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New Grad FNP job hunting

Posted

Specializes in Emergency, CVICU, PICU, NICU, MICU, SICU. Has 17 years experience.

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PG2018

Specializes in Outpatient Psychiatry.

Likewise, I've seen some physicians that fail to meet the "intellectually gifted" category. I'm not sure job titles or the ability to perform "meaningful interventions" infer intelligence. In fact, you could train a monkey to perform meaningful interventions. The degree of understanding behind those interventions is what matters and that doesn't require an advanced practice degree.

I agree wholeheartedly, but why understand if intervention is out of scope for a RN.

PG2018

Specializes in Outpatient Psychiatry.

No, it's not engineering or medicine. It's nursing. I'm wondering why you and PsychGuy are members of a profession that you obviously have no respect for.

You can choose what kind of nurse you want to be. You obviously chose to do the bare minimum as RNs, and I would imagine you do the same now as NPs. That's fine. There are slackers in every profession. However, it's not appropriate to assume that the rest of us mindlessly trudge through our days just because that's what you did.

Mam, I was hired into the Pinnacle of NP positions. I have full autonomy, have managerial authority, see A LOT of patients, and make a lot of money. I got the job because of initiative which brought forth talent.

Being a RN was not remotely what I was led to believe, and truth be told, it was never anything unwanted to spend one iota of time doing. I had a goal, and I achieved it.

I hope I never have the misfortune to become a patient or a co-worker of this guy. If he ever really worked as an ICU RN he obviously was not doing a good job at all if all he did was to act as a "service attendant unable to independently solve a problem".

MikeFNPC, MSN

Specializes in FNP.

Wow, totally out of line.

Mike

It's mind boggling that NPs, clinicians with an actual ability to independently solve a problem, make less than hospital room service attendants (RNs). Why NPs allow that to happen is beyond me. Heck, I'd go ride a cubicle or be a bodyguard or something. I can't see the appeal in having the valets making more than the managers.

MikeFNPC, MSN

Specializes in FNP.

Maybe join your local APRN group. Most of the members (60 attend meetings monthly) at the one I'm in are pretty tight, and offer up job opportunities at each meeting. When I was looking for a position that group produced more potential job offers than any other source.

traumaRUs, MSN, APRN, CNS

Specializes in Nephrology, Cardiology, ER, ICU. Has 27 years experience.

I guess I can only add that I hope all these NPs/APRNs who so deride the profession are happy.

I've been an APRN for 10 years now and though not gloriously happy with my chosen specialty, its a job, I do it to the best of my ability and help to make a difference.

Some days thats all you can ask for....

cayenne06, MSN, CNM

Specializes in Reproductive & Public Health. Has 10 years experience.

Huh. Psychguy, it's not very nice to roundly disparage an entire profession, especially on their own board. I am sure you are very intelligent, and I am glad you have a job you love and are well compensated for it. I am quite intelligent myself, and also love my work. I enjoy being able to stretch my brain past its limit almost every day. I enjoy the challenge of working through a puzzling case. I also enjoy being the one writing the orders, writing the plan, and being a clinical team leader. I like knowing that I have so, so, so very much to learn over these next 5, 10, 50 years. It's exciting. Not everyone likes that stuff though. Nurses who love working the floor are not simpletons passing out dilaudid on autopilot.

It's one thing to say that being a CNM/NP/PA requires a deeper thought process and a wider knowledge base than nursing. That is true, as a general rule. It is also true that not all RNs have the cognitive skill to be a clinician. That's okay. But in no way does that imply that career RNs are not intelligent, just because they are satisfied with their job.

I do, however, agree that we have dug ourselves into a hole with the glut of NP grads we are churning out from some very questionable schools. Not good for the profession or for our patients. While I do not support DNP as entry to practice, we need to shore up the standards for NP education, like right now. No more of this find-your-own-preceptor bullhockey.

cayenne06, MSN, CNM

Specializes in Reproductive & Public Health. Has 10 years experience.

And OP, maybe try applying at Planned Parenthood :) I can't speak for the rest of the country, but my affiliate has robust training and mentoring for new graduates, and we hire them fairly regularly.

synaptic

Has 5 years experience.

Yeah well, pretty much every nurse I know is going back for their fnp so yeah, so much for the cognitive gap.

Aromatic

Has 3 years experience.

Stories like this make me glad I'm going back to medical school. Only a couple years ago the job market where I am was great, now its not so much. I mean there isn't anything wrong with people going back and furthering their education, but when everybody does it, it puts a squeeze on the market.

MikeFNPC, MSN

Specializes in FNP.

I don't blame you for going to medical school, I'm 48 though. When I put pen to paper, it was better for me to go for FNP. If I was 10 years younger I'd have gone for MD.

I'm in Texas where 30% of the counties don't even have a provider at all. So FNP's here shouldn't have a problem at all finding a job.

Mike

OP where do you live? Did you find a job and if so what?