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New nurse needing advise!

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adr60763 adr60763 (New) New

Hello! This week I am suppose to be hearing back from two hospitals I applied to. I would like to know if when you got hired out of school if your workplace offered compensation for things like taking the NCLEX or getting your license? Also did they tell you things like starting pay, how many weekends you have to work, overtime policy...ect and if not whats the best way to get that information before offically accepting? If I get offers to both jobs I'd like to compare things like that before accepting which one I would like. Is that something I should just ask about when they call me letting me know that they want to hire me? Should I just ask what benefits they offer or ask in some way if they could send me a list of benefits/specifications to look over? Also since I applied to two hospitals I hate to say yes to one then the other one call me and offer a position as well but also I'd hate to not accept the first job then never get an offer from the second and end up with no job so how do I handle that? Would the best thing to do would be verbally accept both before the official offer letter comes in decline my second choice?

Sorry for the large amount of questions; I appreciate any input!!

Rose_Queen, BSN, MSN, RN

Specializes in OR, education. Has 16 years experience.

In this day and age, it is very unlikely to be compensated for NCLEX or licensure fees beyond continued employment (if the facility still hires GNs- a disappearing breed) or a job offer (because many facilities will not offer a position or even interview unless one already holds a license).

Starting pay should be included with the offer. Weekends should have been asked about during the interview process as that is something that can vary based on unit staffing patterns. Same with overtime policy, although that is also influenced by laws (some states prohibit mandatory overtime).

What stage of the hiring process are you in? Have you already interviewed and forgot to ask these questions? If so, can you reach out to the hiring manager?

I will be graduating in May. Some of my friends that have already been hired are being compensated for things like NCLEX review and license cost and some aren't that's why I'm curious. I interviewed for two jobs. One interview was a panel interview where I was able to ask questions like overtime and weekends policy because I was only applying for one department at that hospital so I was able to directly take to the nurse manager on the floor. I did not though ask about any benefits like compensation because I didn't realize at that time that was something hospitals were offering. At the other interview I asked those questions as well but because the way the interview was set up I didn't get an exact answer. Through that hospital you applied for three tracts and a random nurse that work on one of those floors and a random nurse manager separately interviewed me and when I asked they told me the policy for their floor but said it varied depending on what floor I was hired on. I am applying in TN. Whats confusing about the hiring manager is that both jobs are through the same company even though they are different hospitals and if you are a new nurse you have to apply through the "nurse residency" program which is directed by someone in the large company versus someone in the individual hospital. I have tried calling her but have not been successful in reaching her. If I'm not able to get in touch with her by tomorrow afternoon I will just send an email but I feel like it would be easier to ask everything over the phone.

I also want to add to clear up confusion that even though the two hospitals are owned by the same company within each individual hospital things are different like pay, policies, nurse/patient ratio...ect

Also I'd like to point out how stupid I feel because I just realized I posted "advise" instead of "advice" oh gezzz :facepalm:

Hello! This week I am suppose to be hearing back from two hospitals I applied to. I would like to know if when you got hired out of school if your workplace offered compensation for things like taking the NCLEX or getting your license? Also did they tell you things like starting pay, how many weekends you have to work, overtime policy...ect and if not whats the best way to get that information before offically accepting? If I get offers to both jobs I'd like to compare things like that before accepting which one I would like. Is that something I should just ask about when they call me letting me know that they want to hire me? Should I just ask what benefits they offer or ask in some way if they could send me a list of benefits/specifications to look over? Also since I applied to two hospitals I hate to say yes to one then the other one call me and offer a position as well but also I'd hate to not accept the first job then never get an offer from the second and end up with no job so how do I handle that? Would the best thing to do would be verbally accept both before the official offer letter comes in decline my second choice?

Sorry for the large amount of questions; I appreciate any input!!

I've actually never heard of getting compensated for taking the NCLEX or getting your license, probably because it's an expectation of any nursing job. However, there are some jobs that will compensate for higher degrees. For example, at one job I got a slightly higher pay rate because I have my BSN.

When I got my job offers, they always told me my starting wage, I never had to ask for that. Weekends were generally included as well. Overtime policy was usually not discussed until after I had started the job, but I don't see why you couldn't ask for that as well.

They usually don't ask that you accept right away. Any time I've received an offer, they've allowed me time to ask questions and they've also asked if I've needed time to think about the offer. Because I've always accepted right away, I don't know how long I would have been given. Ask how long you can wait before accepting an offer; if you get an offer from the other job before your time is up, you may be able to compare and contrast. On the other hand, like you said, the other offer may not come, so you will need to make a decision before your time is up. But, like I said, they usually should give you a couple of days to make up your mind.

NICU Guy, BSN, RN

Specializes in NICU. Has 6 years experience.

It is possible that some of your classmates were working at a hospital (PCA or secretary) and were reimbursed for NCLEX and license as a benefit of being an employee already, but don't offer those to new hires.

Also I'd like to point out how stupid I feel because I just realized I posted "advise" instead of "advice" oh gezzz :facepalm:

Okay this made me chuckle because I was going to give you some advice about making sure you spell things correctly on your resumes. Hee Hee! :roflmao:

Julius Seizure

Specializes in Pediatric Critical Care.

Don't be afraid to ask whatever you need to ask - overtime requirements, salary, benefit package, etc. Even though you are a new grad and don't have much negotiating power yet, its always important to know what you are signing up for before you agree! If they call you with an offer on, say, a Wednesday, it is okay to tell them that you appreciate the offer and will need a few days to think it over and ask if you can give them an answer early next week.

I know that to me, it always felt very strange to do things like that because nobody taught me the business side of having a career. Just try to channel that inner business person a little bit. :)

Semper_Gumby

Has 2 years experience.

I got a job several months after graduation. My hospital did compensate new grads $200 for the cost of the NCLEX, but it was not something that was offered--I found out from other new grads and had to request it from HR. ;) Sometimes positions will list the weekend policy--most I have seen were every other weekend--but that may not be true of a generic "New Grad" position that you have to apply to before being interviewed by specific departments. Definitely don't be afraid to ask questions (I like to ask about on call policy so I know how it works before jumping in). Hope you hear good news soon!

Thank you so much; I'm very excited :) When you called and requested it from HR was that after you accepted your job? I'm also worried about the on call policy. I am planning on commuting from my home town (which is a hour drive) until I can save enough money to move closer (the cost of living is much higher because it's in a big city) so I am unsure on how that would work? If there was mandatory overtime shifts I'd be happy to trade someone their overtime shift for my on call shift but I'm not sure if hospitals will let you do that?

Has any one pass meds with state watching how was it I will need to it will be my first time Im nervous

Call the employer who you haven't heard from and advise them of your interest and inquire when they will make their decision. You might also advise that you have another offer(s) on the table.

djh123

Specializes in LTC, Rehab. Has 5 years experience.

Also I'd like to point out how stupid I feel because I just realized I posted "advise" instead of "advice" oh gezzz :facepalm:

Well, since you noticed that, please don't be offended if I point out that it's 'etc.', not 'ect', and in the case you used it, it was 'supposed to' (hear back) instead of 'suppose to'. Both common mistakes from what I see.

foggnm

Has 8 years experience.

Hospitals don't typically pay for license or nclex. Travel companies will pay for your license when working in a state they are hiring your for. As far as all your other questions, you can ask Human Resources once an offer is tendered, call the number they have listed on your offer letter. Or for very specific questions you may just need to ask the hiring manager as HR might not be aware of all the specifics about OT, weekends, scheduling, etc.

Julius Seizure

Specializes in Pediatric Critical Care.

Ive never gotten an official offer letter on paper or had to sign anything to accept the offer (except for travel contracts). Have you all had to?

DolceVita, BSN, RN

Specializes in IMCU. Has 10 years experience.

There are three hospitals within an hour of my location that clearly state graduate nurses that are hired (i.e. pre-licensure) will get specific benefits. One of these mentioned is, for example, NCLEX prep courses. They appear to be the same facilities that have nurse residency programs. So I encourage you to ask respectfully about the benefits.

I do agree with others it seems unlikely that you would get your license paid for by the facility.

Good luck!

Edited by DolceVita
additional comment

Ive never heard of institutions reimbursing for NCLEX and license. I'd almost say its essential to ask all of those questions. You need to know what the next few years of your life will look like. Be sure you comb through your contract thoroughly before accepting your offer. Usually the the first page or first couple of points on the contract includes base hourly rate, how many weekends, and what types of shifts you'll be working (ie. day/night 12s, straight evening 8s, etc). Also look for things like overtime basis, mandated cut/call, shift differential so you can know if you're not being compensated correctly. A lot of times when you ask HR or unit managers things can be lost in translation, so its nice to have a copy of everything in your contract.

Although there's no guarantee, If you do get job offers from both facilities accept them from both then sit down with your most trusted nursing prof, fellow classmates, family, really anyone who is important to you. Weight all your pros and cons, then make a decision. The best advice I got was to take a job in a location and facility that I could see myself working at. I always wanted to work ICU from the start nursing school. I was offered an ICU job in a rural area, and an telemetry job in a large metro area. I took the telemetry job because the benefits were better and the metro area fit my lifestyle better. Also remember too look out for yourself and that health care is a business. You're a valuable asset so you should act as such. If you accept an offer and then turn it down for the other one, life will go on for you and the hospital wont skip a beat. Do what is best for you! Good luck