Resigning during orientation

  1. Unfortunately, I have decided to resign during my orientation--do I need to give a formal "resignation" letter? What about any resignation notice? Concerning my resume, do I need to keep this orientation on it or can I leave it off? Thanks in advance for any info!
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    About lynn27

    Joined: Sep '03; Posts: 56; Likes: 3

    17 Comments

  3. by   Town & Country
    Why on earth would you resign during orientation? You haven't even given it a chance.


    I would like to know why you want to resign.

    Whatever the reason is, I think you should definitely RECONSIDER!
  4. by   llg
    Yes, you need to write a resignation letter. You want to end the situation as positively as you can and, if possible, leave your former employer with a good impression of you.

    You should probably talk with your employer and ask what they would prefer in terms of notice. Some employers may want the standard 2 weeks. However, some employers may want you to leave immediately so that they don't have to invest more orientation time (preceptor hours, class time, etc.) in your education, pay benefits, etc. for an employee who is not yet actually helping them by working.

    llg
  5. by   Q.
    Quote from SunStreak
    Why on earth would you resign during orientation? You haven't even given it a chance.


    I would like to know why you want to resign.

    Whatever the reason is, I think you should definitely RECONSIDER!

    Many times the orientation period is the most likely time that new employees/new graduates will leave, as the orientation itself can speak alot about the organization and a new employee's comfort level. If the orientation is shoddy or non-existant, employees are at a risk for leaving. Part of a good retention strategy is a good, solid, supportive orientation.
  6. by   littleplaynurse
    Hi. This is my first response on this wonderful site. When I saw the topic title - my heart stopped. I was too embarrassed to write the same thing - but now that you've broken the ice, I feel the weight has been lifted off my shoulders.........I feel sick at heart at the moment (4:45am here in Boston) because I am so stressed out over my orientation at a "state of the art" , LTC, corporate facility. This place is rife with $$$. Mostly private pay. Opulent in every way - real high-tech - and the newest and the best of everything......so you are asking what's the problem?

    I am beginning to question my own abilities as a nurse and a person and feel as though I have been "set up to fail"...........they painted this wonderful picture of what I was to expect (last week during classroom orientation). I was told the following at that time: "our med nurses do all the meds, answer lights, do the treatments, DO's, admits/d/c's, in addition to their assigned and prn notes........ This week I have been shadowing on the floor. The med pass doesn't get done until the shift is over - it's that simple (and I haven't even done it yet alone). The other med nurses all say the same thing: " It's a wonderful concept, but are you kidding me? The treatments hardly ever get done - not if you want to get through this med pass.....".

    My first nite on the floor - I was pulled away from my med pass shadowing to do an admission. The pt. was a major fall risk and I made sure he had a bed/chair, and personal alarm in place. The alarm went off at least 6 x's. Since I was really an "extra" person, and no one else seemed to hear it, I answered each one. I got there just in time - every time. You are asking "where were the CNA's?" We had TWO CNA's for this team of 22 residents. Each one was responsible for putting 11 residents to bed. As you know, on 3-11, everyone seems to be ready for bed at the same time.......most of them need assistance, and some need complete assist - at which time both CNA's are in the same room.....I can't blame the CNA's. They are run ragged and stressed to the max.........

    What's wrong with this picture?????? All this money, the best of everything, and not enough staff. How is anyone supposed to do their job, maintain patient safety, and be compliant with the med pass????

    I'm so sorry that this is so long - but I just have to talk to anyone before I lose it. Let me preface this tale by saying that the lst day of orientation, I hesitated to even go. My niece had been in a near fatal car accident and was still on life support. I was sleeping with 2 phones in my bed and I was worried sick and exhausted.........I finally decided to go - but explained what was going on to the Staff Development Coordinator. She said she understood, and that we would take it one day at a time - not to worry - see how things go, etc.........RIGHT.

    On Friday of the first week, I was supposed to report to the floor to shadow the charge nurse and observe the goings on......The nite before I spent hours reading the required nursing materials and ended up falling asleep exhausted in the den (which meant of course that since I didn't even get near my bed, the alarm wasn't set......") This is not my style - I was devastated because I knew I would be late and knew this would not look good for me. I always screw myself with my honesty, though. As it turned out, I called to let them know I was on my way. They weren't even aware that I wasn't there - the charge nurse never knew I was coming. I called the SDC and left an apologetic message on her voice mail, telling her I was on my way......bottom line: I could have just shown up, said nothing, and no one would have even noticed - but obviously I could never do that.

    On Friday of my first week of shadowing (yesterday), my youngest child (19 yr. old daughter) woke up and could barely open her mouth because she had such a severe sore throat. She couldn't even swallow Tylenol, or open her mouth wide enough for me to inspect. The left side of her neck was immensely swollen. We ended up at the doctors by 11am. He was very concerned. She had developed a large abscess behind one of her tonsils. He wouldn't touch it - and said she may end up having to be hospitalized. We needed to see an ENT asap. It's now noon and I'm supposed to work 3-11 and have no idea how this will end up. I start to panic. I call the SDC and left a message on her phone stating that "no matter what happens, I will be there - it may not be at 3, but you can count on me to be there....." By 1 PM we were at the ENT's. He anesthetized her throat 3 x's, and then proceeded to drain this awful abscess. My daughter was in agony. We left with rx's for ABT and Tylenol #3.

    By the time I filled the Rx's, picked up juice and gatorade, gave her the meds, got her settled, and was putting on my scrubs - the facility called (at3:02PM), wanting to know, "what's the story here?"....... I told her that I had called (twice actually) and kept getting voice mail, so I called the floor at 2:15 to make sure they received the message (they hadn't). I told her that I was now dressed and about to leave my house - I would probably be there around 3:40 and that I would stay as long as they needed me........The reply? "It's probably better if you just don't come in". I said, "are you letting me go?" She said, "no, it's not that, it's just that we will need to sit down on Monday to discuss the "tardiness" issue." I felt like I had been punched in the stomach. I really don't know how I could have avoided these two incidents, other than taking a later orientation - but hey, they said they would work with me. As for my daughter's emergency - I had no control over that either. These are not usual circumstances in my life, believe me. You know how they say WHEN IT RAINS IT POURS?? That seems to be what's happening these past two weeks - and I have to ask myself if I want to continue at all in this job..............I am a conscientous, caring, loyal nurse, and my self esteem is in the toilet at the moment. ANY advice or feedback from anyone would be greatly appreciated......thanks.
  7. by   aquiniangrad92
    Quote from lynn27
    Unfortunately, I have decided to resign during my orientation--do I need to give a formal "resignation" letter? What about any resignation notice? Concerning my resume, do I need to keep this orientation on it or can I leave it off? Thanks in advance for any info!
    I do think that if your not happy with your work especially at this stage...resigning is your only option. You dont want to stay because you feel guilty or something....in the long run it will only affect your performance as a nurse even you tried your best. I did that once...i resigned during my 4th week of orientation, i gave my formal letter of resignation but i didnt show up the rest of my orientation because its not making sense to stay knowing that im leaving and the fact that im still with a preceptor...the director want to know why im leaving..thinking that im doing well and adapting easily. She said that im a good nurse and asking me to give the work another chance. However staying there for almost a month i realized that the unit was not for me and i felt disappointed. I liked the information and valuable lesson i can get from the unit but not meeting my expectations drawn me to chose other options. You see...i do believe that any work we do are not easy..but you have the power to choose an enviroment that less stress...will make you want to get out of your bed and ready to work without hesitation and feeling good about yourself and maintaining self-confidence and respect.
  8. by   Tweety
    Quote from SunStreak
    Why on earth would you resign during orientation? You haven't even given it a chance.


    I would like to know why you want to resign.

    Whatever the reason is, I think you should definitely RECONSIDER!

    That's the best time to leave. That way neither the employer nor employee has much invested.
  9. by   Leadbyexample
    HI everyone:
    I, two, have had the same challenges and thoughts during my orientation. I had a few call ins that were REALLY sick calls, and then about a month ago, I called in for 3 days in a row because of a depression about my career choice. My preceptor is Nightingale incarnate.... She is the most awesome nurse and she's sweet and she ALWAYS puts the patient's best interest at heart. So much so that when we get an admit, (we work in ICU) I feel edged out when she jumps in and takes over. I've been on this orientation for 6 months now, (it's a 9 month orientation) and I talked to my nurse manager about the fact that I didn't feel like I was advancing like I should because I wasn't being thrown into the "deep end" enough. When I talked to my nurse manager, she expressed concerns for my call ins... She proceeded to "jump on board" and say that she was giving me the information for our employee assistance program to help me get into some stress management courses and that she was not going to lose a good nurse without a fight. After talking to her about how I had been feeling and her response to helping me and asking me to please, come to her if I needed help, I feel like a load had been lifted.

    She is going to put me with another nurse, (who is awesome too!) and let me get "thrown into the deep end" for more experiences.

    All of this just to say, look into your hospitals employee assistance progams and talk to your nurse manager before you quit. Perhaps the area that you are currently working in isn't the place you want to stay forever. Your first choice is rarely your last choice, but the experiences, good and bad, are ALL good learning experiences and will help you become stronger and be a better nurse, and even, a better person. Try to not take ANYTHING personally and TRY not to be so hard on yourself. I know I am the worst at beating myself up over stupid, little, trivial things when I should continue to focus on all the good that I do.

    Sorry this is so long!
    Jeri
  10. by   Justmeandmycat
    Quote from littleplaynurse
    Hi. This is my first response on this wonderful site. When I saw the topic title - my heart stopped. I was too embarrassed to write the same thing - but now that you've broken the ice, I feel the weight has been lifted off my shoulders.........I feel sick at heart at the moment (4:45am here in Boston) because I am so stressed out over my orientation at a "state of the art" , LTC, corporate facility. This place is rife with $$$. Mostly private pay. Opulent in every way - real high-tech - and the newest and the best of everything......so you are asking what's the problem?

    I am beginning to question my own abilities as a nurse and a person and feel as though I have been "set up to fail"...........they painted this wonderful picture of what I was to expect (last week during classroom orientation). I was told the following at that time: "our med nurses do all the meds, answer lights, do the treatments, DO's, admits/d/c's, in addition to their assigned and prn notes........ This week I have been shadowing on the floor. The med pass doesn't get done until the shift is over - it's that simple (and I haven't even done it yet alone). The other med nurses all say the same thing: " It's a wonderful concept, but are you kidding me? The treatments hardly ever get done - not if you want to get through this med pass.....".

    My first nite on the floor - I was pulled away from my med pass shadowing to do an admission. The pt. was a major fall risk and I made sure he had a bed/chair, and personal alarm in place. The alarm went off at least 6 x's. Since I was really an "extra" person, and no one else seemed to hear it, I answered each one. I got there just in time - every time. You are asking "where were the CNA's?" We had TWO CNA's for this team of 22 residents. Each one was responsible for putting 11 residents to bed. As you know, on 3-11, everyone seems to be ready for bed at the same time.......most of them need assistance, and some need complete assist - at which time both CNA's are in the same room.....I can't blame the CNA's. They are run ragged and stressed to the max.........

    What's wrong with this picture?????? All this money, the best of everything, and not enough staff. How is anyone supposed to do their job, maintain patient safety, and be compliant with the med pass????

    I'm so sorry that this is so long - but I just have to talk to anyone before I lose it. Let me preface this tale by saying that the lst day of orientation, I hesitated to even go. My niece had been in a near fatal car accident and was still on life support. I was sleeping with 2 phones in my bed and I was worried sick and exhausted.........I finally decided to go - but explained what was going on to the Staff Development Coordinator. She said she understood, and that we would take it one day at a time - not to worry - see how things go, etc.........RIGHT.

    On Friday of the first week, I was supposed to report to the floor to shadow the charge nurse and observe the goings on......The nite before I spent hours reading the required nursing materials and ended up falling asleep exhausted in the den (which meant of course that since I didn't even get near my bed, the alarm wasn't set......") This is not my style - I was devastated because I knew I would be late and knew this would not look good for me. I always screw myself with my honesty, though. As it turned out, I called to let them know I was on my way. They weren't even aware that I wasn't there - the charge nurse never knew I was coming. I called the SDC and left an apologetic message on her voice mail, telling her I was on my way......bottom line: I could have just shown up, said nothing, and no one would have even noticed - but obviously I could never do that.

    On Friday of my first week of shadowing (yesterday), my youngest child (19 yr. old daughter) woke up and could barely open her mouth because she had such a severe sore throat. She couldn't even swallow Tylenol, or open her mouth wide enough for me to inspect. The left side of her neck was immensely swollen. We ended up at the doctors by 11am. He was very concerned. She had developed a large abscess behind one of her tonsils. He wouldn't touch it - and said she may end up having to be hospitalized. We needed to see an ENT asap. It's now noon and I'm supposed to work 3-11 and have no idea how this will end up. I start to panic. I call the SDC and left a message on her phone stating that "no matter what happens, I will be there - it may not be at 3, but you can count on me to be there....." By 1 PM we were at the ENT's. He anesthetized her throat 3 x's, and then proceeded to drain this awful abscess. My daughter was in agony. We left with rx's for ABT and Tylenol #3.

    By the time I filled the Rx's, picked up juice and gatorade, gave her the meds, got her settled, and was putting on my scrubs - the facility called (at3:02PM), wanting to know, "what's the story here?"....... I told her that I had called (twice actually) and kept getting voice mail, so I called the floor at 2:15 to make sure they received the message (they hadn't). I told her that I was now dressed and about to leave my house - I would probably be there around 3:40 and that I would stay as long as they needed me........The reply? "It's probably better if you just don't come in". I said, "are you letting me go?" She said, "no, it's not that, it's just that we will need to sit down on Monday to discuss the "tardiness" issue." I felt like I had been punched in the stomach. I really don't know how I could have avoided these two incidents, other than taking a later orientation - but hey, they said they would work with me. As for my daughter's emergency - I had no control over that either. These are not usual circumstances in my life, believe me. You know how they say WHEN IT RAINS IT POURS?? That seems to be what's happening these past two weeks - and I have to ask myself if I want to continue at all in this job..............I am a conscientous, caring, loyal nurse, and my self esteem is in the toilet at the moment. ANY advice or feedback from anyone would be greatly appreciated......thanks.
    Oh, brother! Sorry for all of the difficulties you have encountered. As for me, I'm running from LTC has fast as my fat little LPN legs will take me!:chuckle
  11. by   DDRN4me
    Little play nurse!! you certainly have had some extenuating circumstances...what you need to do now is sort out wherter it is the job that is the not right for you, or if your life is just"out of control" right now. If you feel that the job is tryuly "not for yo", then by all means, give a professional written resignation and say exactly that..you do not feel this is the right position for you at this time..YOu could also mention in another letter, perhaps to the DON, that you felt mislead by what is said in orientation and the reality on the floor. I doubt you are the first person to feel this way.


    Hope your daughter and your niece are both feeling better. Chin up..nursing is a great profession, and there are MANY other avenues to explore. Mary
  12. by   barefootlady
    Yes you do need to give proper notice unless the DON says "go" when you turn the resignation in to her. I would get out now, you are having negative feelings, from your post you feel as if you have been mislead and have no support, so get out and look for some place else to work. You have nothing invested here and no real ties to the place. It is better to go while the feelings are civil and professional. I do not think I would say "you mislead me" when asked why you are quitting, they know this place has issues, nothing you say to them will change it, perhaps a report to the state after you are gone is an idea, but for now just say personal issues and leave it at that. I wish you luck on the next job.
  13. by   sun_chica
    I actually had resigned at 6wks into my orientation...my house sold in 2 wks & I was relocating to another state.

    Definetely, give a formal resignation, thanking them for their time & energy & put in a good word for any "great" preceptor you had. You probably won't have to worry about the 2wks notice, b/c you're an extra expense. I was tokd to finish out the day (I resigned in the am), then that would be it. Oh well, you need to look out for you, because no one else is going to!

    good luck!
  14. by   SophieMae
    Sometimes.........the roughest starts, give the smoothest ride!

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