Test results back now what?

  1. Hi everyone.
    I just found out that I passed my NCLEX for LPN! How long do I have to wait in order to get a license# and start working? My next question is that I am currently in a diploma RN program---this is how I was eligible to take the LPN exam----will I be able to get a permit or endorsement in other states like PA, NJ, DE, or MD?
    All replies will be greatly appreciated!! Thanks!!:spin:
  2. Visit nitra12000 profile page

    About nitra12000

    Joined: Dec '03; Posts: 7

    7 Comments

  3. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from nitra12000
    Hi everyone.
    I just found out that I passed my NCLEX for LPN! How long do I have to wait in order to get a license# and start working? My next question is that I am currently in a diploma RN program---this is how I was eligible to take the LPN exam----will I be able to get a permit or endorsement in other states like PA, NJ, DE, or MD?
    All replies will be greatly appreciated!! Thanks!!:spin:
    I guess you squeezed in under the wire! I believe as of June 1, this option (testing for LPN while in RN program) will no longer be available. One of the reasons is that no other states (including NYS) will recognize a license as valid if it has not come after the completion of an accredited nursing program.

    You can, therefore, work as an LPN in NYS, licensed in NYS, but not elsewhere. You will need to have completed your RN program to apply for a license that can be endorsed in other states. And of course, once you HAVE completed your RN curriculum, you can sit for NCLEX-RN and then get a license you can use in ALL the States.

    As for the length of time it takes to get the actual license, or license number, that kind of depends on the time of year you're getting processed, it seems. I don't remember it taking all that long, though, maybe a couple of weeks? And you can call the BON to get your license number (or look it up on the website!) long before the paper arrives in the mail

    Congratulations
  4. by   nitra12000
    Thanks!!! But are their any loop holes? For instance, I know that you can work in any VA hospital and they will accept your license from any state if you are an R.N. however, I don't know if this also applies to an L.P.N. position.
  5. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from nitra12000
    Thanks!!! But are their any loop holes? For instance, I know that you can work in any VA hospital and they will accept your license from any state if you are an R.N. however, I don't know if this also applies to an L.P.N. position.
    I don't know....I just happen to know about this part. I'd be careful about setting yourself up so you can ONLY work here or ONLY work at this type of facility. You never know what life brings! There's been alot of heartache for nurses who did the shortcut route to a license and found out years down the road that it maybe wasn't the best choice longterm.

    You should be close to finishing your RN program anyway, right? Why don't you work close to home/school for now, and then when you graduate (and pass boards!) you don't have to worry about it at all.
  6. by   gt4everpn
    well, lets see, i took my pn on sept 15, 06, i checked to see my results on sept 23, when i went to the office of professions website (ny) they put my license number and info up the same day, the issuedate also says the 23, the day i checked it. i recieved my official license and registration documents about a week after. as long as you passed you can work, even if you didn't get your documents because the info is online. congrats!
  7. by   suzanne4
    Your biggest issue will be that many of the NY hospitals are not hiring LPNs at this time, they are focusing on RNs.

    As long as you can verify your license on the BON website then you can start working as a license number has been issued to you. Verification on the Pearson-Vue website does not give you the required information that is needed by an employer.
  8. by   suzanne4
    Quote from RNsRWe
    I guess you squeezed in under the wire! I believe as of June 1, this option (testing for LPN while in RN program) will no longer be available. One of the reasons is that no other states (including NYS) will recognize a license as valid if it has not come after the completion of an accredited nursing program.

    You can, therefore, work as an LPN in NYS, licensed in NYS, but not elsewhere. You will need to have completed your RN program to apply for a license that can be endorsed in other states. And of course, once you HAVE completed your RN curriculum, you can sit for NCLEX-RN and then get a license you can use in ALL the States.

    As for the length of time it takes to get the actual license, or license number, that kind of depends on the time of year you're getting processed, it seems. I don't remember it taking all that long, though, maybe a couple of weeks? And you can call the BON to get your license number (or look it up on the website!) long before the paper arrives in the mail

    Congratulations

    Not entirely correct. In order to sit for the NCLEX-PN exam, it means that the required courses were completed to be able to sit for that exam, and it also means that a license that was obtained when the courses were completed, it also avaiable for endorsement to other states. And this still holds true.

    Passing of the NCLEX exam, whether RN or PN, gives you reciprocity for the exam, but does not automatically give you a license in every other state. Each state is free to set their own educational requirements, that is why your transcripts always must be submitted to endorse to another state. They do not issue a permanent license just based on the fact that you have a license in another state. You still need to complete the endorsement process for any new state that you wish to get licensed in.

    Licensure in a US state also does not permit the nurse to work if they do not have a visa to work in the US. Something else to be aware of for those that are reading this. RN licensure at the minimum is required for a visa to be able to work in the US.
  9. by   RNsRWe
    Quote from suzanne4
    Not entirely correct. In order to sit for the NCLEX-PN exam, it means that the required courses were completed to be able to sit for that exam, and it also means that a license that was obtained when the courses were completed, it also avaiable for endorsement to other states. And this still holds true.
    Well, I'm only going on what the representative for the NYS BON told me about a year and a half ago, when I was considering the same option. The fact at the time (and I presume it to still hold true, since the change has been adopted now) is that other states were not accepting the LPN license as valid if the license holder had not completed a nursing program. Yes, the person holding the license was in fact an LPN in NY. But as you mentioned, it did not give that person a good shot at getting a license outside of NYS, as other states that require a person to have completed a nursing curriculum were not accepting that license as is.

    So while the license holder did in fact complete the requirements to get licensed in NYS, it meant that those NYS LPNs couldn't expect licensure elsewhere. Unless, of course, they DID go on to complete a nursing program at some point. Much like the 30-unit option in California, in which those licensees were not getting endorsements by other states, neither were RN students who sat for (and passed) PN exam but did not have a diploma or degree when asking for endorsement to other states.

    Thankfully, the problem is now being solved, in that as of June 1, the point is moot.

close