonal antibodies (no mouse protein).

As far as I know, both chimeric, humanized and fully human mab’s are in clinical use today, but it's not my area of expertize so take it with a grain of salt.

The risk of an anaphylactic reaction (by a human being) to a specific monoclonal antibody depends on how much mouse protein it contains.

That would be incorrect.

I’m curious, what human virus can you name that has changed its’ mode of transmission to airborne can you name?

Quite a few posters seem to worry about the Ebola virus changing its’ mode of transmission.

Much more than a 100 million people have been infected by the Hepatitis C virus since it was discovered. Yet, today it is still transmitted the same way that it was when it was discovered in the 1980s’.

The Ebola virus doesn’t attack or dwell in the respiratory system in human beings, it’s partial to the liver. What would be this virus’ evolutionary motivator to suddenly find a way to attach to cells and replicate in the airways?

I believe that it’s understandable but misguided fear, and most definitely not scientific knowledge, that is the reason behind worry for possible future airborne transmission of the Ebola virus.

Edited by macawake

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LadyFree28 has 10 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in Pediatrics, Rehab, Trauma.

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Regarding monoclonal antibodies. As I'm sure that most/all of you already know, anaphylaxis is a systemic hypersensitivity reaction mediated by interactions between immunoglobulin IgE and mast cells.

The first monoclonal antibodies were murine-derived and were highly immunogenic to

humans, i.e. had a very high risk of anaphylactic reactions. After that came chimeric monoclonal antibodies which consisted of approximately one third mouse proteins. Then came humanized monoclonal antibodies (~10% mouse protein) and fully human (protein) monoclonal antibodies (no mouse protein).

As far as I know, both chimeric, humanized and fully human mab's are in clinical use today, but it's not my area of expertize so take it with a grain of salt.

The risk of an anaphylactic reaction (by a human being) to a specific monoclonal antibody depends on how much mouse protein it contains.

I'm curious, what human virus can you name that has changed its' mode of transmission to airborne can you name?

Quite a few posters seem to worry about the Ebola virus changing its' mode of transmission.

Much more than a 100 million people have been infected by the Hepatitis C virus since it was discovered. Yet, today it is still transmitted the same way that it was when it was discovered in the 1980s'.

The Ebola virus doesn't attack or dwell in the respiratory system in human beings, it's partial to the liver. What would be this virus' evolutionary motivator to suddenly find a way to attach to cells and replicate in the airways?

I believe that it's understandable but misguided fear, and most definitely not scientific knowledge, that is the reason behind worry for possible future airborne transmission of the Ebola virus.

Thank You... :yes:

I am curious as well to WHAT viruses have mutated as well; because of it's target specificity, and viruses such as HIV and HepC that are target specific, what makes Ebola different that it will "mutate"?

HIV has undergone some form of "mutation"; however the mode of transition is the same.

Again, what makes Ebola different?

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Are you a credible source? Add your Credentials, Experience, etc.

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Avigan produced by Japanese firm Toyama Chemical was used on the French nurse. Anyone know how it's made, how fast it can be made and what side effects to worry about? It might be quicker than Zmapp

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caroladybelle is a BSN, RN and specializes in Oncology/Haemetology/HIV.

5,486 Posts; 29,508 Profile Views

Avigan produced by Japanese firm Toyama Chemical was used on the French nurse. Anyone know how it's made, how fast it can be made and what side effects to worry about? It might be quicker than Zmapp

The drug was developed for use with arising and novel forms of influenza. While it is listed as used for one case, there is indications of other use or testing for use with ebola. There is a supply of it as it is an established drug.

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MassED has 15 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

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Regarding monoclonal antibodies. As I'm sure that most/all of you already know, anaphylaxis is a systemic hypersensitivity reaction mediated by interactions between immunoglobulin IgE and mast cells.

The first monoclonal antibodies were murine-derived and were highly immunogenic to

humans, i.e. had a very high risk of anaphylactic reactions. After that came chimeric monoclonal antibodies which consisted of approximately one third mouse proteins. Then came humanized monoclonal antibodies (~10% mouse protein) and fully human (protein) monoclonal antibodies (no mouse protein).

As far as I know, both chimeric, humanized and fully human mab's are in clinical use today, but it's not my area of expertize so take it with a grain of salt.

The risk of an anaphylactic reaction (by a human being) to a specific monoclonal antibody depends on how much mouse protein it contains.

I'm curious, what human virus can you name that has changed its' mode of transmission to airborne can you name?

Quite a few posters seem to worry about the Ebola virus changing its' mode of transmission.

Much more than a 100 million people have been infected by the Hepatitis C virus since it was discovered. Yet, today it is still transmitted the same way that it was when it was discovered in the 1980s'.

The Ebola virus doesn't attack or dwell in the respiratory system in human beings, it's partial to the liver. What would be this virus' evolutionary motivator to suddenly find a way to attach to cells and replicate in the airways?

I believe that it's understandable but misguided fear, and most definitely not scientific knowledge, that is the reason behind worry for possible future airborne transmission of the Ebola virus.

Ebola has gone airborne before. Remember there are different strains and the mutation of this virus has been called "sloppy."

Everyone can post about these assurances about it not being airborne, and feeling confident that it won't mutate. That is living in a bubble. One has to live in reality and deal with the very real unknown. It has not been contained. This is the deadliest outbreak since it was first noted.

The virus does dwell in bodily fluids. That includes respiratory secretions that may wind up out of one's body, such as with a sneeze. Any way you'd like to slice it, any way you'd like to justify your logic is fine. Whatever keeps you happy in your bubble.

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imintrouble has 16 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in LTC Rehab Med/Surg.

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I'm sorry that this man has died. But I can't help but wonder if he might have lived, if he'd told the ER staff on the first visit, that he'd had close contact with a dying Ebola patient in Africa.

To me it reaffirms the importance of being completely honest with health care professionals.

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MassED has 15 years experience as a BSN, RN and specializes in ER.

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I saw in one article that it was hypothesized taking the PPE off incorrectly could be infecting people.

Don't you think that a healthcare individual would take EXTRAORDINARY care in the placement and removal of their PPE??

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